Dundrod Townland, Tullyrusk

Land Sale – 1799

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated Tuesday 22nd October, 1799. It is reproduced with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

To Be Sold By Auction
On Monday the 4th November next,

That farm of land in Dundrod, containing about 16 Acres, inland ground, besides about the like quantity of Mountain – held by lease for on Life yet in being, at £7 8 7h yearly; sitaute on the Road from Belfast to Lough Neagh – On the premises is a Flax Mill, and a fall with supply of Water for a Green, had plenty offp-ead ground – The sale to begin on the Premises at 12 o’clock of said day – Terms at sale.

Belfast, 21st Oct. 1799

Statistical Account or Parochial Survey of Ireland

The following is an extract from the “Statistical Account or Parochial Survey of Ireland – Parishes of Glenavy, Camlin & Tullyrusk” by the Rev. Edward Cupples.

Since these papers were prepared for the press, the following account of a phenomenon in Dundrod, in the parish of Tullyrusk, appeared in the Belfast News Letter, of the 9th of April 1816:- “Singular Phenomenon – On the 6th ult., during a severe shower of hail, accompanied with loud peals of thunder, a body of matter was observed in the neighbourhood of Dundrod, county of Antrim, resembling a little dark cloud stretching itself to the ground, and wreathing like that part of a water-spout which may be seen in a fluctuating state before it bursts. It continued moving rapidly in a north-easterly direction, till coming to the house of David Mairs, Inn-keeper, it instantly carried off the whole thatch from the dwelling-house, together with that of an adjoining barn; also, a rick of hay that stood a few perches from the kitchen door. Some of these were found scattered throughout the fields at the distance of three-quarters of a mile from Mair’s. and some were caught by the neighbouring hedges, which were broken down; some thorns were torn out of root, and part of a potatoe pit, against which it struck, scattered through the field. Continuing its course in the direction before-mentioned, and leaving behind it the strongest symptoms of impetuosity, it came to the dwelling of a man named Crothers, about a mile from the former house – the door was latched and barred with a spade, placed obliquely against it in such a manner as not to recede, but such was the force of the impulse, that the door was instantaneously driven open, the latch broken, the head of the spade forced through the door, and a woman who was sitting at the fire with a child in her arms, was carried to the back part of the kitchen; on recovering, she perceived a body of fire going out at a breach made in the roof opposite the door – Some of the thatch, &c., was carried away a considerable distance from the house; also the top of an oat stack, part of which has not since been found. From its effects, it appears to have been about one hundred yards in breadth, and to have continued nearly three miles in its course. We are happy to add that no person received any material hurt from it.”

Ordnance Survey Memoirs

The following extract is from “Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland – Parishes of County Antrim VII 1832 – 1838”. Thanks to The Institute of Irish Studies, The Queen’s University of Belfast for permission to use this extract.

Mills

In the town land of Dundrod, and on the Crumlin water, is a cornmill propelled by an undershot water wheel 4 feet 4 inches broad and 14 feet in diameter. It has a fall of water of 13 feet. (insert addition: On the Crumlin River near Dundrod bridge is a corn mill and the ruin of a flax mill. The diameter of the wheel belonging to the corn mill is 14 feet, breadth of buckets 4 feet 4 inches, fall of water 12 feet, an undershot wheel.)

Freehold Registrations, 1831

The following is an extract from The Belfast Newsletter dated 30th September 1831 and is used with permission of The Belfast Newsletter.

The following names are taken from a list of persons applying to register their Freeholds at a General Quarter Sessions of the Peace to be held in Belfast on the 24th October, 1831.

No. 136

Name and Residence of Applicant: Joseph McCullagh, Dundrod
Description of Freehold, with the names of Barony and Townland in which situated: House and land, Upper Massereene, town land of Knockern
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

No. 155

Name and Residence of Applicant: John Mairs, Dundrod
Description of Freehold, with the names of Barony and Townland in which situated: House and land, Upper Massereene, town land of Dundrod
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

No. 156

Name and Residence of Applicant: David Mairs, Dundrod
Description of Freehold, with the names of Barony and Townland in which situated: House and land, Upper Massereene, town land of Dundrod
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

No. 164

Name and Residence of Applicant: John Rusk, Lower Ballycellon
Description of Freehold, with the names of Barony and Townland in which situated: House and land, Upper Massereene, town land of Dundrod and Bodore
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

No. 173

Name and Residence of Applicant: William White, Dundrod
Description of Freehold, with the names of Barony and Townland in which situated: House and land, Upper Massereene, town land of Dundrod
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

No. 174

Name and Residence of Applicant: John White, Ballykennedy
Description of Freehold, with the names of Barony and Townland in which situated: House and land, Upper Massereene, town land of Dundrod
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

Drooth, dreams and temperance
The Digger looks back at the thorny issue of alcohol and the church

Whiskey Jug


The Cruiskeen Lawn Whiskey jug that helped quench the drooth of some of the Fourscore men

ON the 6th April, 1816 it was reported by the Belfast Newsletter that the innkeeper at Dundrod, David Mairs, lost the thatched roof from his dwelling house and adjoining barn during what was described as a “singular weather phenomenon.”

The report states that “a severe shower of hail, accompanied with loud peals of thunder, a body of matter was observed resembling a little dark cloud stretching itself to the ground and wreathing like that part of a water-spout which may be seen in a fluctuating state before it bursts.”

Some of the thatch from Mr. Mair’s homestead was located three quarters of a mile away.

Almost 20 years later the Ordnance Survey Memoirs make a brief reference to the “hamlet of Dundrod” and informs us that Dundrod “is merely a collection of 12 dirty-looking cottages and one two-storey house occupied as a whiskey shop.”

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1816 Phenomenon

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated Tuesday April 9th 1816 and has been used with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Singular Phenomenon – On the 6th ult during a severe shower of hail, accompanied with loud peals of thunder, a body of matter was observed in the neighbourhood of Dundrod, county Antrim, resembling a little dark cloud stretching itself to the ground and wreathing like that part of a water spout which may be seen in a fluctuating state before it bursts. It continued moving rapidly in a north-easterly direction, till coming to the house of David Mairs, inn-keeper, it instantly carried off the whole thatch from the dwelling-house, together with that of an adjoining barn; also. A rick of hay that stood a few perches from the kitchen door. Some of these were found scattered through the fields at the distance of three-quarters of a mile from Mair’s, and some were caught by the neighbouring hedges, which were broken down; some thorns were torn out of root, and part of a potatoe pit, against which it struck, scattered through the field. Continuing its course in the direction before-mentioned, and leaving behind it the strongest symptoms of impetuosity, it came to the dwelling of a man named Crothers, about a mile from the former house – the door was latched and barred with a spade, placed obliquely against it in such a manner as not to recede, but such was the force of the impulse, that the door was instantaneously driven open, the latch broken, the head of the spade forced through the door, and a woman who was sitting at the fire with a child in her arms, was carried to the back part of the kitchen; on recovering, she perceived a body of fire going out at a breach made in the roof opposite the door. – Some of the thatch, &c were carried away a considerable distance from the house; also the top of an oat stack; part f which has not since been found. From its effects, it appears to have been about one hundred yards in breadth, and to have continued near three miles in its course. We are happy to add that no person received any material hurt by it.

Extract from Griffith Valuation 1862 – Union of Lisburn (Part of)

County of Antrim — Barony of Massereene — Union of Lisburn

Column 1 : Number and letters of Reference to map
Column 2 : Occupiers
Column 3 : Immediate Lessors
Column 4 : Description of Tenement
Column 5 : Area (Acres, rood, perches)
Not included Rateable Annual Valuation of land and buildings and Total Annual Valuation of Rateable property
Townland: DUNDROD
Ordnance Survey map number: 60
1 Archibald McCullagh Marquis of Hertford Land 13 01 30
2Aa Robert Potts same Herd’s ho.Off & land 78 00 30
2B same same Offices and land 124 00 00
2BAb Martin Farrell Robert Potts House Offices
2BAc James Greer same House
2BAd William Cooke same House
2BBc Matthew Stewart same House
2BBd John Martin same House
3 William John Stewart Marquis of Hertford House Land 06 01 05
4 Francis Bradley same House Office Land 12 02 35
5a John Mairs same House Offices Land 23 01 25
5b same same same 11 03 15
5c same same same 32 01 20
5ca Unoccupied John Mairs House Offices
6a John Ireland Marquis of Hertford Land 17 03 25
6b same same same 37 02 10
6c same same same 34 03 25
7a Re. William Magill same House Office land 20 02 15
7b,c Presbyterian Meeting House & offices see exemptions
7c Anne Patrick Presbyterian Congregation House and Office
8 National School- House and land see exemptions
9 Mary White Marquis of Hertford House Offices land 18 02 20
10a Thomas Herdman same House Offices land 01 00 20
10b same same same 08 03 20
11 Robert Willis same Hou. Offs. Cornmill Land 05 00 25
12 Hugh Bradley same House Offices land 05 00 35
13 Arthur Maniece same House Offices land 18 01 20
14 William Blair same House Offices land 14 01 15
15 William McHenry same House Offices land 23 01 10
16 Thomas Boomer same House Offices land 14 03 15
17 Francis Cormican same House Offices land 13 02 30
18 Thomas Browne same Land 20 01 05
18a John Irwin Thomas Browne House and Garden 00 10 00
19 John Willis Marquis of Hertford House Office land 13 02 20
20 Adair Magee same House Offices land 23 02 05
21 David Browne same House Offices land 19 01 05
22 David McCullagh same Land 25 02 15
22a Unoccupied David McCullagh House
22b Daniel Toland same House Offices
23a David Agey Marquis of Hertford Land 07 01 23
23b same same same 03 02 20
24 William Shannon same House and land 01 02 00
25 James Moore same House and land 02 00 15
26 Clarges Mairs same House Offices land 46 03 10
27 James Mairs same House Offices land 24 00 05
28a Sarah Boomer same House and land 01 01 30
28b Anne Moffitt John Mairs House
28c Shaw Armstrong Marquis of Hertford House
29 Samuel Johnston same House Offices land 37 00 20
30a Samuel Johnston same Land 05 02 25
30b same same same 09 00 00
31 William McCullagh same House Offices land 20 00 15
32aa Joseph McCullagh same House Offices land 31 03 00
32b Joseph McCullagh same same 05 02 35
32bb Unoccupied Joseph McCullagh House
32bc Samuel Scales Marquis of Hertford House and Garden 00 02 00
33 Thomas Waters same Land 15 00 00
34 same same House Offices land 35 01 03
35aa William Waters same Land 08 00 25
35b same same same 10 02 20
35ab David McNeice William Waters House
36 William Waters Marquis of Hertford House Offices land 14 00 05
37a Robert Waters same House Offices land 01 00 20
37b same same Land 14 03 10
38 same same same 08 01 15
39 James Moore same Land 02 02 25
39a Edward Smith James Moore Ho, Off, forge, Gdn 00 01 15
40 James Moore Marquis of Hertford House Offices land 13 01 25
41 John White same House Office land 18 02 10
42 James Ireland same House Office land 18 03 30
43a Thomas Ireland same House, Offices land (see also 40) 47 02 30
43b Isabella Ireland Thomas Ireland House and Garden 00 01 10
44 Anne Young Marquis of Hertford House Offices land 21 01 13
45a John McKee Jacob Bannister House Offices land 35 03 13
45b same same same 03 01 00
46 Thomas Ireland same Land 27 01 34
46a Unoccupied Thomas Ireland House
47 Thomas Thompson Marquis of Hertford House Offices land 28 03 15
48 Patrick Barclay same House Office land 09 03 30
49 Alexander Ireland same Land 32 00 00
Total of Rateable Property 1203 03 19
Exemptions: Presbyterian Meeting House and Offices
National School-house and land-
01 01 20
Total of exemptions: 01 01 20
Total, including Exemptions: 1204 03 39

Death Notice – Edward McConnell

The following extract is from the Northern Whig 12th July 1876

McConnell – July 9th at his brother’s residence, Budore, Edward McConnell, aged 35 years.

Death Notice – Thomas Ireland

The following extract is from The Northern Whig 27th November 1876

Ireland – Nov 25 at his late residence, Dundrod, Thomas Ireland, aged 71 years. His remains will be removed to Dundrod burying ground on tomorrow (Tuesday) the 28th inst, at eleven o’clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Presentation of Gown and Sovereigns

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 31st March 1877 and is reproduced with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Address and presentation to the Rev. John Clarke, M.A., Dundrod.

A congregational meeting was held in the Presbyterian Church, Dundrod, on Thursday evening. There was a very large attendance. After tea it was moved by the Rev. W. Magill, senior minister of Dundrod, and seconded by the Rev. J. Black, Lylehill, that the Rev. A.C. Canning, Crumlin, do take the chair.

The chairman explained that the object of the meeting was the presentation of a handsome pulpit gown and purse of sovereigns to their young minister, the Rev. J. Clarke. Messrs. Sinclair, Connor, Wylie, Thompson, and Higginson then came forward as a deputation on behalf of the ladies to make the presentation. Mr. Wylie having read the address, Mr. Clarke briefly replied. Addresses of an appropriate character were afterwards delivered by the Rev. H. Hamilton, Templepatrick; Rev. R. Barron, Whitehouse; and Rev. J.L. Rentoul and J. Clarke. The usual votes of thanks were passed by acclamation to the ladies and the chairman. The meeting was closed with prayer by the chairman.

Lisburn Fair Accident

Extract from The Lisburn Standard, Saturday, July 27th 1889.

Accident at Lisburn Fair

On Monday last, during the throng of the fair, David officer, twenty-four years of age, the son of a farmer resident near Dundrod, received a serious injury. It appears that Officer was leading a horse along the street, which was densely crowded at the time, when a passing horse kicked out and struck the young man on the left thigh, inflicting a serious fracture. The injured man was conveyed to the infirmary, where he received careful attention from Dr. St. George, and is still under treatment.

Purchase Proposal – Dundrod Meeting

The following extract is taken from The Lisburn Standard dated Saturday, September, 28th 1889. Ongoing meetings in Lisburn District were being held at this time to discuss Sir Richard Wallace’s offer to sell the tenants their holdings at twenty years’ purchase.

MEETING AT DUNDROD.

On Saturday evening, 21st inst., a large and representative meeting of the tenant farmers residing in the Parish of Tullyrusk was held in the Dundrod National School, to take into consideration Sir R. Wallace’s proposal to sell to them their holdings. The Rev. McBride, having been called to preside, briefly introduced the subject. Mr. Charles Bamford was requested to act as secretary. Mr. William Higginson proposed, and Mr. W.J. McKnight seconded, a resolution offering Sir Richard Wallace 18 years’ purchase, on condition that he forgave the tenants one years rent. An amendment, proposed by Mr. Shaw Armstrong, seconded by Mr. W.J. Herdman, to the effect that Sir Richard be offered 20 years’ purchase, on condition that he forgave all arrears, having been put to the meeting and declared lost, the original motion was passed unanimously. All present manifested a strong desire to purchase on reasonable terms. Messrs. W. Higginson, Shaw Armstrong, and William J. McKnight were appointed as a deputation to meet on Tuesday in Lisburn with the delegates from other districts, to lay their proposal before Mr. Capron. Having arranged to meet in the same place next Saturday evening to receive the report of their deputies, the meeting separated.

THE PURCHASE PROPOSAL AT LISBURN

A discussion took place in Lisburn on Tuesday 24th September, 1889 and a suggestion had been made to Mr. Capron, the agent of Sir Richard Wallace, that each parish should make its own terms.

A Mr. Green told the meeting in Lisburn that the he had proposed to those present at a meeting in Ballinderry, that 15 years’ purchase may be acceptable.

Mr. Frazer stated that at the meeting in Glenavy, the tenants had agreed to offer 18 years’ purchase; at Magheragall, 17½ years’; at Magheramesk, 17½ years; at Aghagallon, 17½ years’; at Aghalee, 17½ years’; at Ballinderry, 16 years’, and at Derriaghy, 18 years’.

Mr Green referred to the difficulty as to the difference in rent. Taking Ballinderry, and comparing it with other portions of the estate, he thought that farmers had strong grounds for exceptional treatment. In some districts, 25 years’ purchase would be enough to pay. Money was made now by pasture, making butter, &co., and not by growing cereals. He hoped Mr. Capron would consider the suffering tenants.

At the end of this meeting a proposal was made stating:

“That this committee having met Mr. Capron, and having heard Sir Richard Wallace’s reply, to the effect that his offer of 20 years’ purchase is final, hereby express the opinion that the tenantry are not in a position to accept it; and on their behalf beg to thank him for the fortnight’s extension of time which he has given them to consider it.”

Death Notice — Susanna Watters

The following extract is from The Lisburn Standard Saturday February 1st 1890

Deaths: January 22 at her late residence, Budore, Dundrod, Susanna, wife of James Watters.

Death Notice — David Mairs

Extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated Belfast — Monday June 27th 1892 with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Deaths:

MAIRS – June 24, from the effects of a fall from his cart, David Mairs, of Dundrod. Interment in Dundrod Burying-ground, this day (Monday), at twelve o’clock noon.

McCullough v Great Northern Railway Company

The following is an extract from The Belfast News Letter, Tuesday June 28th 1892. Thanks to the Belfast News Letter for permission to use this extract.

Belfast Quarter Sessions.
McCullough v. Great Northern Railway Company.

In this case Joseph McCullough, Dundrod, County Antrim, sued the Great Northern Railway Company to recover the sum of £12 for loss and damage sustained by the plaintiff for that the defendants, by themselves or by their servants, so carelessly and negligently drove an engine through the Central Railway Tunnel, at the Donegall Quay, on the 24th November, 1891, without having a signalman in advance, whereby a cow, the property of the plaintiff, was knocked down and killed, by reason whereof the plaintiff suffered loss in the amount sued for, and for consequential damages.

Mr. Thomas Harrison, Barrister-in-Law (Instructed by Mr. Frank Kerr), appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr. J. McLean represented the defendants.

It appeared that the plaintiff and his servants were driving seventeen cattle from Queen Square to the Central Railway yard. When passing the subway of the railway one of the animals broke away from the herd and ran down to the tunnel. At that time an engine was coming up the tunnel, and, as alleged, at a very rapid rate, whereby it came in contact with the cow, and killed it.

For the defence it was contended that the animal had trespassed on the grounds of the defendants.

His Honour held that the plaintiff had not sufficient men to look after the cattle.

The case was dismissed.

The Court adjourned till half-past ten this morning.

Farmers Disappointed

The following is from the Belfast Newsletter dated Tuesday 19th June 1894 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

The crops in Dundrod and Tullyrusk District –

This season opened auspiciously, but so far as can be at present judged, the farmers are disappointed. The genial and mild weather was succeeded by two nights of heavy frost, followed by cold winds. The natural result is that the crops have a stunted look, which does not speak well for the coming harvest. Potatoes generally were not far advanced when the frost came, and thus they did not suffer so severely here as in the earlier districts. Notwithstanding this fact, the crop is far behind that of last year, and if the weather does not soon become more favourable a very light return of the valuable esculent may be expected. Too have an average crop plenty of sunshine and a full season’s growth would be required. The crop of oats has suffered very much. Frost and wet combined have left many plots in anything but a healthy condition, very dry and strong land being an exception to this rule. Meadows (grass and upland) have suffered, perhaps, more severely than any other crop, especially where the land is poor. Farmers, if it is right to say, never had more positive proof of the value of drainage and plenty of manure than this year affords. As the last crop was light, and did not exhaust the land, there is likely to be a heavier field than in 1893. Turnips were late, and did not, therefore, suffer much from the heavy frost, but constant cold is keeping them back. This crop can never be a success without plenty of sunshine, and that is just what it is not getting at present. A change in the weather, however, would have a good effect, and the agriculturalists are living in hope of summer days. It may be said that no flax is sown here at all, nor any wheat. A large proportion of the land is grass, and here the frost told injuriously. Happily there is no crop can recover from its effects so easily as the grazing. As soon as the cattle nip off the frosted part the blades soon recover their healthy condition. On the whole the outlook is not encouraging. With a continuance of cold it means failure all round. Milk and butter are the commodities chiefly depended on in this district, and as they are now selling at a ruinous price, the prospects for the coming winter are not bright. There is, however, little use in indulging in gloomy forebodings. A few weeks of heat and genial sunshine would cause such a delightful change that an average or even an abundant harvest would be the result.

Bridge Repair

Extract from The Lisburn Standard — Saturday November, 17th 1900

Lisburn Rural District Council Quarterly meeting held at the Workhouse, Lisburn on Thursday.

One of the motions taken up included… “By Councillor Graham – to repair a bridge on the road from Belfast to Glenavy, in the town lands of Dundrod and Knockcairn, at Mrs. McCullough’s. Probable cost £3 10s. District charge – passed.”

Dundrod Farm Sales

Extract from The Lisburn Herald — January 28, 1905

Property Sales

Farm in Dundrod, the property of the late Thomas Boomer, containing about 12 statute acres, and subject to an annuity to the Irish Land Commission of £5 8s 6d; Miss Officer was the purchaser at £210. Messrs W.G. Maginess and Joseph Lockhart, Lisburn; and Moorehead & Wood, Galway & Beattie, M.Wylie, and Thomas Barkley Belfast were the solicitors having carriage of the several sales.

Extract from The Lisburn Herald — February 3rd, 1906

Budore, Dundrod, Co. Antrim.
(Six miles from Belfast, six Lisburn, three Glenavy)

Mr. James Smyth (who has gone to Belfast)
Has instructed us to Sell By Auction at
Our property mart, 63 Chichester
Street, Belfast, on Friday, 16th February, at
One o’clock.
That Valuable Farm of Land, situate
In the Townland of Budore, County Antrim
Containing 37a 1r 24p., statute measure, held in
Fee-simple, subject to the payment to the Irish
Land Commission of an annuity of £14 0s 4d
Second decade. The Lands are of superior quality,
Well watered, drained, and fenced, and laid down
In Pasture and Meadow.
There are a very comfortable Dwelling-house
And suitable slated Office-houses on the Farm.
F.J. Orr , Solicitor, 43 Chichester Street, Belfast
J.D. Martin & Co., Auctioneers, 63,
Chichester Street, Belfast; and Lisburn.

Auction of Stock

The following extract is from the Lisburn Herald dated 9th March 1912

Dundrod, Co. Antrim. Auction of Stock, hay and implements.

Mr. John Gore, (having sold his farm) have instructed us to sell by auction, on the premises, on Wednesday, 20th March, at 10.30 o’clock.

4 Good Cows (2 springing, 1 calved and 1 Stripper), useful pony, trap and harness, sow and 10 young pigs, 2 young sows, pike of meadow hay, farm cart and harness, reaping machine by Woods, ploughs, harrows, barn fanners, a quantity of household furniture and sundries.

Terms – proved credit on sums of £3 and upwards, or discount for cash; sums under £3 cash. Purchasers to pay auction commission.

J.D. Martin & Co., Auctioneers.

Street Directory

In the 1915 Belfast Street Directory, the following is listed as a “Guardian” within the Lisburn District:

David Patterson, Dundrod – for Tullyrusk

Farm for Sale

The following extract is from the Lisburn Herald dated 20th January 1917.

Nelsonsland, Dundrod
Auction of farm

I am instructed by the executors of the late Mr. Archibald McCullough to sell by auction at my Belfast Mart on Friday 2nd Feb 1917 at one o’clock.

That valuable farm situate as above containing 13a 2r 12p statute, held in fee-simple, subject to an annuity of £4 15s 6d to the Irish Land Commission. There is an excellent Meadow on the farm containing about 4 acres, and the remainder is pasture land of very superior quality. The lands adjoin the County Road leading from Ligoniel to Dundrod.

For title &c., apply to
Gibson Barron, solicitor, Royal Avenue, Belfast
W.S. Harvey, Auctioneer, Belfast and Lisburn.

Temperance Band

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Herald, Saturday July 7th 1917.

Dundrod Temperance Band.
To the Editor of the Lisburn Herald.

Sir – To avoid any misunderstanding I should like to mention that the Band which visited Lisburn in connection with the Brownlee Bazaar last week, and which was described in the report of the bazaar as being from Glenavy, was the Dundrod Temperance Brass Band. Permit me also to take this opportunity of expressing the members appreciation of the kindly reception accorded them. – Arthur G. Camp (Bandmaster), Avey Lodge, Glenavy.

James Brown Fined

Extract from The Lisburn Herald Saturday, June 1st, 1918

At Belfast Summons Court, on Monday, James Brown, Dundrod, was fined £5 for selling buttermilk containing an excess of water.

Arthur McKendry’s fatal fall

The following extract is from the Lisburn Standard 27th June 1924.

Dundrod Man’s Fatal Fall
While whitewashing his dwelling-house.

On Monday afternoon, while whitewashing at his home, Dundrod, Arthur McKendry, a farmer, aged 75, fell six feet, and was so injured that he died shortly afterwards. It is believed that he struck the bucket in the fall; anyhow it was found that he had broken one of his ribs and this penetrated the lung with fatal results.

Dr. Hunter, Crumlin, was hastened to the scene, but medical skill was unavailing and deceased passed away in the doctor’s presence.

At the inquest held the following day, a verdict of accidental death was returned, and the coroner (Dr. Mussen) and jury expressed sincere sympathy with deceased’s wife and two daughters. Mr Samuel Johnston was foreman of the jury, and Sergeant Gallagher, Crumlin represented the Crown. The late Mr McKendry was held in the greatest respect among his friends and neighbours, this fact being borne out by the very large attendance at the funeral on Wednesday, which tool place to Dundrod Presbyterian Churchyard. Prior to the funeral a service was conducted in the bereaved home by Rev Mr Jamison, M.A. Loan Ends Presbyterian Church, Killead, and the same clergyman officiated at the graveside.

Wrongful Hedge Cutting

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Herald Saturday January 26th 1929

Lisburn Quarter Sessions
Cutting down a hedge

William McCullough Mairs, farmer, sought to recover from William Garrett, farmer, Knockcairn, £20 damages, for that defendant or his servants entered on plaintiff’s land in Dundrod, County Antrim, and cut down a hedge, the property of the plaintiff, to his loss in the above sum.

Mr. B Maginess, B.L. (instructed by W G Maginess & Son) appeared for the plaintiff and Mr Isaac Copeland B.L. (instructed by George McIldowie & Son, Belfast) for the defendant.

His Honour, having heard the witnesses on either side, said the defendant was entitled to pass over the road with his horse and cart for use on his farm, and if the hedge projected so as to make that almost impossible he was entitled to make it right. It had been arranged that the hedge should be kept clipped. His Honour did not think that in any event the plaintiff had suffered extensive damage, and therefore on the whole the action should be dismissed.

Extract from The Lisburn Herald, Saturday, March 9th 1929.

Farmers and a hedge.

In the King’s Bench Division, on 1st inst. Lord Justice Andrews reversed the decision of the County Court Judge of Antrim in an action brought by Wm. McC. Mairs, farmer of Knockcairn, Dundrod, against Wm. Garrett, farmer, of the same place, to recover damages for the alleged wrongful cutting of a hedge. Judgement had been given for the defendant.

Mr. B. Maginess (instructed by Messrs. W.G. Maginess & Son) appeared for the plaintiff and appellant; and Mr. I. Copeland (instructed by Messrs. George McIldowie & Son) for the defendant and respondent.

His Lordship held that any licence which might have been given prior to 1927 was then withdrawn. He reversed the finding of the County Court Judge, and awarded £2 damages.

Dundrod Bird Life

Extract from The Lisburn Herald, August 24, 1929.

Bird Life At Dundrod

I spent a weekend at Dundrod, County Antrim, recently, and, though it rained most of the time I was there, I had quite an interesting time out of doors being attracted particularly by the bird life. The Missel Thrushes, who have been formed into small flocks, are most numerous in this district. They are not unlike the Fieldfare which will arrive later on, though their general mode of feeding and habits differ somewhat. The chatter of the magpies was also constantly to be heard. A general state of warfare seemed exist between the Magpies and the Missel Thrushes, for I saw them pursuing each other through the belt of trees.

Along the banks of the Crumlin river, too, one had splendid opportunities of studying many kinds of birds. Dippers, with their young, were continually on the move, and while I was fishing one of these birds almost caught on my hook as it flashed down the river. At another point along the stream I came upon a family party of young King Fishers, perched on the stump of a tree awaiting the return of their parents. Quite spick and span they looked, and when the old birds returned every member of the party was quite ready for the food allowed to him.

Then I heard the renewed song of the Willow Warbler, for this bird is one of the view species which regain their song after the moulting season. An old Whitethroat was fussing about the hedgerow, as only a warbler in charge of a family can. As I approached she uttered a harsh croak. Of course it was not the bird’s intention to inform me that the family were “out for an airing;” but nevertheless I knew the young must be somewhere in the vicinity. I had only to part the branches of a bush, when I saw the loveliest little cluster of birdlets, all sitting quite close together, side by side, looking quite evidently much perturbed in my direction. I dropped the branch gently and moved away. A little later I returned, but in the meantime the cunning little mother had secretly transferred her brood to another bush. The calls of the Corncrake and Cuckoo I did not hear, for the former bird is busy attending to the wants of its young, and the latter has flown to other lands.

Despite reports that the Swallows are not so plentiful in the district this year, they appeared to be very common. On every outbuilding of farm houses which I visited I found them nesting freely, and one evening I watched the birds lying about with their young in hundreds. House Martins and Swifts are also to be observed, but no Sand Martins.

The wild flowers are most interesting in this district. The Willow Herb grows in profusion, and the roadsides are gay with the Agrimony blooms, interspersed with Yarrow and Bedstraw.

“T. McC.”

Anice Brett charged with Larceny

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Standard dated Friday 29th August 1930.

DUBLIN RESIDENT CHARGED AT CRUMLIN WITH LARCENY

“I plead guilty”

At Crumlin yesterday, before Mr. T.J. English, J.P., D.I. Fletcher charged Anice Brett, Portabello, Dublin with stealing clothing and jewellery, value £31 and £2 8s in silver, the property of Eleanor Rankin, Dundrod.

Mrs. Eleanor Rankin, stated that the defendant was a domestic servant in her employment since Newry Fair on 14th August. On 27th August witness missed the defendant, and on making enquiries and searching her premises she missed a gold wristlet watch, about £2 15s in silver and also a quantity of clothing. She identified the articles (produced) as her property. She gave the defendant no permission to take any of the articles.

Constable George Malone, Crumlin gave evidence to the effect that, in pursuance of information received he had proceeded to the town land of Ballydonaghy and there he arrested the accused, and she made the following statement “I plead guilty to taking the watch, money and clothing.”

He found the following articles in her possession – one full dress, a three-piece knitted woollen suit, 1 woollen jumper, 1 lady’s vest, a light dress, 1 lady’s pale underwear, 3 pairs of stockings, 1 black silk underskirt, 1 overall, 1 black overcoat, and 1 black evening dress. She was wearing a black pair of shoes. She handed witness a gold wristlet watch and he saw her throw something into a ditch. Witness found there £1 2s in silver and she gave him 12s 9d. All the articles had been identified by Mrs. Rankin. Mr. English returned the accused for trial in custody to the County Antrim Quarter Sessions.

Bazaar at Rushyhill L.O.L. 1940

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Standard dated Friday 10th April 1931

Rushyhill L.O.L. 1940

A bazaar was opened in the Orange Hall at Rush hill (Colin), near Lisburn on Easter Monday, for the purpose of raising funds to renovate the building. The undertaking was under the auspices of L.O.L. 1940 and it met with most generous support.

The stalls were well laden with a choice selection of goods, and the revenue from these was considerably augmented by the patronage extended to a number of side attractions.

R.W. Bro Robert Armstrong, J.P., D.C.G.M., Belfast and D.G.M.I., who presided, thanked the brethren for the invitation given him, and said he was delighted to be present to give them whatever assistance he could. It was difficult for a lodge, situated as theirs was, in a mixed district to make all the headway desirable in raising funds. In the Orange Hall, Clifton Street, Belfast, matters were different. There were about 200 lodges and preceptories met, and with 8000 to 10000 brethren attending they had no lack of funds. In that district the lodge meeting there stood alone. He was pleased to see them so well assisted by the ladies, and he was sure that project would be a great success. (Applause)

Mrs. J. Rankin, Tullyrusk, Dundrod, introduced by the chairman as president of the Dundrod Women’s Unionist Association, formally declared the bazaar open, and hoped it would be the means of realising all the funds required.
On the motion of Bro Robert Armstrong, junior, seconded by Bro. William Geddis, a hearty vote of thanks was accorded to Mrs Rankin, and on the proposition of Bro. Thompson, W.D.M. Dundrod, seconded by Bro. Tinsley, a similar compliment was paid to Bro. Armstrong.

Sales were then commenced and carried on with briskness during the remainder of the evening.

Samual Dalton marries Miss E McDowell

The following is an extract from the Lisburn Standard dated 7th August 1931

Pretty Wedding at Dundrod

At Dundrod Presbyterian Church. County Antrim, a pretty wedding took place on Tuesday. The contracting parties were Mr. Samuel Dalton, eldest son of Mr. A. Dalton and the late Mrs. Dalton,. Crumlin, and Miss E Mc Dowell, only daughter of Mr. And Mrs. James McDowell, Hillview, Dundrod.

The bridegroom was attended by Messrs. F. McDowell and Glover, while the bridesmaids were Misses Baird and Dalton.

Rev. D. McKinney returned from holidays to officiate.

The bride looked charming in a beautiful dress of ivory georgette, and carried a bouquet of sweetpea and carnations. She was given away by her father.

As the party entered the church the organist (Miss Graham) played the Wedding March. Subsequently a reception was held at Hillview.

The happy couple later left for the North of England, where the honeymoon is being spent.

Joint Milk Council Nomination

The following extract is from the Lisburn Herald Saturday November 23rd 1935

Mr. George Thompson, J.P., Dundrod, has been nominated for election to Joint Milk Council of Northern Ireland.

For Sale by Mr Robert Dawson

The following extract if from The Belfast News Letter dated Friday October, 16th 1942 and is reproduced by kind permission of the Belfast News Letter

Tullyrusk, Dundrod

Sale Monday, 2 0’clock. 4 cows, 5 calves, 26 cocks hay, ½ acre potatoes, farm cart, set cart harness, one horse chill plough, plough chains, harrow, Rundlets, crocks, potato sprayer. Usual credit. On premises, for Mr Robert Dawson.

J.D. Martin & Co., F.V.I.
Auctioneers,69 Chichester Street, and Lisburn.

Call for Tenders

The following extract is from The Lisburn Standard 2 January 1953

Tenders invited for 18 houses at Dundrod by Lisburn District Council. Plans and specifications prepared by W.B. Maxwell A.R.I.B.A., M.R.I.A.I., Chartered Architect, 5 University Terrace, Belfast.

Deceased Estate – Sale by Auction

The following extract is from The Ulster Star dated 28th January 1961 and appears with permission of The Ulster Star.

Dundrod, Crumlin, Co. Antrim

Preliminary Notice. Sale by Auction. Attractive Small Holding.
Area 5 acres and 7 perches – annuity £1-17-2 – with dwelling and out-offices.

On the premises at above on Saturday, 11th February, at two o’clock p.m.

By instructions the Exors. Late Annie McKendry – deceased.

W.G. Maginess & Son, Solicitors, Lisburn

David Mairs,
Auctioneer & Valuer, 8 Bridge Street, Lisburn. Tel. Lisburn 3128

Killultagh Hunt

The following extract is from The Ulster Star dated March 1961 and appears with permission of the The Ulster Star.

Hunt looks after the young.

Mr. J. Manderson and Mrs. M. Nicholson joint Masters of The Hunt with Raymond Nicholson

Mr. J. Manderson and Mrs. M. Nicholson joint Masters of The Hunt with Raymond Nicholson

One hundred and thirty years old – but with the virility of a toddler. That is the Killultagh Hunt which, for all its antiquity, does not forget the younger enthusiasts, and there is a thriving pony club of about 60 children. Gymkhanas and rallies are organised for the children during the school holidays.

A “Star” reporter this week learned something of the history and future plans of the hunt from the joint-master, Mr. J.F. Manderson.

“It was at a meeting held in the Hertford Arms in Lisburn in February 1832 that it was decided to establish the Killultagh Hunt,” Mr. Manderson said.

“The first meeting was in November of that year.”

“With the numbers declining in the Old Rock and Chichester Hunt, their members applied in 1878 to amalgamate with us and that is how we became the Killultagh, Old Rock and Chichester Harriers.”

The Killultagh, Old Rock and Chichester Harriers before setting out on this week's hunt

The Killultagh, Old Rock and Chichester Harriers before setting out on this week’s hunt

Mrs. M. Nicholson, of Muckamore, is the other joint-master and her family has long been connected with the Killultagh.

Her father was master at one time and her 14 year-old son, Raymond is now a member.

Mr. Ernest Taylor, the huntsman, lives at the new kennels at Dundrod.

Mr Walter Weinger

Mr Walter Weinger

This is the third “home” for the hunt’s kennels. They were at one time in Lisburn, where they are commemorated by the road bearing the name “Kennel Lane”. Later the kennels were moved to Antrim and recently their new home at Dundrod.

Things are easier for the hounds now in comparison with years ago when they were liable to be the victims of diseases nowadays virtually unknown.

Mr. Manderson talked of the time in 1890 when “dumb madness” broke out and destroyed the whole pack of about 20 couples, leaving only a few puppies “out at walk” – those being reared away from the pack.

The 40 members look very colourful setting out for a day’s hunting.

Bowlers

The Hon Mrs Terence O'Neill

The Hon Mrs Terence O’Neill

Some like Mr. Taylor and Mr. Issac Nelson, of Glenavy, who is the “whip” wear the traditional “hunting pink”, others are in the more sober but just as striking-looking black hunting outfits, and the ladies look so well in their “bowlers” that it seems a pity this shape of hat is not popular as fashion wear off the hunting field.

Graceful Figure

One of the few to ride side-saddle is the Hon. Mrs. Terence O’Neill who was out with the Killultagh this week.
She made a most graceful figure as she sat erect on her mount with her hunting skirt flowing in the breeze.

Riding one of the largest mounts this week was Mr. Walter Weinger, a very keen member of the hunt.

The next big item on the programme for the hunt members is the point-to-point races at Glenavy in April and, of course there is the annual ball during Balmoral Show week.

“Lisburn Rural District, Co. Antrim Official Guide, 1967”

The following is an extract from Lisburn Rural District, Co. Antrim Official Guide c.1967

Dundrod. In the very north of the rural district on the direct road from Lisburn to Antrim, Dundrod is an attractive village not far from the Nutt’s Corner airfield (in Antrim Rural District.) This rather flat country between the Belfast Hills and Lough Neagh has for many years been the venue of an annual motorcycle race. The route includes a famous seven mile straight, ending in a hairpin bend and has several other very fast straight stretches. For a while this race was the fastest road race on earth, speeds of over a hundred miles an hour being commonplace. The race – The Ulster Grand Prix – is held on the Dundrod Circuit in August and attracts many competitors and even more spectators. In 1948 the Grand Prix de Europe took place on this course.

South of Dundrod is the village of Stoneyford, the latter a centre of many by-roads. Stoneyford is at the foot of the Belfast hills and close by is a large reservoir whose still waters reflect the smooth hillsides.

Harold Gray wins trophies at Belfast Musical Festival

Mr Harold Gray from Dundrod

Mr Harold Gray, a farmer from Dundrod, with the Rose Bowl and Belfast Cup which he won at Belfast Musical Festival. He won the Bessie McKisack prize for Oratorio and the Philip H. Hinds Cup for bass solo. (Date and source unknown)

The following is from a newspaper cutting, date and source unknown.

Festival Vocalist wins his fourth cup.
Mr. Harold Gray’s Triumphal March.

Since Saturday it has been a triumphal march at the Belfast Musical festival for Mr. Harold Gray, Dundrod. He already holds four trophies. Entered for the first vocal contest of the Festival, he won the Philip Hinds Cup for soloists on Saturday morning. This qualified him to contest the Rose Bowl.

On Monday he was awarded the Bessis McKisack Prize for Oratorio. On Tuesday evening he won both the Belfast Cup and the Rose Bowl.

Three of these trophies, the Rose Bowl, the Belfast Cup and the McKisack Prize, carry the obligation to compete for the Thompson Memorial Championship, the highest award of the Festival. This will be decided on Saturday.
Other competitors for the championship are the winners of the Ulster Cup, and of the John Patterson Cup for operatic solo.
Mr. gray has not entered for the Ulster Cup, the winner of which will not be announced till Saturday evening.
He has, however entered for the Patterson Cup on Thursday.

Days Like This – Edward Bell

This link will take you to the BBC Radio Ulster where you can hear the story of an aircraft that crashed in this area during the Second World War. Edward Bell, a resident of the area, relates the story.

Listen to Edward at Days Like This – Edward Bell

PRONI Will Calendars

The following information is taken from the will calendars in the PRONI and are reproduced with kind permission of Deputy Keeper of the Records, Public Record Office of Northern Ireland.

John Thompson

Date of Death 17/08/1877
Date of Grant 17/02/1879
Effects under £300
Registry: Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of John Thompson late of Dundrod County Antrim Farmer deceased who died 17 August 1877 at same place was proved at Belfast by the oath of Hugh Tinsley of Ballymacward (Dundrod) same County Farmer one of the Executors.

When the Past met the Present

David Webber from Canada and Edward Bell from Dundrod

David Webber, from Canada and Edward Bell from Dundrod pictured recently at the Bell family burial ground, Killead Presbyterian Church. They are both descendants of Alexander Bell, whose death in 1837 is the first inscription on the Bell headstone.

Several months ago I had received an email from David Webber, a Canadian who was researching his ancestors. He believed that his grandmother, Maria Bell, had been born on a farm located at Tullyrusk, Glenavy. David was in possession of letters from the early 1930’s indicating that there were other family in the Killead area.

David’s great grandmother, Jane (nee Cormican) was the first wife of William Alexander Bell from Tullyrusk. He was in fact the grandson of the Alexander Bell of Tully. Fortunately details of this Bell family are captured in the rare surviving remnants of the 1851 census. This particular Bell family can all be traced back to the townlands of Tully and Ballynageeragh in the Killead area.

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Founderings, Fleams and Farcy
by The Digger

The following article by “The Digger” was published in the Ulster Star dated Friday 10th January, 2014.

Fleam

Fleam

I discovered a little gem a number of years ago in the form of a handwritten notebook. It is in the possession of a local family in the district and contains golden nuggets of information recording material relative to everyday life in a rural farming community in the early to late 19th century.

Several pages were devoted to seventeen different cures and remedies gleaned from some neighbouring farmers and meticulously recorded by the note taker. A number of the entries were attributed to a Mr. Gilliland who is believed to have resided in the Ballydonaghy townland in the Crumlin area.

Common diseases in cattle, sheep and horse are touched on and there are “potions” suggesting cures for fresh cuts and wounds, inflammation, scratches, sheep scab, sore heels, strains and worms. The entries include a variety of chemicals, herbs and lotions available to the 19th century farmer.

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