Whitemountain Townland, Stoneyford

"White Mountain" Farm to be Let

The following is from the Belfast Newsletter dated Tue 15 th Mar – Fri 18th Mar 1774 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

To be fet, for fuch Term as fhall be agreed on, a Farm called White Mountain, containing eighty Englifh Acres, fituate on the great Road leading from Lifburn to Antrim, and two Miles from the former; The Land is in a state of Nature, capable of being improved as a fmall Expence, as there are two Lime-kilns built on the Premiffes, and Limeftone very convienient; there are alfo two Stone and Lime Dwelling – Houfes on the Farm. Apply to Edward Gayer of Derriaghy, near Lifburn.

Dated this 18th of March, 1774. And to be continued till the Stamp Act commences.

Ordnance Survey Memoirs

The following extract is from "Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland – Parishes of County Antrim II 1832 – 1838". Thanks to The Institute of Irish Studies, The Queen’s University of Belfast for permission to use this extract.

Parish of Derryaghy

White Mountain Fort

In White Mountain and holding of George McCourt there stands the ruins of a fort approaching to circular shape, 50 yards in diameter. The remaining portion of the parapet, which was of clay, is 2 feet high and 7 feet thick. All is now in grazing.

White Mountain Standing Stone

In White Mountain and holding of Anthony Watson there is at present in a sloping position an ancient stone column 4 feet long, 2 and a half feet broad and 1 and a half feet thick, and a few other stones lying about it.

Querns and weapon.

There stands at present in Richard Willes’ house, White mountain, 2 old quern stones, each 13 and a half inches in diameter and 1 and a half inch thick. The circular hole in the runner is 3 inches in diameter and 2 smaller holes for handles to turn it with. These quern stones were found in 1829 about 2 feet beneath the surface of a bog in the above mountain.

Richard Willes, White Mountain, got in 1827 about 3 feet beneath the surface of a bog in the above mountain an ancient weapon of the annexed shape (text drawing), as described. It was of steel and iron, and void in the centre, as shown by the draft. It was 20 inches across the shoulders and 20 inches from the shoulder to the point, and thin and sharp along the edges. The solid part shows the tang that went into the handle. It weighed between 21 and 28lbs. It is supposed to have been stolen from the owner. Informant William Willes.

Plover Plain

The Plover plain on the summit of Whitemountain is a flat sheet of heathy garb where large flocks of plovers resort and constantly inhabit. It was also a favourite site to hold inspections and reviews of yeomanry corps of horse and foot for many years.

King James’ Chair and tradition

King James’ Chair in the above (White) mountain is also in Mr Watson’s farm and is situated in the face of a rocky eminence in the east side of the hill. It in great measure resembles the old 2 armed chair, but wholly formed in the rock. The seat is 3 feet long, 1 and a half feet broad and 1 and a half feet high. The back reclines backward and is 2 and a half feet high. The arms also reclines on either side and is nearly as high above the seat as the back of the chair. Whether art be combined with nature in the construction of this chair or not, it would suit the purpose of a chair very well, and from its eminence commands a good prospect north, east and south. It is said to have been occupied at some period by King James. Informants John McCafferty and others.

Markets

White Mountain: markets Lisburn and Belfast; conveyance: cars and carts: prices: 1s per cwt for potatoes, 10d for oats; charges for conveyance; 2d per cwt to Lisburn, 7d to Belfast; produce: potatoes and oats; soil light, gravely soil; manures: dung and lime; surface: south part is a mountain and falls gently to north west; flax: little or none; spinning: a good deal of spinning, about 2d per diem can be made at it; weaving: a good deal of calico; pasture land: the greater part of the town land; limestone in this town land, basalt in this town land; average produce: 180 bushels of potatoes per English acre, oats 30 to 35 bushels per acre of from 42 to 46 pounds per bushel.

Application for Freehold

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 8th October 1830 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

County of Antrim – list of persons applying to register their freeholds at a general quarter sessions of the peace to be held at Belfast on the 25th day of October, for the division of Carrickfergus, pursuant to the Act of 10th Geo. IV. Cap.8.

Number 46 Name and residence of applicant: J. Graham, Description of Freehold with the names of Barony and Townland in which situated: White Mountain Houses and land. Upper Massereene, Townland of Whitemountain Yearly value to be registered: £10

Marriage Notice — James Graham and Jane Clarke

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 21st September 1841 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Marriage

On the 17th inst., by the Rev. H. Leebody, Ballinderry, Mr. James Graham, Whitemountain, to Miss Jane Clarke, Maragall.

Drowning Accident

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 10th January 1843 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Melancholy Accident – We regret to state that Mr. R. Cahoon of White Mountain, farmer and lime burner, was drowned in the canal at Lisburn, on Tuesday night last. The unfortunate man had been at the quay on business, and did not get his affairs settled till about seven o’clock, when he was last seen. His hat was found next morning, and immediate search was made for the body all that day and the succeeding one, the water having been drawn off for that purpose; however. It was only yesterday morning his remains were found in the canal at the quay. It does not appear that intoxication was anyways the cause of this accident. The unfortunate man has left a wife and four children; and, what is very lamentable, some time since he had a fine little boy burned to death.

Lightning Kills Cow

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 9th June 1851 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Lisburn June 5 – A cow killed by Lightning – yesterday some very heavy hail showers fell in this neighbourhood, accompanied with lightning and peals of thunder, by which a cow was killed on the White Mountain two miles from Lisburn, the electric fluid having struck her. She was the property of Mr. W. graham, a brewer in Lisburn. It is little more than a month since a young girl, on the other side of Lisburn about the same distance, was killed in the same way (the weather being of much the same sort), and just beside a farm that Mr. Graham had there also, one being in the County of Antrim and the other in the County of Down.

Killultagh Harriers

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 25th February 1858 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Killultagh Harriers – meets for March 1858 – Twelve o’clock – Wednesday 3 at Crawley’s Whins (White Mountain)…

Killultagh Harriers

The following is an extract from the Belfast News Letter dated 28th February 1858 and appears with permission of the Belfast News Letter.

Killultagh harriers – Meets for March 1858 – twelve o’clock – Wednesday 3, at Crawley’s Whins, (White Mountain); Saturday 6, at Dundrod; Wednesday 10, at Brown Moss; Saturday 13, at Tullyrush; Wednesday 17, at Whinny Hill; Saturday 20, at Rock Chapel, Wednesday 24, at Trench House; Saturday 27, at Knockcairn; Wednesday 31, at Ballypitmave.

Hertford Estate Rejoicings

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 10th February 1859 and is used with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Rejoicings on the Hertford Estate.

When it became known on Tuesday last that the lady of W.T. Stannus, Esq., J.P., Lisburn, had given birth to a son and heir, the tenantry on the Hertford estate assembled in large numbers on yesterday evening to manifest their respect and gratitude towards the family, by kindling large bonfires on the range of hills extending from Aughrim towards Glenavy. Tar barrels blazed on Bannister’s Hill, Whitemountain, Aughrim, Crew Hill, Carnkilly, Sentry Hill and other places. Many hearty cheers were given, which broke the dull ear of night, and were echoed far and wide amid the Glens of Stoneyford, and the adjacent districts. Such demonstrations as these give a sure indication of the state of public opinion on the estate. The agent of the Hertford Estate is deservedly popular amongst all classes of the tenantry. They have always found him to be a gentleman in the highest sense of the term, willing at all times to investigate their claims in a fair, free and full manner. The best proof of this is that great improvements are taking place on the estate, and the sweet power of cultivation appears, when formerly there was nothing but a dismal swamp, or a barren heath. This is not the only time on which the tenantry of this great property manifested their respect and esteem for the agent. On the occasion of his marriage with a lady of high rank, they presented him with a valuable service of plate, and gave a dinner at which were present, not only the respectable and influential men of all parties on the estate, but also many gentlemen from the adjacent districts. Such demonstrations of regard indicate a sound state of things, and furnish a pleasing picture of the mutual confidence and good-will which prevail between the agent and tenantry of one of the largest properties in Ireland.

Honouring the Prince of Wales

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 14th March 1863 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

The Loyalty of Lisburn.

There was a report in the Belfast newsletter about the honouring of the Prince of Wales marriage on the 10th. … tar barrels blazing forth from the top of the "White Mountain," Castlerobin, Aughrim, and Collin Mountains could be seen for many miles around.

Road Repairs Approved

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 10th May 1869 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Lisburn Presentment Sessions,

The Summer Presentment Sessions for the Barony of Upper Massereene was held today at Lisburn.

The justices present were – Walter T. Stannus, Esq., D.L., J.P., (Chairman), and Charles Douglass Esq., J.P., and the Associated Cesspayers, George P. Johnson, Esq., Ballymacash; and bennett Megarry, Esq.

The following are the principal presentments which were considered, with the amount allowed in each case….

….12 – To repair 400 perches of road from Belfast to Glenavy, by Cahoon’s limekilns, between Jefferson’s kilns, and the Ballymacash Road, in the town land of Whitemountain. Approved at £7.….

27th Annual Cattle Show

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 3rd August 1871 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

The Belfast Newsletter reported on the 27th annual cattle show of Killultagh and Derryvolgie Farming Society which was held in the Grain Market, Lisburn on Thursday 27th July.

Prize List –

Class U – Best firkin, half firkin or crock of butter – farmers 1st prize – Robert Armstrong, White Mountain.

Extra Class – Milch cows for the mountain districts – farmers – 1st prize, Robert Armstrong, White Mountain; 2nd – John Waring, Derriaghy; 3rd Robert Armstrong, White Mountain.

Road Maintenance

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 12th February 1873 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

County of Antrim List of Applications not contracted for at sessions, to be tendered for at Spring Assizes.

Upper Massereene

…5. To keep in repair for 3 years 800 perches of road from Belfast to Glenavy, by the sheepwalk, between Anthony Watson’s and the new Glenavy Road, in the town land of White mountain – yearly. Cost not to exceed £60.

Best Broad Sow

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 10th August 1877 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

The Belfast Newsletter reported on a cattle show at Lisburn. It was the 33rd annual show of the Lillultagh and Derryvolgie Farming Society and was held in the gain market, Lisburn.

Class Q – for the best brrod sow – 1st Richard Thompson, Maze; 2nd Robert Armstrong, Whitemountain.

Drag Hounds

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 20th March 1878 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Drag Hounds – These hounds will meet at the White Mountain, on to-morrow (Thursday), at one o’clock p.m.

McKeown v Willis

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 28th July 1879 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Assize Intelligence.
McKeown v Willis

This was an action for assault. The parties reside near the White Mountain, Damages were laid at £300.

Counsel for the plaintiff – Mr. Andrew Q.C., and Mr. Weir (instructed by Mr Wellington Young.). Counsel for the defendant – Mr. Porter Q.C., Mr Monroe Q.C., and Mr. Dodd (instructed by Mr. Wm Harper.)

Mr. Weir in opening the pleadings said that in this case Alex. McKeown was the plaintiff, and John Willis the defendant. In the statement claim the plaintiff complained that defendant on the 8th May assaulted and beat the plaintiff and struck him on the forehead with a large stone, whereby he suffered injury, and he also complained that the defendant violently struck him with a stick, whereby his right eye was burst and the plaintiff had lost the sight of the eye. The defendant denied that he assaulted the plaintiff and he said the plaintiff assaulted him first, and anything he did was in self defence. The defendant by way of counter claim stated that the plaintiff beat him; to that the plaintiff filed that he did not do it.

Mr. Andrews stated the case for the plaintiff and said that he anticipated that the jury, after hearing the evidence, would feel themselves warranted in awarding to his client substantial damages for the very savage assault which had been committed on him through the defendant’s violence. The plaintiff was the son of a respectable farmer, and he had been frequently employed as a carter, making good use of his time. The defendant was also a farmer, and both parties lived in the neighbourhood of the Whitemountain. It appeared that on the 8th of May last the plaintiff and defendant were in Belfast, and in the evening they were returning home, and when somewhere about Collin the parties came together and the defendant then used irritating language to him. He said something about a man named Armstrong being a better man than the plaintiff. Suddenly the defendant attacked the Plaintiff, and subsequently struck him with a stone on the forehead, and some persons who were with him actively assisted him, and if matters had ended here the probabilities were that nothing more would have been heard of this disgraceful thing; but shortly after this first assault the defendant assumed a tone of friendship towards the plaintiff and patted him on the back, and induced him to regard him as desirous to make up friends. He so induced the plaintiff to come up to the cat which the defendant had in charge. The plaintiff had observed the defendant go into the Colin Glen and bring out a stick, which he had disposed of by placing it in the cart. The plaintiff, not suspecting there was anything treacherous, went up to the defendant’s cart, and the very moment he went up Willis snatched the stick out of the cart and struck the plaintiff a violent blow with it on his eye, leaving it in such a condition that it had subsequently to be removed.

The jury might probably hear that both parties had to some extent drunk on the day in question. After this unwarrantable attack, the defendant knowing that the magistrates in the neighbourhood were not willing to grant cross summonses, went and took out summonses the next morning, so as to beforehand with the plaintiff; but the magistrates, when they heard that there were proceedings going to be instituted, very properly would not adjudicate on the matter.

The plaintiff, a man named Roe, Dr. McKeown, and others having been examined.

Mr. Porter addressing the jury for the defendant, said that his client was a most respectable farmer, and he would, when examined, tell them that he was perfectly sober, whilst the drunkenness was all on the other side. McKeown, after leaving Belfast, got into the cart of a man named McCourt, who was a farmer in the neighbourhood of the White Mountain. McCourt was drunk, and McKeown, who was also the worse of drink had taken the reins from McCourt, and was driving carelessly, as any man who was drunk in charge of a horse and cart would do.  Mr Willis, who was with his carts behind, on coming up went forward to McCourt’s cart. And on findings that McCourt was drunk, and that McKeown was the same, he said that he would take charge of the horse. The horse was a restive one, and from no object but the safety of McCourt and his horse he took charge of it, and if he had not done so the result might have been far different than the loss of the eye. The plaintiff was driving in a very reckless manner, and was wanting to make the horse pass every horse he met on the road. As soon as Willis took charge of the horse McKeown commenced to banter the defendant. Ultimately, Willis got out of the cart, and McKeown followed him, and after using threats of violence knocked Willis down, beat him, and used a stone which he had in his hand very freely. McKeown told Willis that he had it in for him, and wanted to fight, but the defendant said he would not. The plaintiff afterwards knocked down the defendant’s wife, and beat her, and she was injured. McKeown admitted that Willis’s wife had been so treated, but he was wholly unable to say who struck her. McKeown for about a mile and a half challenged and bantered Willis, trying to induce him to fight. When nearing Hannahstown police barracks McKeown desisted, but when the barracks had been passed he renewed the attack, and was worse than before. When coming up to Orr’s Public house he drew his fist and struck Willis, and drove him with the blow against the cart. Willis was in ill health at the time, and took a stick, which a man named McCourt had got him out of the glen, out of the cart and gave him a blow on the face, which had the effect of destroying the man’s eye; but, at the same time, it was a very trivial blow, but the eye was a delicate organ, and was easily injured. The stick was used without any intention to do any harm; but in this instance the aggressor was to blame for what he brought on himself.

The defendant and his wife and other witnesses were examined in support of counsel’s statement.

Mr. Monroe and Mr Weir having addressed the jury, His Lordship summed up.

The jury, after some consultation, found for the plaintiff with £160 damages.

Death Notice — Richard Wallace

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 8th October 1879 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Armstrong – September 26 of croup, at the White Mountain, Derriaghy, Richard Wallace, youngest son of John Armstrong, aged 6 years and 7 months.

Civil War – Muster Roll of the Orange Army

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 31st May 1886 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Preparations were being made for Civil War. The following appeared on The Muster Roll of the Orange Army.
Name known by: Third Brigade – 7th or Maze regiment of Infantry "Duke of Manchester." Rallying centre: 8. Whitemountain -Number enrolled: 60 active  34 reserve

Petty Sessions Cases

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 18th October 1889 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Lisburn Petty Sessions – This fortnightly court was held yesterday before Messrs. T.P. Stannus, J.P. (chairman): Theodore Richardson, J.P., N.W. Grimshaw, J.P., R.H. Bland, J.P., James Crossin, J.P., and Dr. Musgrave, J.P.

John Steel summoned three young men named Martin Lamont, and Morrow, for that they did unlawfully kick and knock the door of complainant’s dwelling house at Island Row, thereby wantonly disturbing the complainant. The case was adjourned.

Hugh Watson of Whitemountain summoned George White of the same place, for having unlawfully assaulted him at Aughnaslone on the 7th instant. The Bench dismissed the summons. …

Advertisement for Incumbrancers

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 30th January 1891 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

In the County of Antrim County Court
No 46 Division of Belfast – Equityside.
Hilary sittings 1891
Advertisement for incumbrancers.

Pursuant to a decree of his Honor the Recorder of Belfast, and County Court Judge, and Chairman of Antrim, made in a suit wherein Ernest Richardson is Plaintiff and John Richardson and another are Defendants.

All persons claiming to be incumbrancers of all that and those that Farm of Land situate in the Townland of Whitemountain, Parish of Derriaghy, Barony of Upper Massereene, and County of Antrim, containing 18 acres and 2 roods, or thereabouts, and held by the said Defendant, John Richardson, are, on or before the 18th day of February 1891, to send by post, prepaid, to the Registrar of the said Court, at the County Courthouse, Belfast. Their Christian and surnames, addresses and descriptions the full particulars of their claims, and the nature of the securities, held by them; or, in default thereof, they will be peremptorily excluded from the benefit of the said decree….

Notice to Creditors

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 22nd February 1893 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Legal Notices
Statutory notice to Creditors.

In the goods of William Morrow, late of Holywood, in the County of Down, Gentleman, deceased.

Notice is hereby given, pursuant to the Statute 22nd and 23rd Vic., c 35, that all persons claiming to be creditors of, or to have any Claims or Demands against or affecting the Estate of this Deceased, who died on or about the 15th day of January, 1893, are hereby required, on or before the 1st day of May next, to furnish full particulars of such Claims and Demands to the undersigned, the Solicitors for George McIldowie, of Belfast, in the County of Antrim, Solicitor; James Munce, of Holywood, aforesaid Civil Engineer; Robert morrow of Whitemountain, Stoneyford, in the said County of Antrim, farmer; and Andrew Osborough, of Swatragh, in the County of Londonderry, Constable Royal Irish Constabulary, the Executors appointed by the Will and Codicil thereto of said Deceased, to whom Probate of said Will and Codicil, issued forth of the District registry at Belfast of the Probate and Matrimonial Division of the High Court of Justice in Ireland on the 17th day of February inst.

And Notice is hereby further given, that immediately after the said 1st day of may next, the said Executors will proceed to distribute the said Estate, having regard only to such Claims and Demands of which they shall have had notice as aforesaid.

Dated this 17th day of February, 1893.
George McIldowie & Sons
Solicitors, 26 Corn Market, Belfast.

Theft of Watch

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 11th August 1894 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Alleged theft of a watch – On the 9th inst a man named McCormick, residing at Whitemountain, gave a silver watch to a neighbour named Connor, belonging to the same district, to bring into Lisburn to have it cleaned and repaired. On the way the man entered the public house of a man named Greenfield, and whilst there he as alleged lost the watch. He came into Lisburn and made an information before Mr. James Crossin, J.P., who issued a warrant for the arrest of a man named James Belshaw. Soon afterwards Belshaw was arrested and brought before Mr. Crossin who remanded him on bail until the petty sessions.

Road Contractors Summoned

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 13th May 1898 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Hillsborough Petty Sessions.

John H Brett, county surveyor, summoned Richard Braithwaite, of Whitemountain, road contractor, and Hugh Watson and John Carr, his sureties, for neglect and inattention in the performance of his contract. The magistrates dismissed the summons, but refused costs.

Stock, Hay and Cards for auction

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 28th July 1899 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Sales by Auction –
J D Martin & Co.’s
List of Auction sales

29th July at 5 o’clock – stock, hay and carts at Whitemountain for Mr. John Willis, senior.

Newspaper Clippings – Various

The following is from a newspaper cutting source unknown:

Watson – November 4, 1926 at his residence, Whitemountain, Stoneyford, Hugh, dearly loved husband of Mary Jane Watson. Funeral tomorrow (Saturday) at 2.30pm to Derriaghy Churchyard. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted.

McCourt – June 3, 1931 at his residence, Whitemountain, Stoneyford, David James, dearly beloved husband of Janeanna McCourt. Funeral on tomorrow (Saturday) at 3.30pm to Stoneyford Churchyard. Deeply regretted by his sorrowing wife and Family. American papers please copy.

PRONI Will Calendars

The following information is taken from the will calendars in the PRONI and are reproduced with kind permission of Deputy Keeper of the Records, Public Record Office of Northern Ireland.

Richard Willis

Date of Death 01 12 1873
Date of Grant 19 01 1874
Effects under £300
Registry: Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will (with one Codicil) of Richard Willis late of White Mountain County Antrim Farmer deceased who died 1 December 1873 at same place was proved at Belfast by the oaths of William Fleming and James Johnston both of Pan Park Aughnasloan (Lisburn) in said County Farmers two of the Executors.

Anthony Watson

Date of Death 02 01 1876
Date of Grant 03 03 1876
Effects under £450
Registry: Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of Anthony Watson late of Whitemountain County Antrim Farmer deceased who died 2 January 1876 at same place was proved at Belfast by the oath of John Watson of Enagh in said County Farmer the Executor.

Joseph Belshaw

Date of Death 14 03 1877
Date of Grant 09 04 1877
Effects under £200
Registry: Belfast

Full Abstract:

Letters of Administration of the personal estate of Joseph Belshaw late of Whitemountain County Antrim Farmer deceased who died 14 March 1877 at same place a Widower were granted at Belfast to Richard Belshaw of Whitemountain (Lisburn) same County Road Contractor a Child of said deceased.

William Willis

Date of Death 09 04 1878
Date of Grant 03 05 1878
Effects under £100
Registry: Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of William Willis late of Whitemountain County Antrim Farmer deceased who died 9 April 1878 at same place was proved at Belfast by the oaths of David Waring of Mullyglass (Dunmurry) John Alexander of Legmore (Dunmurry) and John Willis of Whitemountain (Stoneyford) all in said County Farmers the Executors.

Abraham Willis

Date of Death 13 06 1882
Date of Grant 09 08 1882
Effects £210
Registry: Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of Abraham Willis late of Legmore County Antrim Farmer deceased who died 13 June 1882 at same place was proved at Belfast by John Willis of Whitemountain in said County Farmer one of the Executors.

James Fenning

Date of Death 15 05 1884
Date of Grant 13 09 1889
Effects £65
Registry: Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of James Fenning late of Whitemountain County Down Antrim Farmer who died 15 May 1884 at same place was proved at Belfast by Richard Belshaw of Aughnahoe said County Farmer one of the Executors.

Isaac Campbell

Date of Death 27 01 1886
Date of Grant 16 05 1888
Effects £104
Registry: Belfast

Full Abstract:

Letters of Administration of the personal estate of Isaac Campbell late of Whitemountain County Antrim Farmer who died 27 January 1886 at same place were granted at Belfast to Eliza Campbell of Whitemountain the Widow.

David Armstrong

Date of Death 12 07 1892
Date of Grant 12 09 1892
Effects £367 10s
Registry: Belfast

Full Abstract:

Letters of Administration of the personal estate of David Armstrong late of Whitemountain near Stoneyford County Antrim Farmer who died 12 July 1892 at same place were granted at Belfast to Mary Jane Armstrong of Whitemountain the Widow.

Hans Armstrong

Date of Death 29 05 1894
Date of Grant 10 12 1894
Effects £89 3s 6d
Registry: Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of Hans Armstrong late of Whitemountain County Antrim Farmer who died 29 May 1894 at same place was proved at Belfast by the Reverend Hugh Hastings of Magheragall said County Presbyterian Minister one of the Executors.

John Burns

Date of Death 18 10 1897
Date of Grant 03 11 1897
Effects £92 12s 6d
Registry: Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of John Burns late of Whitemountain County Antrim Farmer who died 18 October 1897 granted at Belfast to William Maxwell of Antrim-road Lisburn Thread Factory Manager and Thomas Fenning of Whitemountain Farmer.

George McCourt

Date of Death 07 03 1897
Date of Grant 17 12 1897
Effects £135 2s 6d
Registry: Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of George M’Court late of Whitemountain County Antrim Farmer who died 7 March 1897 granted at Belfast to Joseph Abbott of Magheragall said County and David J. M’Court of Whitemountain Farmers.

James Crone

Date of Death 06 08 1898
Date of Grant 17 03 1899
Effects £60
Registry: Belfast

Full Abstract:

Administration of the estate of James Crone late of Whitemountain County Antrim Farmer who died 6 August 1898 granted at Belfast to Rebecca White of Whitemountain Married Woman the Sister.

John Willis

Date of Death 07 12 1906
Date of Grant 24 12 1906
Effects £353 15s
Registry: Belfast

Full Abstract:

Letters of Administration of the personal estate of John Willis late of Whitemountain County Antrim Farmer who died 7 December 1906 were granted at Belfast to Richard Willis Farmers.

James McKeown

Date of Death 16 07 1907
Date of Grant 19 08 1907
Effects £456 5s
Registry: Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of James M’Keown late of Whitemountain County Antrim Farmer who died 16 July 1907 granted at Belfast to Robert Morrow Farmer.

Anne Jane McDowell

Date of Death 15 12 1907
Date of Grant 13 01 1908
Effects £46 15s 0d
Registry: Belfast

Full Abstract:

Administration of the Estate of Anne Jane McDowell late of Whitemountain County Antrim Widow who died 15 December 1907 granted at Belfast to James McDowell Farmer.

James McKinstry

Date of Death 20 12 1907
Date of Grant 17 01 1908
Effects £423 15s 0d
Registry: Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of James McKinstry late of Whitemountain County Antrim Farmer who died 20 December 1907 at Knocknadona County Antrim granted at Belfast to Edmund McKinstry Farmer.

Joseph Campbell

Date of Death 10 09 1914
Date of Grant 16 10 1914
Effects £497 18s 9d
Registry: Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of Joseph Campbell late of White Mountain Lisburn County Antrim Farmer who died 10 September 1914 granted at Belfast to Francis Leckey and William Campbell Farmers

Whitemountain – Plovers, Poteen and Preachers

A story by "The Digger"

Dr. Benjamin Workman, born in 1794 at Ballymacash, Lisburn left the area in 1819 and emigrated to Canada where he embarked on a career path that eventually led to success.

He later recalled in his journal one of those childhood experiences that had made a lifelong impression on him whilst residing at Ballymacash. When he was about 6 years of age he accompanied his father, Joseph, to the summit of Whitemountain. "For the first time I discovered that the blue sky I had gazed upon with my infant eyes did not touch the earth at the horizon."

His father pointed out to him the local villages and towns and he counted out a total of 21 church steeples. Lambeg, Lisburn, Hillsborough, and Moira were some amongst some of the places pointed out to young Benjamin. Marengo in Italy was however not in their sights, but was very much the topic of conversation at that time.

He recalls his father mentioning the recent success by Napoleon Bonaparte at The Battle of Marengo, Italy and wondering how the allies were progressing as he fixed his eyes on the horizon viewed from the Whitemountain.

Read more of this story »»

Coroner’s Verdict re Joseph Crossey

The following extract is from a supplement to The Lisburn Standard, Friday, June 19th 1945.

Ballinderry Man’s death
Body discovered at the side of the road.
The Inquest Proceedings.

On Friday afternoon in Lisburn Dr. H. Baird held an inquest on Joseph Crossey (59) of Ballyscolly, Ballinderry who was found dead on the side of the road at derrykillultagh on Thursday of last week.

Head Constable J.B. Iago conducted the proceedings on behalf of the Crown, and Mr. Jefferson (messrs C & H Jefferson, Belfast) appeared for Mr. WWm. Belshaw, J.P., the deceased’s employer.

Henry Hill Crossey, son of the deceased, gave evidence of identification. He said he could not recall his father ever being attended by a doctor, but had heard him complain of a headache at times, which deceased said was caused by fumes from the lime kiln where he worked.

Thomas Fenning, foreman at the kiln head at Knocknadona, said that on Thursday deceased and three other men were not loking too well and he knew their condition was due to fumes coming from the kiln head, so he directed them to another job. After dinner the three other men said they were going home. Shortly after Crossey came to witness and he did not look too well. He sadi he was going home and left with his bicycle at about 2.15pm. When the wind blew from the south more fumes than usual came from the kiln head.

Frank Marsden said that about 2.30pm on Tuesday he found deceased lying on his bicycle at the side of the road. he believed he was dead.

Dr. J.G. Johnston, M.C., J.P., said there were no signs of violence or injury on the body. In his opinion death was due to heart failure caused by coronary embolism. If the fumes at the lime kiln had anything to do with Crossey’s death he thought it would have happened at the works and not some miles away.

The Coroner said that as there was a certain amount of doubt about the fumes he would return an open verdict.

Sympahy with the bereaved relatives was expressed by the coroner.

Joining in the expression, the Head Constable said Mr. Belshaw had an understanding that when workers became ill at the kiln head they were at liberty to go home without suffering any loss of wages.

Mr. Jefferson said deceased had been employed by Mr. Belshaw for over 20 years and was a most valuable worker.

Mr. Belshaw felt and would feel his loss very much.

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