War Memorials – Glenavy

Glenavy War Memorial

Glenavy War Memorial

Many people from the district served in the 1st and 2nd World Wars. Their names can be found on various war memorials, headstones and other records that are available to us. There are unfortunately very few stories surviving about those who served in the 1st World War. I have heard mention of men from Glenavy who had served in the Boer War, but unfortunately very little survives from that period.

This section of the website will allow for additional material to be added over time and linked to the various individuals from the area who have served in the various campaigns throughout the world.


Sergeant Samuel Hill – Victoria Cross Recipient

In the London Gazette dated December 24th, 1858 there is an entry to a “Serjeant S. Hill”, 90th Regiment – Cameronians – in relation to acts of bravery on the 16th and 17th November 1857 during the storming of the Secundra Bagh at Lucknow, India. He saved the life of Captain Irby by “warding off with his firelock a tulwar cut made at his head by a sepoy”. He also went “out under a heavy fire to help two wounded men”. The citation adds “Also for general gallant conduct throughout the operations for the relief of the Lucknow garrison.” Sergeant Hill was awarded the Victoria Cross after being elected to do so by the non-commissioned officers of his regiment.

Very little is known presently about Samuel Hill. He is believed to have been born in about 1826 in Glenavy. In 1844 he enlisted with in the 67th Regiment and then transferred in 1856 to the 90th. He died on 21 February 1863 at Meerut, India. He is believed to have been buried at St. John’s Cemetery, Meerut in an unmarked grave. His Victoria Cross medal is in the Tolson Memorial Museum, Huddersfield, Yorkshire.

The Unveiling of Victoria Cross Plaques for Corporal William James Lendrim and Sergeant Samuel Hill on 29th May 2009 at Market Square, Lisburn.

The following is an extract from The Ulster Star dated March 6th 2009 and is used with permission of The Ulster Star.

Plans underway to honour Lisburn’s forgotten VC hero.

An investigation into the background of Samuel Hill, the Glenavy man who won the VC during the Indian mutiny, has led staff at Lisburn City Council to discover another local soldier who also won the highest honour for military gallantry with the Royal Engineers during the Crimean campaign in 1855.

He is William James Lendrim from Lisburn and now the Mayor, Councillor Ronnie Crawford, is keen to hear more about this unsung hero. Mr. Crawford is also keen to discover if Mr. Lendrim has any remaining family in Lisburn. William James Lendrim enlisted into the Royal Sappers and Miners in 1845, aged 15, as a bugler. After the Crimean War he was posted to 23rd Company which was diverted from a posting to China to tackle the Indian Mutiny in 1857.

He was at the relief of Lucknow and on his return to England eventually became a sergeant major of field works at the Royal Military and Staff Colleges. Sergeant – Major Lendrim also held the Legion d’Honneur and Medal Militaire of France.

He was presented with the Victoria cross by Queen Victoria at Hyde Park on June 26, 1857. He was recommended for intrepidity for getting on top of a magazine and extinguishing sandbags, which were burning, and making a breech under fire on April 11, 1855. He was also recognised for courage and praiseworthy example in superintending 150 French Chasseurs, on February 14, 1855, in building No 9 Battery, and replacing the whole of the capsized gabions under a heavy fire. He was on of four volunteers who destroyed a rifle-pit.

Mr. Lendrim is buried at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst Grave and his VC is currently on display in the Royal Engineers Museum in Chatham. Lisburn City Council intend to explore the possibility of borrowing Mr Lendrim’s VC to display in Lisburn Museum.

“If anyone has information of any families of this name who have lived in the Lisburn area in the last 150 years, I would be delighted to hear from them,” said Mr. Crawford.

“I am delighted that this news has come to light after all these years as these are the only two men from this area to have won this coveted medal, out of all the 188 recipients from the island of Ireland.”

VC Plaques Unveiled

The following is an extract from The Ulster Star dated May 22, 2009 and is used with permission of The Ulster Star.

Plaques in honour of VC heroes to be unveiled.

Lisburn City Council is to honour two soldiers from the area who were presented the Victoria Cross in the 19th Century at a plaque unveiling ceremony on May 29 at the Nicholson Memorial in Market Square.

The plaques have been commissioned to pay tribute to Corporal William James Lendrim, born in Lisburn in 1830, and Sergeant Samuel Hill, born at Glenavy in 1826. They will be unveiled at the Nicholson Memorial by Deputy Commander, Colonel Philip Thorpe, with Lisburn Mayor, Councillor Ronnie Crawford.

The Council is keen that members of the public who wish to see the ceremony have the opportunity to do so.

Music will be provided by the Pipes and Drums of 2 Royal Irish / 152 Transport Regiment from 6.30pm at the Nicholson Memorial with the Unveiling Ceremony starting at 7.00pm.

Corporal Lendrim, Royal Sappers and Miners was awarded the Victoria Cross for courage at Sebastopol, Crimea, in 1855 and was presented with this by Queen Victoria on June 26, 1857. His medal is currently in the collection of the Royal Engineers Museum, Gillingham, Kent.

Sergeant Hill, 90th Perthshire Light Infantry won his VC at Lucknow, India in 1857 for gallantry. He was killed in action in Meerut, India, in 1863.

Both citations will be available to view at the Irish Linen Centre and Lisburn Museum from Friday May 29.

Mr. Crawford said “The Victoria Cross is the highest military decoration which can be awarded to members of the armed forces. Here in Lisburn we have a proud history, and I am especially proud that in our 400th year we will honour both Corporal Lendrim and Sergeant Hill in a permanent and fitting fashion. I believe this rare honour is something to be defined in our history and remembered.”

Plaques in memory of Corporal William James Lendrim VC and Sergeant Samuel Hill, VC

The Digger writes:

On the evening of Friday 29th May 2009 a small crowd of onlookers gathered in Market Square, Lisburn in the beautiful sunshine to witness the unveiling of 2 plaques fitted to the Nicholson Memorial in memory of two local recipients of the Victoria Cross.

At 6.30pm the Pipes and Drums of 2 Royal Irish & 152 Transport Regiment RLC commenced playing music in the Square. At approximately 6.50pm Lisburn’s Mayor, Council members and guests arrived and took up their seats. Council members in attendance included the Mayor – Councillor Ronnie Crawford, Jeffrey Donaldson, Edwin Poots, Basil McCrea and Thomas Beckett. The Chairman and some members of the Lisburn Branch of the Royal British Legion were also present.

The Mayor of Lisburn, Ronnie Crawford was introduced and he made the following speech —

“Colonel Thorpe, Lady Mayor, Alderman Councillors, distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen I would like to bid you a very warm welcome here this evening. I do not think that a greater privilege could befall me as Mayor than to be involved here in a ceremony in which we will unveil two newly commissioned Victoria Cross plaques to honour the memory of two gallant Lisburn men, soldiers from this area and to honour their deeds of bravery. Is there any other city in Her Majesty’s Realm where a Mayor has been so highly privileged?

This is a most ostentatious occasion because we are here to remember these two soldiers from the Lagan Valley – Corporal William James Lendrim VC who was born in 1830 and Sergeant Samuel Hill, VC who was born in Glenavy in 1826.

Both men displayed courage of an immeasurable quality and their valour ultimately saw their reward of the highest and most coveted honour this nation can bestow – the Victoria Cross. These soldiers are long since departed but I feel it is fitting to give you an insight into who they were and why they were bestowed with the Victoria Cross.

William Lendrim was born in Lisburn on the 1st January 1830. In 1845 he enlisted in the Royal Sappers and Miners as a bugler. His VC was won at Sebastopol in 1855 during the Crimean War and the citation reads “ For getting on top of a magazine and extinguishing sandbags which were burning and making a breach under fire 11th April 1855. For courage in superintending 150 French Chasseurs on 14th February 1855 in building number 9 Battery and replacing the whole of the capsizes gabions under heavy fire. He was one of four volunteers who destroyed the farthest rifle-pit on the 20th April 1855.

Corporal Lendrim was presented with his Victoria Cross by Queen Victoria herself on the 26th June 1857. When he first joined the Royal Sappers and Miners he was only 15 years of age, a mere boy, and he was 25 years old when he was awarded the highest military decoration this nation can afford. Corporal Lendrim VC was later present at the Battle of Lucknow in the Indian Mutiny. He died on the 28th November 1891 and is buried at the Royal Military Academy Cemetery. His medal is in the collection of the Royal Engineers Museum in Gillingham in Kent.

Samuel Hill was born at Glenavy in 1826. He first enlisted in 1844 and transferred in 1856 to the 90th Perthshire Light Infantry. His Victoria Cross was won at Lucknow in 1857 during the Indian Mutiny and the citation reads – On the 16th and 17th November 1857 at Lucknow, India, Sergeant Samuel Hill saved the life of a Captain Irby at the storming of the Secundra Bagh and also went in under heavy fire to help two wounded men. In fact he acted with gallantry throughout the operation for the Relief of Lucknow garrison. Sergeant Hill died on the 21st February, 1863 on service in India. He was awarded his Victoria Cross at the age of 31 years of age.

The full citation for Corporal Lendrim and Sergeant Hill can be viewed here in the Museum this evening and I know that if you take the time to look at the display and learn something more about these two great soldiers.

The Victoria Cross is the highest military honour available and takes rank and precedence over all other orders, medal or awards. Both soldiers were awarded the VC only one year after Queen Victoria introduced it to award acts of valour in 1856.

I am especially proud that on the 400th anniversary of our city, and as we mark this anniversary and look onwards that we have this opportunity to be here this evening. The greater Lisburn area has long been a fertile recruiting ground for our Crown Forces and we are immensely proud of our long history as a military garrison and our close connection to our armed services. In every generation people from the Lagan Valley left the fields, the factories and the shops to fight for freedom and democracy all over the world. Whenever Irish regiments have been deployed throughout history they have distinguished themselves as great soldiers.

Many of them left here never to return and now lie buried in the corner of a foreign field. They are remembered on our war memorials and their names shall be held in remembrance along with these two soldiers of whom the city can be rightly proud. Their deeds will never be allowed to fade from the memories of the Lisburn people, who as they pass by these two plaques will recall their deeds with great pride and affection.

I would now like Colonel Thorpe to address us and then to perform the ceremony of the unveiling of the plaques. Following the ceremony I would invite you back to the Lagan Valley Island for some refreshment and in closing could I take this opportunity to thank the Royal Irish and Transport Regiment for the poignant and beautifully played music with which they entertained us here this evening. That is very much appreciated and in conclusion we are lifting a collection this evening for the Army Benevolent Fund . There are great demands on the funds at the present time and I would ask you to support that very generously indeed. Thank you very Much Colonel Thorpe.”

Colonel Philip Thorpe:

“Mr Mayor, Ladies and gentlemen thank you very much. It is a real privilege to be here this evening and what a wonderful evening it is too. What a real privilege to join in the City of Lisburn’s recognition of the award of the Victoria Crosses for William Lendrim and Samuel Hill.

As the Mayor has said, the VC is the most prestigious award for valour in the face of the enemy. It takes precedence over all the other awards for bravery and gallantry and the records show that no fewer than 168 VCs have been awarded to Irishmen since the medal was founded more than 150 years ago. This reflects the long history of service and commitment by the people of Ireland. Service and commitment which continues unflinchingly today on expeditionary operation across the world. In particular our thoughts are with those members of 19 Light Infantry Brigade whose headquarters are based here in Lisburn with another four major units based elsewhere in Northern Ireland. The Mayor and the people of Lisburn have been very gracious in their support of my brigade who deployed to Afghanistan in April of this year. It is a sad fact that even though we are less than 2 months into their tour, 12 soldiers have been killed, 7 of whom were based here in Northern Ireland, 2 of whom will never come back to Lisburn.

No matter that William Lendrim and Samuel Hill won their medals 150 years ago, soldiers today know that the courage and valour of the acts leading to the award of the VC then are no less than the courage and valour of those qualifying for the award today. The people of Lisburn can be as proud of the achievements of William Lendrim and Samuel Hill as they can of every one of the sons and daughters of Lisburn serving in the British Army today.

We thank you very much for inviting me to do this Mr. Mayor.”

The 2 plaques are unveiled as the buglers play, after which the dignitaries and guests leave. The unveiling ceremony was over at about 7.15pm.

The Mysterious Case of the Man with the Victoria Cross

Read about Samuel Hill and other Victoria Cross recipients in The mysterious case of the man with the Victoria Cross – where The Digger recalls the strange case of a man with a medal but no history.

Glenavy Protestant Hall Memorial

Just inside the front door of the Protestant Hall in Glenavy is a memorial plaque. It reads:

ERECTED BY GLENAVY LOYAL ORANGE LODGE
IN HONOUR OF THOSE OF THEIR MEMBERS WHO SERVED IN THE GREAT WAR, 1914 – 1918

There are three columns of names on the tablet. There are a total of 96 names on the tablet. 21 men are listed as killed. The following is a transcription.

Column 1

ROYAL IRISH RIFLES

PRIVATE JAMES FERGUSON 1st BATT
PRIVATE WILLIAM BELL 2nd BATT KILLED
PRIVATE JOHN POLLOCK 2nd BATT
PRIVATE MATTHEW WILLIAMSON 5th BATT
PRIVATE JOHN AGNEW 9th BATT
PRIVATE ARTHUR BELL 9th BATT KILLED
PRIVATE ALEXANDER MCNEICE 10th BATT KILLED
LIEUT LUCAS WARING 11th BATT
SERGT JOSEPH BELL 11th BATT KILLED
SERGT WILLIAM CLARKE 11th BATT KILLED
SERGT THOMAS DALTON 11th BATT
SERGT JAMES H DOYLE 11th BATT
SERGT SAMUEL GREGG 11th BATT
SERGT JAMES HARBINSON, M.M., D.C.M. 11th BATT and
BELGIAN CROIX DE GUERRE
SERGT WILLIAM HIGGINSON 11th BATT
SERGT ARCHIE MCCORD 11th BATT
SERGT THOMAS MATIER, M.M. and BAR 11th BATT
SERGT EDWARD MCCOMB 11th BATT
SERGT JAMES MCGARRY 11th BATT KILLED
SERGT WILLIAM MCQUILLAN 11th BATT KILLED
CORPL WILLIAM GRAY 11th BATT
CORPL WM HARBINSON, JNR 11th BATT
CORPL WM J WILLIAMSON 11th BATT KILLED
L.CPL WM J CHRISTIE 11th BATT
L/CPL JOHN FLEMING 11th BATT KILLED
PRIVATE GEORGE ADAIR 11th BATT KILLED
PRIVATE JAMES ADAMS 11th BATT
PRIVATE ROBERT ADAMS 11th BATT
PRIVATE SAMUEL AYRE 11th BATT KILLED
PRIVATE EDMUND BEST 11th BATT
PRIVATE GEORGE BROWN 11th BATT KILLED
PRIVATE GEORGE BEATTIE 11th BATT
PRIVATE JOSEPH CHRISTIE 11th BATT
PRIVATE EDWARD COSTELLO 11th BATT
PRIVATE ROBERT CROWE 11th BATT

Column 2

ROYAL IRISH RIFLES

PRIVATE JOHN H CAMPBELL 11th BATT
PRIVATE ARTHUR DAWSON 11th BATT
PRIVATE ARTHUR DALTON 11th BATT
PRIVATE ROBERT FLEMING 11th BATT
PRIVATE SAMUEL FLEMING 11th BATT
PRIVATE ALFRED GILLILAND 11th BATT
PRIVATE SAMUEL GRAY 11th BATT
PRIVATE WM HARBINSON 11th BATT
PRIVATE WM HEANEY 11th BATT
PRIVATE JAMES A HOUSTON 11th BATT
PRIVATE RICHARD HARBINSON 11th BATT
PRIVATE WILLIAM JOHNSTON 11th BATT
PRIVATE THOMAS KIDD 11th BATT
PRIVATE OSMOND LENNON 11th BATT
PRIVATE WILLIAM LOGAN 11th BATT KILLED
PRIVATE JOHN LOGAN 11th BATT
PRIVATE HUGH LINDSAY 11th BATT KILLED
PRIVATE WM LINDSAY, JNR, M.M. 11th BATT
PRIVATE WM LINDSAY, SNR 11th BATT
PRIVATE CHARLES MULLHOLLAND 11th BATT
PRIVATE JOE MCGRATH 11th BATT
PRIVATE JOHN MCCARTNEY 11th BATT
PRIVATE SAMUEL MCCLELLAND 11th BATT
PRIVATE JOHN NEESON 11th BATT
PRIVATE JAMES MCCORD NICHOLL 11th BATT
PRIVATE ROBERT PATTERSON 11th BATT KILLED
PRIVATE THOMAS PRITCHARD 11th BATT
PRIVATE THOMAS RANKIN 11th BATT
PRIVATE WILLIAM REID 11th BATT KILLED
PRIVATE SAMUEL WILLIAMSON 11th BATT KILLED
PRIVATE ANDREW WILLIAMSON 11th BATT KILLED
PRIVATE JOSEPH WILLIAMSON 11th BATT
PRIVATE JAMES KENNEDY 14th BATT KILLED
PRIVATE EDWARD COSTELLO 18th BATT

ROYAL IRISH FUSILIERS

2nd LT JOHN CLENDINNING 5th BATT

Column 3

ROYAL INNISKILLING FUSILIERS

PRIVATE WILLIAM ALLEN 4th BATT
SERGT HALLIDAY RUSSELL 7th/8th BATT

ROYAL GARRISON ARTILLERY

GUNNER SAMUEL MCCARTNEY

ROYAL ARMY SERVICE CORPS

SERGT WILLIAM MCCORMICK
SERGT EDMUND JOHN WALKER
PRIVATE JOHN ROBINSON
PRIVATE THOMAS SLOANE

ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS

MAJOR AUGUSTUS A MUSSEN, M.D.
SERGT SAMUEL MCCLURG
PRIVATE DAVID H GRANT

NORTH IRISH HORSE

SERGT ANDREW PARK B SQUADRON
TROOPER ROBERT LOWRY B SQUADRON
TROOPER ALEXANDER ROSS B SQUADRON

NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS

PRIVATE GEORGE LESLIE 2nd/5th BATT

YORKS REGIMENT

PRIVATE ROBERT ERVINE 10th BATT

4th NEW ZEALAND RIFLE BRIGADE

CAPT F.R.K. WARING

CANADIAN FORCES

SERGT FARRIER WILLIAM BOYD KILLED
CORPL JAMES BOYD
PRIVATE WYLIE ALEXANDER
PRIVATE DAVID CALVERT
PRIVATE ALEXANDER CAMPBELL
PRIVATE JAMES HUME
PRIVATE HENRY LESLIE
PRIVATE JOSEPH T MILLIKEN
PRIVATE ROBERT WILLIAMSON
PRIVATE WM J YARR KILLED

The bottom of the memorial is inscribed with four names. They were Orangemen, and office bearers within the Glenavy District at the time the memorial was erected.

Left-hand corner: A. MUSSEN, M.D., J.P., D.M.
GEO. THOMPSON, D.D.M.
Right-hand corner: JOS. NEILL, TRES.
T.T. CLENDINNING, SECY.

War Memorial Plaque inside Glenavy Parish Church

There is a wall-mounted plaque in the porch of Glenavy Parish Church. There are a total of 72 names. It reads:

FOR KING AND COUNTRY
1914 – 1918
ROLL OF HONOUR

Column 1

RANK NAME REGIMENT
RIFLEMAN ADAMS J. R.I.R.
RIFLEMAN AGNEW J. R.I.R.
PTE. ALLEN W. R.INN.F
RIFLEMAN AYRE S. R.I.R.
2ND LIEUT. BALLANCE S.H. R.I.R.
RIFLEMAN BELL J. R.I.R.
L. CPL. BELL R. R.INN.F.
RIFLEMAN BELL W. R.I.R.
RIFLEMAN BEST E. R.I.R.
CPL. BOYD J. CAN.F.
SGT. BOYD W. CAN.F.
CAPT. BREENE R.S. REV. CHAPLAIN
CPL. BUSHE J.H. R.I.R.
RIFLEMAN BUSHE S. R.I.R.
CPL. CALDWELL C.J. IRISH GDS.
RIFLEMAN CHRISTIE J. R.I.R.
RIFLEMAN CHRISTIE W.J. R.I.R.
SGT. CLARKE W. R.I.R.
SGT. CLENDINNING J. R.I.R.
RIFLEMAN CROWE R. R.I.R.
PTE. CROWE S. R.INN.F.
RIFLEMAN DENISON R.M. R.I.R. Y.C.V.
SGT. DOYLE J.H. R.I.R.
PTE. FARR J. AM.F.
DRIVER FINNEGAN J. R.A.S.C.
SGT. GRAHAM W. R.I.R.
CPL. HARBINSON J. R.I.R.
RIFLEMAN HARBINSON W. R.I.R.
RIFLEMAN HARBINSON W. R.I.R.
L/SGT. HIGGINSON W. R.I.R.
RIFLEMAN HOUSTON J. R.I.R.
RIFLEMAN HUME E. CAN.F.
RIFLEMAN HUME J. CAN.F.
CYCLIST INGRAM C.V. CYC. CPS.
RIFLEMAN INGRAM H. R.I.R.
RIFLEMAN JOHNSTONE W. R.I.R.

Column 2

RIFLEMAN LENNON O. R.I.R.
PTE. LESLIE G. N. FUS.
FARRIER LESLIE H. CAN.F.
RIFLEMAN LEWIS S. R.I.R.
RIFLEMAN LINDSAY H. R.I.R.
L/SGT. LINDSAY W. R.I.R.
SGT. LORIMER J. CANT. R. N.Z
TROOPER MAGEE D. HUSSARS
CPL. MARSDEN J. R.I.R.
L.CPL. MATIER T. R.I.R.
2nd LIEUT. MUIR J.L. R.I.R.
MAJOR MUSSEN A.A. M.D. R.A.M.C.
RIFLEMAN McCARTNEY J. R.I.R.
RIFLEMAN McCLELLAND S. R.I.R.
PTE. McCLURG S. R.A.M.C.
RIFLEMAN McCLURG S. R.I.R.
PTE. McCLURG T. R.F.A.
RIFLEMAN McCONKEY M. R.I.R.
SGT. McCORD A. R.I.R.
Q.M. SGT. McKEE H. R.I.R. P.N.S.
RIFLEMAN McNEICE A. R.I.R.
RIFLEMAN McPHERSON R. R.I.R.
RIFLEMAN NEESON J. R.I.R.
RIFLEMAN PATTERSON R. R.I.R.
RIFLEMAN PRITCHARD T. R.I.R.
TROOPER ROSS A. N.I.H.
PTE. SLOAN A. CAN.F.
LIEUT. SMYTH W. R.IRISH.F.
FARRIER STEELE J. R.F.A.
PTE. WADDELL S. SEAF.TH H.
PTE WADDELL W. R.A.M.C.
SGT. WARING F. WELL. I. NZ.
LIEUT. WARING L. R.I.R.
2nd LIEUT. WARING S. R.I.R.
TROOPER WATSON JAS. N.I.H.
RIFLEMAN WATSON JOS. R.I.R.

PARISH OF GLENAVY

Wounded – Samuel Waring

The following extract is from The Lisburn Herald, Saturday, March 3 1916.

Second-Lieutenant Samuel Waring

Second-Lieutenant Samuel Waring, 11th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles (South Antrim Volunteers), who received a serious gunshot wound on the 15th inst., is a son of Mr. Lucas Waring, of Glenavy, County Antrim and a nephew of the late Dr. George Waring, Lisburn. Lieutenant Waring was engaged on a ranch in Australia when the war broke out, and, following a serious illness, came home in the early part of last year. On his arrival he had completely recovered, and he promptly volunteered for service, obtaining a commission in the South Antrim battalion, under Lieutentant-Colonel H A Pakenham, on 10th June. He is now in hospital in France. His brother, Lieutenant Lucas Waring, of the home battalion, has nee invalided to London, where he is undergoing treatment for a serious illness.

Wounded – F. A. Newell

The following extract is from The Lisburn Herald, Saturday, June 3 1916.

Lieutenant Newell wounded

Second-Lieutenant F A Newell, officially reported wounded, is a son of Rev. C.F. Newell, vicar of Templepatrick, and at present an army chaplain. He is also a grandson of Dr. Mussen, J.P., Glenavy. The Gallant young officer, who is in the Royal Irish Fusiliers, was previously wounded at the Dardanelles.

Killed – William J McQuillan

The following extract is from The Lisburn Herald, Saturday, June 3 1916.

Crumlin Sergeant Killed

News has reached Crumlin that Sergeant William J. McQuillan, D. Coy., 11th Battalion R.I.R., has died of wounds received in action. He attained the age of 21 last April and was very popular in the district. He was one of the first to place his services at the disposal of his country, and his many good qualities and endearing personality rapidly gained him promotion in the Army. A staunch Unionist, and a member of Crumlin L.O.L. 314, he also took as active part in the Ulster Volunteer movement, being one of the most enthusiastic in the local D Co. of that body. He was a member of Thorn Lodge British Order of Ancient and Free Gardeners. His early death is regretted, and much sympathy is felt with his father, R. McQuillan, and other members of his family in their sad bereavement. Letters of sympathy have been received by his Captain, Captain Webb (Randalstown), Chaplain Rev. J.J. Wright, and from Sergeant Major Bell.

Rev. J. Jackson Wright, C.F., writing to Mr Robert McQuillan, Mill Road, Crumlin, with reference to the death of his son, says: “He was a great favourite with his company, and worked hard for its success. It is not always easy for a sergeant to maintain his place in the affections of those under him. Your boy had a happy knack of discipline, and I don’t know of a man who ever doubted his justice. He was greatly concerned for their comfort, and set them a noble example of courage. He will be greatly missed, and with sincere sorrow we feel for you. He is buried in a little cemetery quite close to the village, and the grave is marked and registered. A few comrades and I had a short service, and with reverence and decorum his remains were committed to the grave.”

THE CHARGE OF THE ULSTER DIVISION AT THIEPVAL
July 1st 1916

This poem by an Ulsterman, the late Major Samuel K. Cowan, M.A., is reproduced from the “Belfast News-Letter” of 19th July, 1916. (It appears here with permission of the Belfast Newsletter)

Was ever a Charge in the world like this?
Shall ever a son of Ulster miss
A fame that is wholly and solely his –
A fame of sublimest splendour?
The lads who laughed in the face of Death?
Above the roar of the cannon’s breath
Staging their sacred shibboleth
Of “The Boyne” and “No Surrender!”

Giant – strong with the strength of Right –
Fired, by the souls of their sires, to fight –
What cared they for the foeman’s might,
Or how many cannons thundered?
Face to face with a hundred Huns,
Half-a-score of Ulster’s sons
Silenced the thunder of the guns –
Ten – a match for a hundred!

Nought could stay them: nought could stop,
Athirst for blood to the last red drop,
Charging along on the topmost top
Of the waves of Fire that bore them!
On, with a thirst that nought could quell,
Thro’ a hurricane-shower of shot and shell,
To fight – or fall, as their Fathers fell,
In the doughy days before them!

Merrily – every mother’s son –
Laughing, as tho’ they fought for fun,
With a song and a cheer they charged the Hun,
Marring his Makers image!
Chaffing, as tho’ each shell might be
The whistle-call of a Referee!
And the bloodiest tussle in History
Only – a Football scrimmage!

Into the Hell of “No Man’s Land,”
Thro’ poisioned air, at their soul’s command,
And a shrapnel-storm that none could stand,
Charging in wild derision,
Past Sentry Death, who, wondering, kept
His vigil there – on, on they swept,
Where never a man could live – except
Ulster’s divine Division!

Flinging his fun in the face of Death –
Abover the roar of the cannon’s breath
Singing his sacred shobboleth
Of “The Boyne” and “No Surrender!”
Wherever a son of Ulster is,
Honour and Glory shall aye be his!
Was ever a light in the world like this,
Or a charge of sublimer splendour!

Wounded – T. Matier

The following extract is from The Lisburn Herald, Saturday, July 29 1916.

Casualties

Corporal T. Matier, R.I.R. (Glenavy) wounded

Corporal T. Matier.

Photograph from The Lisburn Herald,
Saturday, August 12th 1916.
Found under heading
“They have won undying fame.”
Corporal T. Matier.

Prisoners of War

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Standard Saturday August 12, 1916.

Casulty List
Private J. Hamill, R.I.R. (Crumlin) wounded.

Prisoners of War

Mrs George Beattie, jun, has received information that her husband has been wounded and is now a prisoner of war in Germany. Before he joined the Army, Beattie was employed as a butler by Col. McClintock, of Glendarragh, and since he joined was a servant to Captain C.C. Craig, M.P. He is a member of LOL 471.

Casualty Lists

The following names of local soldiers appeared in a list in The Lisburn Standard on Friday September, 29th 1916

LOCAL MEN ON OFFICIAL CASUALTY LISTS

The names of the following soldiers have appeared in one or other of the official casualty lists issued this week. All are privates unless otherwise stated:-

ROYAL IRISH RIFLES

Killed
19804 S. Williamson, Crumlin

ROYAL IRISH RIFLES

Wounded
19375 R. Adams, Crumlin
19424 J.H. Campbell, Crumlin
19523 S. Grey, Crumlin
2626 L.Corpl. T.G.C. Milliken, Crumlin

In the same edition of the Lisburn Standard the following appeared:

Crumlin Man Dies From Wounds

News has been received by Mr. John Hull, Dundesert, Crumlin, that his son, Sergeant Robert Hull, New Zealand Infantry, has died of wounds received in action on September 13.

Information Wanted

Information is urgently requested as to the fate of Rifleman Jos. Watson (1284) Royal Irish Rifles, who has been missing since July 1. News would be gratefully received by his parents, who reside at Glenavy, Co. Antrim.

Casualty – Private J Burns

The following extract is from The Lisburn Herald, Saturday, September 30 1916.

Casualties. The Week’s Official List.
Royal Irish Fusiliers.

Shell-shock – Private J. Burns (Glenavy)

Casualty List — J. JordanThe following extract is from The Lisburn Standard dated 27th October 1916.

Local Men on official casualty lists

Royal Irish Fusiliers.
17183 J. Jordan, Stoneyford.

Concert for Soldiers

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Standard, 8th December, 1916

A Grand concert in aid of Christmas boxes for Glenavy Soldiers will be given in the Protestant Hall, Glenavy on Friday evening, 15th inst, by the North Irish horse Glee party.

Sergeant Thomas Harbinson

The following extract is from The Lisburn Standard dated 29th June 1917.

Won Ulster Division Parchment.

Sergeant Thomas Harbinson

Sergeant Thomas Harbinson

The above photo of a gallant Glenavy man, Sergeant Thomas Harbinon, Royal irish Rifles (South Antrim Voulnteers), who has been awarded the parchment certificate of the Ulster Division “for displaying great gallantry and coolness in handling his men under heavy fire in a raid on the German trenches.” Before the war Sergeant Harbinson was an enthusiastic member of the U.V.F.

Volunteers

The following appeared in The Lisburn Standard, 6th July 1917

CRUMLIN AND GLENAVY VOLUNTEERS
Presentation of Certificates

A very interesting, and to many a memorable ceremony took place in Crumlin on Saturday namely, the presentation of over 60 certificates of honour to the near relatives of men from the town and neighbourhood who, at the outbreak of the war, volunteered for active service. The proceedings which were arranged by Mr. T.J. English, Lisburn, were held opposite the courthouse in the main street, and attracted a large crowd of the inhabitants. The band from the depot of the Royal Irish Rifles attended, and under the directorship of Mr. Allen, bandmaster, contributed an entertaining programme of martial and popular music.

Colonel E.S.McClintock, J.P., Glendora (who was accompanied by Mrs. McClintock, and his gallant son, Lieut-Colonel Stanley McClintock, D.S.O., Gordon Highlanders), presided.

Rev. J,A, Canning, LL.B., by request, explaining the object of the gathering, said they were met to receive at the hands of those in authority recognition of the worth of their lads who had loyally and voluntarily gone forth to fight for out great empire, for liberty, for civilisation, for upholding the doctrine of our common Christianity – in a word, for the thing that made life truly worth living for. There were flags flying in many places in Ulster that day, but there was one he would like to unfurl, that was a flag inscribed “Our Boys”. They were very proud of them all, from the lord of the soil to the lads who had left the shadow of the humblest rooftree. They were proud of Colonel Pakenham, and they were filled with pride at having with them another distinguished Crumlin man in the person of Lieutenant-Colonel McClintock, who had won by his gallantry in the field one of the blue ribbons of the British Army. (applause). He concluded an impressive address by calling upon the colonel to distribute the certificates.

Colonel McClintock, D.S.O., who was given a hearty reception, said it was with great pleasure he accepted the invitation to distribute the cards to the relations of the men they had sent out to the front. Regarding the men, well, they were doing their best – that was all. As for those who had to stay at home – the womenfolk – were concerned, they had done as much by voluntarily sending out the men. He hoped they would see them back again. Some, he was sorry to say, would not return, and his heart went out to the bereaved relatives.

The following were then handed honour cards in respect of their soldier relatives –

Mrs J. Christie, Mrs Catherine Clarke, Mrs D, Lindsay, James Fleming, Mrs Susan Neeson, Mrs M.A. McConkey, Mrs Ellen Higginson, Mrs M.J. Williamson, Mrs Margaret Dawson, Mrs Margaret Cosgrove, Mrs Ellen McKee, Mrs Jane Lindsay, Mrs Minnie Magee, Mrs Mary Lindsay, Mrs S.J. Gray, sen. (2), Mrs S.J. Gray, jun, Mrs Margaret Gray, Mrs Rebecca Pritchard, Mrs C. Dalton, Mrs Mary Harbinson (aunt), Mrs Agnes McCormick, Mrs Martha Heaney, Mrs Mary Patterson (mother), Mrs Mary Lewis, Mrs Sophia McClelland, Mrs Mary Johnston, Mrs Rose Robinson (sister), Mrs Rose Robinson (cousin), Mrs Elizabeth Robinson, Mrs Sarah farr, Mrs Rachel Ayre, Mrs H. Nicholl, Mrs Elizabeth Nicholl, Mrs Minnie Dalton, Mrs Margaret McCartney, Mrs Agnes Logan, Mrs L. Logan, Mrs Harriett McGann, Robert McQuilland, Jas. Fleming.

Glenavy – Mrs Adams, Mrs Ellen Crowe, Mrs Sarah Graham, Mrs Robert Bell, Mrs Katherine Bell, Mrs Marsden, Mrs Watson, Mrs B. Harbinson, Mrs Mary Bell (mother), James McNeice, Mrs L. Esdell, Mrs J.A. McCord, Mrs Christie, Mrs M. Harbinson (wife), Mrs M. Harbinson (mother), Mrs Mary Bell (wife), Mrs Watson, Mrs Clendinning, Mrs T. Steele, Mrs S. Johnston, and Mrs. Watters.

Mr. English having intimated that certificates could be obtained free by all who applied for them, and who were entitled to receive them.

Killed in Action — George Adair, R.I.R.

The following extract is from The Lisburn Standard dated 31st August 1917.

Rifleman George Adair, R.I.R., killed in action on 16th inst., a son of Mr. Geo. Adair, Seacash, British, Crumlin. He was a member of the U.V.F. and of Ballynadrentagh L.O.L. 1059, Glenavy district. His company commander writes that his loss is very deeply felt throughout the battalion, and that he was greatly loved and respected, both by the officers and men.

WWI Casualties

The following extract is from The Lisburn Standard Friday October 13th 1916.

Third Time in casualty List
Second – Lieut Samuel Waring wounded

Second – Lieut Samuel Waring, Royal Irish Rifles, wounded on the 1st inst., is a son of Mr. Lucas Waring, Bellbrook, Glenavy, County Antrim, and a nephew of the late Dr. George Waring, of Lisburn. He was engaged on a ranch in Australia when the war broke out, and, following a serious illness, came home in the early part of 1915. On his arrival he had completely recovered, and he promptly volunteered for service, obtaining a commission on 10th June. This is the third time Sec. Lieut. Waring has been in the casualty list, the first occasion being in March last, when he received a gunshot wound, and the second in August. We understand that his wounds are not very serious, and Second-Lieut Waring hopes to rejoin at an early date.

The following extract is from The Lisburn Standard Friday December 22 1916.

Roll of Honour Lisburn and District Churches.
Glenavy Parish Church (Rector, Rev. R.R. Muir.)

Fallen.

Sergt. J. Bell
Corpl. C.J. Caldwell
L.-Corpl. R. Bell
Pte.W. Bell

Prisoners of War

Sergt. W. Higginson
Pte. J. Neeson

Missing

Pte. R. Patterson
Pte. D. Bushe
Pte. J. Watson
Pte. A. McNeice

The following extract is from The Lisburn Standard dated 31st August 1917.

Killed

Rifleman George Adair, R.I.R., Crumlin

Wounded

Rifleman S. Ayre, R.I.R., Glenavy
Rifleman S. McClelland, Glenavy

Gassed

Corporal T. Matier, R.I.R., Glenavy
Rifleman Johnston, R.I.R., Glenavy

Rifleman S. Ayre and Rifleman S. McClelland, reported wounded, and Corporal T. Matier and Rifleman Johnston, gassed, all of the local battalion of the Royal Irish Rifles, belong to Glenavy district and are members of Glenavy Parish Church.

The following appeared in The Lisburn Herald, Saturday, September 1st, 1917

4231 Private M.P. Mulholland, Glenavy, previously reported missing now reported killed.

Information has been received that Sergt. Jas. McGarry, Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the 9th inst. Before he enlisted he resided at Aldergrove, and was a member of Ballynadrenta L.O.L. 1059.

Mr. Jas. Adair, Seacash, British, Crumlin has received information that his son, Rifleman George Adair, Royal Irish Rifles, was killed in action on the 16th inst. He was a member of the U.V.F. and of Ballynadrentagh L.O.L. 1059, Glenavy district. His company commander writes that his loss is very deeply felt throughout the battalion, and that he was greatly loved and respected, both by the officers and men.

The following extract is from The Lisburn Standard dated 28th September 1917.

Wounded

Lieut. F.A. Newell, Machine Gun Corps. Corporal J. Hamilton, R.G.A., Lisburn

Private E. Webb, R.A.M.C., Hilden

Private Robert Close, North Irish Horse, Ballinderry.

Lieut. F.A. Newell

Lieut. F.A. Newell, Machine-Gun Corps, has been reported by the War Office as wounded in action on the 21st September. This is the third occasion on which Lieut. Newell’s name has appeared in the casualty list, he having been wounded by shrapnel at Sulva Bay and afterwards gassed in France. He originally joined the Royal Irish Fusiliers in September 1914, and afterwards transferred to the M.G.C., and has passed through most of the heavy fighting in the campaign. He is a son of Rev. C.F. Newell, C.F., vicar of Templepatrick, and grandson of Dr. Arthur Mussen, J.P., Glenavy. He is progressing favourably.

The following appeared in The Lisburn Herald, Saturday, October 6th 1917

Casualties of Great War – killed – Frank Jacob, Royal Field Artillery, Crumlin.

The following appeared in The Lisburn Herald, Saturday, April 13th, 1918

Glenavy Officer Killed. 2nd Lieut. Joseph McVeigh, Royal Highlanders, who has been killed in action was the 3rd son of Mr Joseph McVeigh, Brae Cottages, Bo’ness formerly of Glenavy, County Antrim, and a nephew of Mr Thomas McVeigh, Perth Street, Belfast.

War Memorial in Glenavy Village

The War Memorial in Glenavy Village is sited at the bottom of the village on the Belfast Road junction and close to the entrance of the Parish Church. Each face of the memorial contains names in lead lettering. Some of the lead lettering is now missing.

I have not yet established when the war memorial was erected but an entry in a local Belfast Street Directory from 1920 states …   “A war memorial has been erected in the village street in honour of local soldiers who took part in the Great War.”

Panel 1

ERECTED
IN MEMORY OF THE HEROIC MEN OF
GLENAVY ELECTORAL DIVISION, WHO FELL IN THE GREAT WAR
AND ALSO IN HONOUR OF ALL THOSE WHO SERVED

Survivors

1914-1918

Capt. S.H. Ballance K.E.O.G.R.
Sgt. J.B. Steele R.F.A.
Sgt. H.W. St Clair R.A.M.C.
Sgt. W. Graham R.I.R.
Sgt. J. Harbinson R.I.R.
Sgt. T Matier R.I.R.
Sgt. A. McCord R.I.R.
Cpl. J.E. Adams R.I.R.
Cpl. R.A. Glendenning R.I.R.
L.Cpl. W. Harbinson, Junr R.I.R.
Pte. W. Bell R.I.R.
Pte. J. Christie R.I.R.
L.Cpl. W.J. Christie R.I.R.
L.Cpl. R. Crowe R.I.R.
J. Glendenning 5th R.I.F.
S. Johnstone N.I.H.

Panel 2

1939-1945

R.O. T. Marsden M.N.
Sgt. C.B. Davies S.W.B.
Cpl. F. Bell R.E.M.E.
Cpl. W.M. Walker R.A.D.C.
Pte. W.J. McCullough I.G.
Dvr J. Harbinson R.A.S.C.
Telist W.V. Harbinson R.N.
Sgt. A.L. Walker A.T.S.
Lt.-Col. T. Sullivan R.A.M.C.
Sgt. C.E. Dunn R.A.F.
Cpl. J. McClay R.A.F.
L.A.C. R.McClay R.A.F.
L./-Bde J. Allen R.A.
L.A.C. V.K. Huston W.R.A.F.
Cpl. D.A. Graham R.A.F.
Cpl. E. Matier R.A.F.
L.A.C. T. Taylor R.A.F.
Rfm J. Taylor R.U.R.
Pte. S. Taggart R.U.R.
Pte. D. Taggart W.A.A.F.
Sgt. P. Harkness A.T.S.

Panel 3

1914-1918

Killed

Cdt.(or Cpt.) W.H. Smyth R.I.R.
Sgt. R.J. Bell R.I.R.
Pte. S. Ayre R.I.R.
Pte. D. McC. Collins B.W.
Pte. J. Farr AM. F.
Pte. A. McNeice R.I.R.
Pte. J. Scott R.I.R.
Pte. Jos Watson R.I.R.
Pte. W.J. Yarr CAN. R.
Pte. Jas. Kennedy R.I.R.
Pte. J.N. Reid I.G.

1939 – 1945

A.B.S. J. Taylor R.N.
A.B.D. D. Clendenning R.N.
NOTE: W.H. Smyth is buried Glenavy Parish Church, Grave 294

Panel 4

1939-1945

Pte. N. Fleeton R.I.R.
Pte. W. Harbinson, Sen R.I.R.
Pte. W.N. Isdell R.I.R.
Pte. O.A. Lennon R.I.R.
Pte. J. McCartney R.I.R.
Pte. J. McGrath R.I.R.
Pte. A. Peel R.I.R.
Tpr. A. Ross N.I.H.
Tpr. J. Watson N.I.H.
Pte. C. Leslie N. FUS
Pte. T. Withers S.A.F.
Pte. H. Leslie CAN. F.
Pte. J. Dogherty CAN. F.
Sgt. R. Millar CAN. F.
Pte. J. Hume AUS. F.
Sgt. E. Hume CAN. F.
L. Waring 11th R.I.R.
J. Lyle 5th R.I.F.

FALKLANDS CAMPAIGN 1982

ROI E. Harbinson R.N.

NOTE: W.H. Smyth is buried Glenavy Parish Church, Grave 294

Glenavy Parish Magazine Articles

The following articles relating to the First World War have been extracted from the Glenavy Parish Magazines 1915 – 1918. They give an interesting insight into the lives of those from the district who were engaged in military service.

July 1915
Roll of Honour

The Roll of Honour of those Churchmen from this Parish serving the country in War has now been completed and placed in the porch of the Parish Church. We are glad to be able to make this record as some small recognition of the service of those who are ready to lay down their lives in defence of our homes and our liberties. Our sympathy and prayers are with parents, wives and children, of whom a large number from now on will feel the separation and the suspense of waiting for news of their loved ones. Theirs is indeed the harder part. Again we hope that the sight of that list of names will act as a spur upon many young men who are still hesitating, and lead them to inscribe their names on our country’s roll of heroes. If by any chance we have omitted a name, we should be deeply grateful to be reminded of it.

We append the Roll of Honour to date.

Farrier J. Steele, R.F.A.
Pte. S. Waddell, Seaforth Highlanders
Pte W. Waddell A.S.C.
Trooper J. Watson, North Irish Horse
Pte S. Crowe, 1st R. Innisk. Fusiliers
Corp. C.J. Caldwell, 2nd Irish Guards
Ptes S and T McClurg R.A.M.C
S. McClurg 4th R.I.R.
2nd Lieut. J.L. Muir, 4th R.I.R.
Q.M.S. H. W. McKee 16th R.I.R.
Lieut L.Waring
2nd Lieut S. Waring
Sgts J. Doyle, W. Clarke, J. Clendinning
L-Sgts W.Higginson, W.Lindsay
Corpls J. Harbinson, J. Bushe, J. Marsden
L-Corps. T.Matier, A. McCord
Riflemen S. Ayre, J. Bell, R. Patterson, W. Bell, S. Bushe, W.J. Christie, R. Crowe, W.Harbinson, J. Houston, H. Ingram, W. Johnston, O. Lennon, H. Lindsay, J. McCartney, R. McPherson, J. Neeson, T. Pritchard, J. Christie, J. Watson, 11th R.I.R. R.M Denison, 14th R.I.R. (Y.C.V.)

September 1915

We note with regret that the 2nd Lieut A. Newell, a grandson of Dr. Mussen, has been wounded at the Dardenelles. Mr. Newell, who is now in hospital at Oxford, had only just landed and advanced a short distance, when he was blown into the air by a shell close to him. Almost immediately afterwards he was hit in the leg by a bullet and now finds himself in England, a few weeks after he left.

November 1915
Comforts for Fighting Forces

A local committee has been formed to provide mufflers, socks etc. for our men at sea and at the front. All religious persuasions are represented and are working harmoniously together in this good cause. We commend it to the notice of our readers. The time is one for sacrifice. A hard winter is before our sailors and soldiers and they will all do better if they know that the folk at home are backing them up. Let those who can give liberally, some have not much to give. Perhaps they could offer themselves to work. So many can knit in spare moments and it will all be helping on a good work.

February 1916
Roll of Honour

The parish roll of Honour now totals 61. This number necessitated a new and larger roll, the frame for which was currently made and presented by Mr. G.E. Ingram. There is still room for more names.

June 1916
Our Soldiers

Three of our local officers Lieutenant L. Waring, Second Lieutenants J.L. Muir and T. Waring, are home; the two former on sick leave, the last-named wounded. We have noticed other local soldiers home on short leave, amongst them Sergeant J. Clendinning. To be once more amidst familiar surroundings and in quietness must be the greatest relief to the brave fellows after the ceaseless strain and constant looking death in the face. While to those who have waited, and watched and prayed, with the cold hand of anxiety clutching at their hearts, the sight of them and the sound of them, even for a little while, comes as a blessed boon.

It was with regret that we learned of the death of Sergeant McQuillan, of Crumlin, and that other Crumlin men, Sergeants Doyle and Higginson and Rifleman McClelland have been wounded.

Second-Lieutenant Arthur Newell is a grandson of Dr. Mussen and well-known in the neighbourhood. He was wounded in the landing at Sulva Bay, and after being some time on home service had only recently gone to the French front.

These instances of casualty happening to those whom we know bring home the fact of war to us. They ought to stiffen our determination to do all that lies in our power to help on our country in this supreme effort to uphold the cause of right, so that the war may be brought to such a conclusion as shall effectively prevent the like from ever occurring again.

August 1916
Killed in Action.

L-Sgt. J. Bell 11th R.I. Rifles.

In our last issue we alluded to the work then being done by our Ulster troops in the great battle in the Somme. Since then we have heard a great more detailed account of the amazing valour of the Ulstermen which has given them for all time amidst the heroes of the British Empire. As was to be expected the loses have been heavy. Many homes are mourning the loss of husbands, sons and daughters. Our local contingent suffered heavily. At least one, L-Sgt Bell was killed and many are wounded and of a considerable number there has been no tidings whatever. We refrain from giving their names as different individuals may be heard of at any time. The following as far as we have been able to ascertain is a list of those wounded.

Corporal T. Matier
Rifleman S. Ayre
Rifleman J. Nelson
Rifleman S. McClelland
Rifleman W. Johnston
Rifleman A. Dalton (shell shock)
Rifleman J. Christie
Rifleman H. Graham

The heartfelt sympathy of the whole community is extended to the bereaved and to those in anxiety and suspense may God give them comfort and peace of mind.

September 1917
Local War Items

Our Ulster Division has again been hotly engaged with the enemy having taken part in fierce fighting during the past month, notably on the 10th and 16th. Many homes are in mourning throughout the province as well as throughout the whole length and breadth of the Empire, and we fear the whole tale of losses is as yet incomplete.. Of our local men we have one word that Corporal T. Matier and Rifleman Johnston have been gassed, Riflemen S. Ayre and S McClelland wounded, all in recent fighting and all for the second time put out of action. The two last named have returned to the front. There are rumours of others being missed but in the absence of definite information, we don’t mention names.

Sgt. J. Clendinning, who has been suffering from shock is now in home service.

Rifleman O. Lennon has been invalided and has now returned to civil life. Cadet W. Smyth who served for some time at the front has also been home convalescent and expects soon to return to duty.

November 1917

The offerings of fruit and vegetables were dispatched to the U.V.F. hospital, Belfast. On the following Monday we received a grateful acknowledgement from the secretary.

January 1918
Our Soldiers

We noted with pleasure that Lieut. S. Waring has been mentioned in dispatches. Mr. Waring has been wounded or gassed three times in the last year and a half and is now convalescent. We wish him a speedy recovery.

Amongst our local soldiers we have noted on home leave, Sergeant A. McCord whose health has been slightly broken down and who is now convalescent at Clandeboye.

Sgt. Bushe, Pioneers W. Harbinson, T. Matier and W. Lindsay, Ptes. T.F. Sloan, and R. Millar – the last name convalescent from his second wound this year.

April 1918
Our Soldiers

It is with regret that we have to chronicle the fact that Lieut-Colonel Stanley McClintock D.S.O. has again been wounded but fortunately his injuries are comparatively light and such as to cause no great anxiety. Rifleman H. Ingram has been wounded for the third time and gassed. We wish him a speedy convalescent and a long leave on which to make a complete recovery.

May 1918
War Items

We have to chronicle with regret the death in action of Sergeant W. Clarke 12th Btn. RIR and offer our sincere sympathy to his widow, children and parents.

Lieut. Lucas Waring has been wounded and is now in hospital in England. All three of Mr. Waring’s sons now have been wounded, two of them more than once.

Private Walter Smyth has been severely wounded and is lying in hospital in France. We sympathise most dearly with his family in their anxiety concerning him which is all the more keen owing to their recent sad bereavement in the death of a dearly loved daughter and sister. (The sister who died was called Elizabeth Annie Smyth)

Killed in Action

Sgt William Clarke 12th Royal Irish Rifles.

June 1918
Died of wounds – Walter Smith (Smyth)
War Items

It is with sincere regret that we publish the death of Cadet Walter Smith whom we last month notified as having been seriously wounded on active service in France. The deepest sympathy will be felt for Mr. And Mrs. Smyth and their family on this sad bereavement, following so closely on the death of a dearly loved daughter. The Christian hope and consolation is theirs. “He is not dead but sleepth.” He has with many another noble youth given his life for others and a halo of glory surrounds the sacrifice.

Another of out Glenavy parishioners, Lieut. S. Waring has again become a casualty for the fourth time. While we sympathise with Mr. Waring on being put out of action and undergoing such sufferings so soon after going out again, at the same time we feel that he and his relatives are to be amalgamated on his preserving his life.

Private T. Sloan is reported in hospital in France suffering from a contused foot.

Rifleman McClelland is in Randalstown convalescent camp also suffering from severe injuries to the foot.

August 1918
Local War Items

We notice that Lieuts. L and S. Waring are home at present, the former convalescent from wounds, the latter we understand permanently invalided as the result of repeated casualties.

Lieut. J.L. Muir is in hospital in England suffering from burns caused by a bomb. Sergeant J. Clendinning is now a cadet training for a commission and is on short leave. We congratulate him n his well-merited distinction earned in the field.

October 1918
Local War Items

It is with sincere gratification that we have to record the fact that the military medal has been won by two more of our parishioners – Sgt. J. Harbinson, whom we saw home on leave recently, and Rifleman T. Matier, also by Sgt. Lyle of Crumlin, a son-in-law of Mr. W. McMullan, a well-known Crumlin parishioner. Sgt Lyle also won his commission on the field. This district, Glenavy Parish and the immediate neighbourhood has certainly every reason to be proud of the valour of its soldiers. We congratulate them and their relatives and anticipate with pride their winning still further laurels for their native place.

Corporal J. Steele, a Mons veteran has been home on short leave. We were glad to see him looking so well and strong, not in the least war worn.

November 1918
Local War Items

It is with great regret that we have to put on record the death from pneumonia of Company Sgt -Major James Boyd, Canadian R.E., son of Mr. William Boyd, Main Street, Crumlin. This is second son Mr. Boyd has lost owing to the war, his only other son having been killed in France sometime ago. He, his wife and family can be assured of the sympathy of the whole community in their great sorrow.

Shoeing smith H. Leslie, also in the Canadian Army is in hospital in England, severely wounded, as also Lance-Corporal M.G. McConkey 12th Royal Irish Rifles – rheumatism.

December 1918
Local Prisoners of war

We understand that already two of our local prisoners of war – Corporal James Marsden of Glenavy and Sgt William Higginson of Crumlin are on home leave. We congratulate them on their release and hope that their stay with their friends will shortly wipe out the memory of their recent trying experiences at the hands of the enemy.

Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Ireland

The following is an extract from the Grand Lodge of Free and accepted Masons of Ireland Roll of Honour 1914 – 1919.

Lodge 140, Crumlin
Branagh, Henry Ship’s Corporal, R.N.
Robinson, John Private, R.A.S.C.
Mairs, John Corporal, Royal Marines
Marrs, William V. C. Eng., R.N.
Lodge 326, Ballinderry
Close, J. Private, R.F.A.
McCullagh, A. Lieut., R.I.F.
Peel, M.J. Private R.I.R.
Waring, L. Lieut., R.I.R.
Lodge 513, Ligoniel
Isdell, Wm. N. Private
McKittrick, Saml. S.M.
McLean, Robert S.M.
White, Joshua Private

David Corkey and the terrible reality of The Great War

David Corkey

David Corkey

DURING his ministry at Dundrod a series of worldwide events in 1914 culminated in what was to be later referred to as The Great War.

A number of men from Dundrod signed up and David Corkey, determined to play his part, applied to be Chaplain at the front. His post was confirmed by the War Office in late April 1915.

We are fortunate that David Corkey kept a diary of his movements and experiences throughout this time. He was also a prolific letter writer and thanks to his descendants many of these letters survive today, enabling us to piece together the events of that era. The documents were also utilised by his sister-in-law Ethel Corkey when she wrote her book “David Corkey – a life story.”

Read more » »

Drooth, dreams and temperance
– The Digger looks back at the thorny issue of alcohol and the church

Whiskey Jug

Cruiskeen Lawn Whiskey

ON the 6th April, 1816 it was reported by the Belfast Newsletter that the innkeeper at Dundrod, David Mairs, lost the thatched roof from his dwelling house and adjoining barn during what was described as a “singular weather phenomenon.”

The report states that “a severe shower of hail, accompanied with loud peals of thunder, a body of matter was observed resembling a little dark cloud stretching itself to the ground and wreathing like that part of a water-spout which may be seen in a fluctuating state before it bursts.”

Some of the thatch from Mr. Mair’s homestead was located three quarters of a mile away.

Almost 20 years later the Ordnance Survey Memoirs make a brief reference to the “hamlet of Dundrod” and informs us that Dundrod “is merely a collection of 12 dirty-looking cottages and one two-storey house occupied as a whiskey shop.”

Read more » »

Death Notice – Captain Samuel Waring

The following extract is from the Lisburn Standard dated 19th February 1954.

Captain Samuel Waring, M.C.

The death took place on Monday 8th February, after a brief illness, of Captain Samuel Waring, M.C., Riverside House, Kells, Eire. He was 67.

The youngest son of the late Mr. Lucas Waring, Bellbrook, Glenavy, County Antrim, who was master of the Killultagh Harriers, Captain Waring was formerly a prominent and successful amateur steeplechase jockey. He spent his early days in South Africa and New Zealand. Captain Waring served throughout the first world war during which he was awarded the Military Cross. He had an amazing experience during a gas attack. The British sent out gas towards the enemy lines, but the wind changed its course and blew the gas back. A group of two hundred soldiers, including Captain Waring, received the full blast. All of them, save Captain Waring, wore gas masks – he had given his to his batman. All who took part were severely gassed, save the Captain. Later he was badly wounded. Captain Waring’s wife was formerly Miss Ethelreda St. George, only daughter of the late Dr. George St. George, well known in Lisburn medical circles. She died about 2½ years ago. During the “troubles” Captain Waring, who was a familiar figure in the town, did much while in Lisburn to quell the local disturbances.

He is survived by his sister, Miss M.K. Waring, of Dunmurry.

The funeral which took place to St. John’s Churchyard, Kilwarlin, Hillsborough, on Wednesday, 10th February, was private.

The funeral arrangements were carried out by the firm of Robert Jellie, undertaker, Smithfield, Lisburn.

The effect of Two World wars on one family – The Huston Family

William Wentworth Huston, born in 1862 was the second son of Dr. Charles Todd Huston, Tynan, County Armagh. He married Elizabeth Victoria Simpson in 1883 in her native county of Kildare.The Hustons emigrated to the Capetown area of South Africa where their first three children, Eileen, Dorothy and Claud were born. The remainder of their nine children – Victor, Stella, Hilda, Gerald, Victoria and Donald were born in Belfast.A well- preserved daily diary dated January 1887 to January 1888 kept by Elizabeth Huston documents the toils and tribulations of a mother raising her young children in the Capetown area.

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