Crosshill Townland, Killead

Freehold Registration

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated Tuesday 29th September, 1829 and is reproduced with permission of the Belfast News Letter.

County of Antrim

List of persons applying to Register their Freeholds at the next General Quarter Session of the Peace, to be held at Antrim, for the Division of Ballymena, pursuant to the Act of 10th George the Fourth, Cap.8, entered by the Clerk of the Peace.

No: 44

Name and Residence of Applicant: George Davison, Crosshill
Description of Freehold: Houses and lands, Crosshill
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

No: 45

Name and Residence of Applicant: John Martin, Crosshill
Description of Freehold: Houses and lands, Crosshill
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

No: 46

Name and Residence of Applicant: Robert Bryson, Crosshill
Description of Freehold: Houses and lands, Crosshill
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

No: 39

Name and Residence of Applicant: William Thompson, Ballynadrentagh
Description of Freehold: Houses and lands, Crosshill, Randox & Ballynadrentagh
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

Marriage Notice — Le Baron J Vander Noot de Moorsel and Catherine Heyland

The following is an extract from The Belfast Newsletter dated 19th February 1833 and is used with permission of The Belfast Newsletter.

Marriage

On the 7th inst at Brussels, Le Baron J. Vander Noot de Moorsel, to Catherine Elizabeth, youngest daughter of the late Colonel Heyland, of Glendaragh, Co. Antrim, and his Britannic Majesty’s Consul at Ostend.

Ordnance Survey Memoirs

The following are extracts from “Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland – Parishes of County Antrim XIII 1833, 1835,1838”. Thanks to The Institute of Irish Studies, The Queen’s University of Belfast for permission to use this extract.

Glendarragh House

Glendarragh, the residence of John Moore, Esquire, is beautifully situated in the townland of Crosshill, at the southern side of the parish and within half a mile of the village of Crumlin. The demesne and grounds, which contain about 150 acres, lie along the northern side of the Crumlin water, on the lofty bank of which the cottage is situated.

Glendarragh is quite in the cottage style, but 1 storey. In the exterior of the house there is nothing ornamented or striking, but the interior is admirably constructed. It contains a regular suite of apartments. The vestibule, hall, corridors and doors are of Gothic style, and the windows of the dining and sitting rooms beautifully stained, and command an extensive and agreeable view of the lake and intervening scenery. The offices are not extensive nor in very good repair. The garden also is out of order.

Glendarragh takes its name from the romantic glen which is included in its grounds. The Crumlin water here rushes through a narrow and rocky glen, the sides of which rise precipitously on each side to from 60 to 100 feet above the water and are densely clothed with natural and artificial timber. The stream rushes over several ledges of rock by a succession of waterfalls, which give great effect to the scenery of the place. Along the banks are numerous delightful walks which are much frequented by picnic parties from Belfast and the neighbouring districts. The grounds all round are skirted with planting and there are also many ornamental clumps throughout them.
Oak, fir, larch, beech, hazel are the most prevalent trees. The ornamental grounds are chiefly confined to the glen, the remainder being under cultivation. Glendarragh was built by the late Colonel Heyland about the year 1805. Mr. Moore is merely a tenant, which may account for the grounds not being kept in better order.

Arrowhead of flint.

One of which is in the possession of Thomas Copeland, townland of Crosshill, found in 1838.

Other seats.

Glen Oak, the residence of Robert Macauley Esquire, is pleasantly situated in the townland of Crosshill, at the southern side of the parish and almost contiguous to the hamlet of Milltown. The house is of modern construction and appearance. The Crumlin river flows by the grounds and along its banks are some ornamental grounds, shrubberies and walks. There is a trifling lawn containing some good timber, a small walled garden and suitable offices.

Ordnance Survey Memoirs – Ben Neagh

The following extract is from "Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland – Parishes of County Antrim X111 1833,1835,1838". Thanks to The Institute of Irish Studies, The Queen’s University of Belfast for permission to use this extract.

Parish of Killead
Other seats.

Ben Neagh, the residence of James Macaulay Esquire, is prettily situated on a gentle eminence in the same town land and about a third of a mile north of Crumlin. The house, which is tolerably spacious, is a modern and nice-looking residence seated in a handsome lawn, tastefully ornamented with young planting and evergreens. The garden and offices are of suitable extent. Ben Neagh was erected in 1810.

The 1888 "Book of Antrim – Directory" by George Henry Bassett lists Jonathan Peel at Ben Neagh.

Some of the Peel family graves are located in the graveyard at Glenavy Parish Church.

Jonathon Peel Headstone

Peel Headstone

Call for Tenders – roadworks and footpath repairs

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated July 8th 1875 and is reproduced with permission of the Belfast News Letter.

List of applications not contracted for at Sessions, to be tendered for at Summer Assizes 1875.

Tenders for the execution of the following works will be received at the Office of Secretary of the grand Jury, County Courthouse, Belfast, until four o’clock p.m., on Friday the 16th July.

Lower Massereene,

21 – to keep in repair for 2½ years, 1,440 perches of road and footpath from Belfast to Crumlin, between Mr. Rhode’s mill gate and the Crumlin new road, in the townland of Crosshill – cost not to exceed yearly £100.

Drunk at Crosshill

The following extract is from The Lisburn Standard Saturday 3rd December 1910.

Crumlin Petty Sessions.
Police cases

Constable Brown v Francis Higginson, drunk at Crosshill 5th November; 10s 6d and costs.

Death Notice – McComb

The following extract is from The Belfast Newsletter dated 20th July 1912. It is reproduced with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

McComb – July 19th at his residence 61 Cedar Avenue, Belfast, Samuel, the dearly loved husband of Lizzie McComb. His remains will be removed from 61 Cedar Avenue, for interment in Killead Meeting-house Green, tomorrow (Sunday), the 21st at 2.30pm.

McComb – July 19th at his residence 61 Cedar Avenue, Belfast, Samuel the dearly beloved son of Elizabeth McComb of Crosshill, Crumlin.

Death Notice – Molyneux

The following extract is from The Belfast Newsletter dated Thursday August 1st 1912. It is reproduced with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Molyneux – At her residence, Crosshill, Crumlin, July 31 1912, Fanny Molyneux. Her remains will be interred in Killead Meeting burial ground today (Thursday) August 1st at three o’clock.

Bomber Crash

The following is from The Ulster Star, dated 25th March 1961 and appears with permission of The Ulster Star.

Five Escape in Bomber Crash

Five R.A.F. men had narrow escapes when a four-engined Lincoln bomber crashed near the farm of Mr. J. Wilson at Crosshill, Crumlin, on Wednesday.
Four of the crew were shocked, but unhurt, and the fifth sustained slight facial injuries.

The plane was coming in to land at Aldergrove after a local flight. It lost height rapidly and as it skimmed along a few feet from the ground the tail struck a tree.

Thrown 70 yards

One engine was flung about 70 yards and pieces of torn metal were scattered over a wide area. The crew got clear through an escape hatch.

The aircraft did not catch fire although hundreds of gallons of high octane fuel soaked into the ground.

RAF fire engines raced to the scene and firemen covered the wreckage with white foam.

Glendaragh

The following can be found in the book "Buildings of County Antrim by C.E.B. Brett published in 1996." page 218, no 190. Includes a photograph by M. O’Connell.

Glendaragh, Crumlin. Situated at 10 Crumlin Road, Crumlin. Town land – Crosshill.

Glen Oak

The following can be found in the book "Buildings of County Antrim by C.E.B. Brett published in 1996." page 160, no 135. Includes a photograph by M. O’Connell.

Glen Oak, Crumlin. Situated at Milltown, Crumlin. Townland – Crosshill.

A glimpse into our ancient past at newly refurbished Museum

The urn found in a field in Glenavy in 1898

The urn found in a field in Glenavy in 1898 is now on display at the newly refurbished Ulster Musum, Belfast. US4909-

The newly refurbished Ulster Museum in Belfast has re-opened after a three year closure and I was one of almost 60,000 people who visited during the first ten days.

The £17m redevelopment has given a refreshing uplift to those who have an interest in our rich heritage.

The big attraction that seemed to be on every child’s lips was the "mummy". There was a constant stream of onlookers visiting the Ancient Egyptian Gallery. Some were re-acquainting themselves with the remains of Takabuti the mummy, others were seeing her for the first time and also the facial reconstruction on display close by.

Takabuti, who had been laid to rest approximately 2300 years ago in a cemetery in Western Thebes, had been donated to the museum by Thomas Greg of Ballymenoch House, Holywood in 1835.

Mummification was a process that was to prepare the deceased for the "after-life".

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Talnotry Avian Care Trust

T.A.C.T (Talnotry Avian Care Trust) is situated at 2 Crumlin Road, Crumlin and operates a voluntarily run Wildlife Centre. The Charity cares for and rehabilitates sick, injured and abandoned wild birds and mammals. The Trust’s primary aim is to return birds and mammals back to the wild where practicable. Visit their website at http://www.tactwildlifecentre.org.uk for more details.

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