Ballytweedy Townland, Killead

Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland

The following extract is from "Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland – Parishes of County Antrim XIII 1833, 1835, 1838". Thanks to The Institute of Irish Studies, The Queen’s University of Belfast for permission to use this extract.

Gentlemen’s seats

Ballytweedy House is the residence of Mr Thomas Millikin. It was formerly the residence of the proprietor, Henry William Shaw, Esquire.

Coins and Hatchet

Samuel Corner, Ballytweedy townland, has 2 silver coins of 2s 6d magnitude, of Spanish fashion on his farm. The small stone hatchet, in same townland see specimen.

Ordnance Survey Memoirs – Ballytweedy House

The following are extracts from “Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland – Parishes of County Antrim XIII 1833, 1835,1838”. Thanks to The Institute of Irish Studies, The Queen’s University of Belfast for permission to use this extract.

Ballytweedy House, for many years the residence of the respectable family of Shaw, is now uninhabited and in ruins. It is situated in the townland of Ballytweedy, at the east side of the parish and near the old road from Antrim to Belfast. It had been a plain, commodious family mansion.

Coroner’s Inquest — Kilpatrick

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated Tuesday 2nd April 1861 and is reproduced with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Coroner’s Inquest – Thursday last, an inquest was held by John Jellet, Esq., in the parish of Killead, on view of the body of a man named Kilpatrick. From the evidence it appeared that the deceased had been seen somewhat the worse for drink, but able to take care of himself, on the evening of the preceding Monday, about eight o’clock. On Tuesday morning he was found, apparently sleeping, in a cart, in the shed of Alexander Robb, of Ballytweedy. Robb was unable to awake him, and sent for the deceased’s brother, who refused to come. The deceased remained in the cart during the entire day; and, strange as it may appear, was allowed to remain there without assistance during the entire following night! On Wednesday morning he was found dead. The jury returned a verdict that death had resulted from drunkenness and exposure to cold; and they added a remark that proper care had not been taken of the deceased when first discovered. The coroner expatiated in severe terms upon the gross neglect and inhumanity of Robb and the deceased’s brother; and regretted that the law did not permit the jury to return a verdict of manslaughter against the partied – a finding to which they had felt very much disposed – Ballymena Observer.

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