Crew Townland, Glenavy

The Crew in 1659

The Census of Ireland 1659 lists the number of people at Crew as 6. The six were recorded as being Irish and not English.

Freehold Registrations, 1831

The following is an extract from The Belfast Newsletter dated 30th September 1831 and is used with permission of The Belfast Newsletter.

The following names are taken from a list of persons applying to register their Freeholds at a General Quarter Sessions of the Peace to be held in Belfast on the 24th October, 1831.

No. 143

Name and Residence of Applicant: Winny Dornan, Crew
Description of Freehold, with the names of Barony and Townland in which situated: House and land, Upper Massereene, town land of Crew
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

Ordnance Survey Memoirs

The following are extracts from "Ordnance Survey Memoirs of Ireland – Parishes of County Antrim VII 1832 – 1838". Thanks to The Institute of Irish Studies, The Queen’s University of Belfast for permission to use this extract.

Schools:

Private school, in a house built for the purpose by subscription in the town land of Crew, originally established more than 20 years; income from pupils 19 pounds; intellectual education: Manson’s Spelling and reading book, Gough’s Arithmetic, Murray’s Grammar, writing and book – keeping; moral education: visits from the Protestant clergy, Sunday School, Authorised Version of Scriptures daily, church catechisms; number of pupils: males, 9 under 10 years of age, 12 from 10 to 15, 21 total males; females, 8 under 10 years of age, 7 from 10 to 15, 15 total females; total number of pupils 36, 31 Protestants, 5 Roman Catholics; master John Neill, Protestant.

School Statistics.

Crew, master Francis M. Stevenson, Established Church; pay school, annual income 12 pounds; schoolhouse stone and lime, cost 25 pounds; number of pupils by the Protestant return: 21 Established Church, 3 Presbyterians, 11 Roman Catholics, 19 males, 16 females; by the Roman catholic return: 21 Established Church, 3 Presbyterians, 11 Roman Catholics, 19 males, 16 females; the Marquis of Hertford gave 5 pounds 13s 9d towards building the schoolhouse.

Hertford Estate Rejoicings

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 10th February 1859 and is used with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Rejoicings on the Hertford Estate.

When it became known on Tuesday last that the lady of W.T. Stannus, Esq., J.P., Lisburn, had given birth to a son and heir, the tenantry on the Hertford estate assembled in large numbers on yesterday evening to manifest their respect and gratitude towards the family, by kindling large bonfires on the range of hills extending from Aughrim towards Glenavy. Tar barrels blazed on Bannister’s Hill, Whitemountain, Aughrim, Crew Hill, Carnkilly, Sentry Hill and other places. Many hearty cheers were given, which broke the dull ear of night, and were echoed far and wide amid the Glens of Stoneyford, and the adjacent districts. Such demonstrations as these give a sure indication of the state of public opinion on the estate. The agent of the Hertford Estate is deservedly popular amongst all classes of the tenantry. They have always found him to be a gentleman in the highest sense of the term, willing at all times to investigate their claims in a fair, free and full manner. The best proof of this is that great improvements are taking place on the estate, and the sweet power of cultivation appears, when formerly there was nothing but a dismal swamp, or a barren heath. This is not the only time on which the tenantry of this great property manifested their respect and esteem for the agent. On the occasion of his marriage with a lady of high rank, they presented him with a valuable service of plate, and gave a dinner at which were present, not only the respectable and influential men of all parties on the estate, but also many gentlemen from the adjacent districts. Such demonstrations of regard indicate a sound state of things, and furnish a pleasing picture of the mutual confidence and good-will which prevail between the agent and tenantry of one of the largest properties in Ireland.

Extract from Griffith Valuation 1862 – Union of Lisburn (Part of)

County of Antrim — Barony of Massereene — Parish of Glenavy

Column 1 : Number and letters of Reference to map
Column 2 : Occupiers
Column 3 : Immediate Lessors
Column 4 : Description of Tenement
Column 5 : Area
Not included Rateable Annual Valuation of land and buildings and Total Annual Valuation of Rateable property
Townland: Crew
Ordnance Survey map number: 63 & 59
1 Issac McNeice Marquis of Hertford Land 19 02 13
2 same same Herd’s Ho. And Land 45 00 32
3 same same House, Offices, Land 19 00 33
4a Edward Reid same House, Offices, Land 26 01 19
4b John Sloane Edward Reid House
5 William Cardwell Marquis of Hertford House, Office, Land 19 00 32
6 David Sloane same House, Offices, Land 17 00 32
7 John McNeice same House, Offices, Land 18 01 22
8 same same same 15 03 34
9 same same same 29 00 18
10 John Clarke same House, Office, Land 19 01 13
11 Samuel Greene same Land 08 02 12
12a Nelson Reid same House, Offices, Land 28 01 29
12b Dispensary
Nelson Reid
(see exemptions) Half Annual rent
13 William F. Reid Marquis of Hertford House, Office, Land 17 03 33
14 James R. Eden same Land 13 00 35
15 George Thompson same House, Offices, Land 33 02 26
16 George Addis same House and Land 10 00 37
17 Joseph Neill same House, Offices, Land 09 00 17
18 same same same 09 01 17
18a Arthur Letson Joseph Neill House and garden 00 01 30
19a Joseph Stephenson Marquis of Hertford House, Offices, Land 16 02 14
19b William Higginson Joseph Stephenson House
19c Church Education Society’s School
And Lecture House
see exemptions
20 Thomas F. Eden Marquis of Hertford House, Office, Land 17 03 13
21 John Allen same House and Land 16 03 03
22 Francis Gibson same Land 09 02 07
23 John Emmerson same House and Land 02 01 39
24 Walter Stannus same Land 24 00 30
25 Hugh Gillen same House, Office, Land 04 00 39
26 same same same 18 01 12
27 Edward Lavery same House and Land 01 01 39
28a William J Lavery same House and Land 07 01 23
28b James Lavery same House and Land 00 00 15
29a same same same 01 01 30
29b same same same 03 03 09
30 Mary Smyth same Land 07 03 27
31 Henry McAuley same House and Land 06 00 17
32 Hugh McWilliams same House and Land 08 02 17
33 Hugh McCorry same House and Land 04 00 39
34 John McCorry same Land 06 01 18
35 Patrick Morrison same House, Office, Land 17 02 12
36 James Culbert same Land 05 03 28
37 same same same 01 03 39
38 William Moore same House and Land 10 00 36
39a William McCurry same House, Office, Land 04 03 09
39b Catherine McCurry William McCurry House
40 Carson McCurry Marquis of Hertford House and Land 01 01 00
41 Thomas McGarrold same Land 10 03 35
42 Sarah McCurry same House, Office, Land 06 01 18
43 James McWilliam same House and Land 07 01 28
44 William Higginson same House, Offices, Land 17 01 33
45 John McKavanagh same Land 05 03 28
 
Total of Rateable Property    609 03 21
Exemptions: Dispensary and Church Education Society’s School and Lecture house.   

Crew Hill

The following is an extract from "Glenavy: The Church of the Dwarf 1868 – 1968" by Rev. Patrick J. McKavanagh.

CREW HILL

With this background we can see how the Crew fits into our annals. The great store on which the inauguration of the Ulidian kings was performed still remains, though a little removed from its original position. About 1880 it had sunk so much that little of it was visible. A number of youths, both Catholic and Protestant, raised it and placed supporting stones underneath. Later on some youths from Stoneyford visited the spot and when they had gone it was found the supporting stones had been removed. This anecdote was told to Canon McEvoy by Mr. Francis McCorry in 1935. At the moment the stone, though clearly visible, lies very low.

The old name for this site was Craebh Tulcha which Dr. O’Donovan translated as The Spreading Tree of the Hill. There was probably some sacred tree nearby which figured in the ceremony. It is not true to say that the kings were "crowned" here, as crowning is a Germanic concept. The new chieftain probably placed his foot on the stone and took his oath while his followers gave the three traditional cheers. A few stone-lined graves belonging to the pagan period have been discovered on the summit of this hill, and not far away is a large rath which could have been the site of the royal residence.

The hostility of the enemies of the Ulidians was specially directed against this spot, hallowed by a thousand traditions. In 1003 the Kinel Owen who were now the dominant force in the North defeated the Ulidians and butchered their leaders. Their own king was slain and Brian Boru, who had already been accepted as sovereign of Ireland by most of the septs, came north to secure total submission. Though he did not manage this, the Ulidians acknowledged his sovereignty and he encamped on Crew Hill where he was in friendly territory. The strongest bond of union between Brian and them was their mutual hatred of the Kinel Owen and Kinel Connell, the Northern Hy Niall, the descendants of Niall of the Nine Hostages, a Heremonian. The event was not forgotten. After Brian’s death the Ulidians backed the claim of Murtough O’Brien, his great grandson, to the throne of Ireland in opposition to Donnell McLoughlin, king of the Kinel Owen. Donnell led his men across Tuaim (Toome) into Ulidia in 1099, routed the Ulidians at Crew Hill and burned their camp, cutting down the sacred tree. Ua hAmhrain (O’Hafferin) of the Ulidian cavalry was slain in this encounter. His family’s name is found in the townland Straidhavern.
Twelve years after this, the insult was repaid with a vengenance when the Ulidians marched to Tealach Og (Tullahoge) where the Kinel Owen were inaugurated and cut down its trees. The struggle went on, weakening both sides but two new events were under way which would change the face of Irish history. One was the Norse Invasion or the “Coming of the Danes,” and the other was the Norman Conquest. A land which had been ravaged by strife was a sitting target for an invader. Before we deal with the Norse Invasion let us now take a trip to Ram’s Island.

Death Extract – 1915 – Dorothy Jane Watson

The following death was registered on the 8th December 1915 by Dr. T. West. It recorded the death of 19 year old Dorothy Jane Watson on the 5th December 1915. She was a worker in the warehouse and she was found drowned in the Mill Dam at Glenconway Mill. The cause of death was recorded as "
suicidal drowning while in unsound state of mind." The information was received from Dr. A. Mussen, Coroner for County Antrim.

Dorothy Jane Watson was born on 2nd December 1896 (U/1898/144/1018/10/173). Her parents were Henry Watson and Isabella (nee Thompson). They were married at Ballinderry Parish Church on 15th May 1896 (M/1896/E1/1727/3/126 refers).

In the 1901 census the Watson family were recorded residing at Kilcreeny townland. At that time there were two children – Dorothy Jane and Thomas Henry (born 21 12 1898 – U/1898/144/1018/10/321 refers). The house they resided in was owned by Henry Ballance.

In the 1911 census the family were residing in the Crew townland. There were six children listed –

  1. Dorothy Jane
  2. Thomas Henry
  3. Sarah Elizabeth (born 14 10 1901 – U/1901/144/1018/11/29 refers)
  4. Samuel John (born 15 05 1904 – U/1904/144/1018/11/231 refers)
  5. William Edward (born 11 03 1907 – U1907/144/1018/11/426 refers)
  6. and Charles George (born 02 12 1909 – U/1909/144/1018/12/101 refers)

There is a birth of Margaret Eveline Watson recorded on 25 05 1914 (U1914/144/1018/12/354 refers).

In c1927 the Watson family relocated into a house built by Lisburn Rural District Council at Lisburn Road, Glenavy. There were 5 houses built at this time. The other four were occupied by Thomas Matier, Fred Morgan, William Harbinson and Archie McCord.

Blame it all on the fairies

The rath situated in the townland of Derrykillultagh near Glenavy

The rath situated in the townland of Derrykillultagh near Glenavy

THE older ordnance survey maps clearly label a round field sited in the townland of Crew, Glenavy as a fort.

To the bygone inhabitants who owned and worked the land there, the round field was known as the “forth field”. The ditch that encompassed it was referred to as the “march” in an old 1862 will of a former Crew inhabitant. This ensured that the executors were in no doubt as to which piece of the land was being referred to when the land was being divided out.

Read more…

"Diocese of Down & Connor Ancient and Modern"

Extract from Diocese of Down & Connor Ancient and Modern Volume 2 by Rev. J. O’Laverty P.P.M.R.I.A.
Published by M.H. Gill & Son, Dublin.

One of the townlands adjoining Templecormac is Derrykillultagh – "the oak-wood of Killultagh," which is by some supposed to give name to the Manor. The territory more likely received its name – "the wood of the Ultach, or Ulstermen," because it was in it their chiefs were inaugurated, on the hill of Crew. In more recent times the territory [1] did not extend to Crew; for it was supposed only to contain the civil parishes of Ballinderry, Aghalee, Aghagallon, Magheramesk, Magheragall, and the portion of Blaris which is the present county of Antrim; but it once extended probably to linits of the diocese of Down. St. Aengus calls the church of Dundesert in the parish of Killead Disert Ulidh.

Crew was named in ancient times Craebh-tilcha (pronounced nearly Crew-tallougha), which Dr. O’Donovan has translated in his edition of the Four Masters, the Spreading Tree of the Hill. It was so named from some sacred tree, under which, in ancient times, the kings of Ulidia were inaugurated. The great stone, on which the ceremony was performed, still remains, though it has been removed a little from its original position. On the summit of the hill a few stone-lined graves belonging to the Pagan period have been discovered; and at the distance of a few perches, there is a very large rath which was probably the site of the royal residence. This spot, hallowed by a thousand traditions handed down from the remote ages, was a place against which the hostility of the enemies of the Ulidians was specially directed; hence – A.D. 1003. "The battle of Craebh-tulcha between the Ulidans and the Kinel-Owen, in which the Ulidans were defeated. In this battle were slain Echoed (Eochay), son of Ardghair, king of Ulidia, and Dubhtuinne (Dufftinne), his brother; and the two sons of Eochaidh, i.e. Cuduiligh,[2] and Domhnall (Donnell;), Gairbhidhe (Garvey). Lord of Ui-Eathach (Iveagh); Gillapadraig, son of Tomaltach; Cumuscach (Kumiskey), son of Flathrai; Dubhshlangha, son of Aedh; Catha (Caha), son of Etroch; Conene, son of Muircheartach; and the most part of the Ulidians in like manner; and the battle extended as far as Dun-Eathach and Druimbo. Donnchadh Ua Loin sigh (Donoghy O’Linchey), lord of Dal-Araidhe, and royal heir of Ulidia, was slain on the following day by the Cinel-Eoghain (Kinel-Owen). Aedh (Ee), son of Domhnall Ua Neill, lord of Oileach, and heir apparent to the sovereignty of Ireland, fell in the heat of the conflict in the fifteenth year of his reign,[3] and the twentieth year of his age." Brian Boru, who had already been acknowledged as sovereign by most of the septs of Ireland, determined to take advantage of the weakness of the Kinel-Owen, now that their king had been slain, marched into the north to secure the submission of the tribes that had not yet tendered their allegiance. According to authorities cited by the Four Masters, Brian , on this expedition, which occurred, A.D. 1005, did not secure the submission of the Kinel-Owen nor of the Kinel-Connell, but the Ulidians acknowledged his sovereignty. He encamped on Crew Hill, and being in a friendly country, he dismissed his auxiliary troops to their various homes, and retained only his Munster forces. The following passage from The War of the Gaedhil (Gael – Irish) with the Gall (Danes) tells how Brian Boru and his Munstermen fared on Crew Hill.- "Brian was then at Craebh-Tulcha, and the Ulaidh (Ulidians) with him getting provisions there. They supplied him there with twelve hundred beeves; twelve hundred hogs, and twelve hundred wethers; and Brian bestowed twelve hundred horses upon them, beside gold, and silver, and clothing. For no purveyor of any of their towns departed from Brian without receiving a horse or some other gift that deserved his thanks." Their common hatred of the Kinel-Owen and Kinel-Connell was the strongest bond of union, that bound together Brian and the Ulidians. Ninety-four years afterwards the Kinel-Owen, led by Donnell O’Loughlin, or MacLoughlin, cut down the sacred tree. A.D. 1099, "An army led by Domhnall Ua Lochlainn and the ClannaNeill of the North across Tuaim (Toome), into Ulidia. The Ulidians were encamped before them at Craebh-Tulcha, on coming together the hosts press the battle on each other. Both the cavalries engage. The Ulidian cavalry was routed and Ua-h-Amhrain[4] (O’Harrerin), slain in the conflict. After this the Ulidians left the camp, and the Clanna-Neill burned it, and cut down (the tree called) Craebh Tulcha. After this two hostages were gven up ro them, and the successor of Comghall (the Abbot of Bangor) as security for two hostages more. Of this it was said:-

The hostages of Ulidia were brought by force,
As witnesses distinctly relate,
By Domhnall of the lion fury,
Chief of the generous race of Eoghan.
Two brave hostages were given
Of the heroes of Ulidia on the spot;
The third without reproach, the Abbot of Comhghall
To acknowledge Domhnall Ua Neill, as king.

The ninth year above ninety,
And a thousand years of fame,
From the birth of Christ, certain without decay
Was that, in which things were accomplished.
From the year in which cook-houses were few,
The third was that, in which,
With vigour, after difficulty unspeakable,
After cutting down Craebh-Tealcha, he brought them (the hostages).

This was one of the many battles fought against the Ulidans by the Kinel-Owen, to punish them for having, through their usual antipathy to the Hy-Niall race, lent their assistance to establish Murtough O’Brien, great-grandson of Brian Boru, on the throne of Ireland, in opposition to Donnel McLoughlin, King of the Kinel-Owen. Twelve years afterwards the Ulidans retaliated the insult offered to their national honour on Crew-hill; for the Four Masters inform us that, A.D. 1111. "An army was led by the Ulidians to Tealach-Og (Tullahoge), and they cut down its old trees." These were the old trees at which the kings of the Kinel-Owen were inaugurated. It appears from various passages in our Annals, that there were ancient trees at all the places, where the ancient Irish chieftains were inaugurated, thus we are told that the "Tree of Aenach-Maighe-Adhaire," which stood at Moyre, near Tullagh, in the County of Clare, and under which the O’Brien’s were inaugurated, "was cut, after being dug from the earth with its roots," in the year 981, by Maelseachlin, or Malachy, King of Ireland, one of the kings who belonged to the Southern Hy-Niall race. In the year 1148, Murtough MacLoughlin, King of the Kinel-Owen, dethroned Cuuladh O’Donlevy, King of Ulidia, and established another king in his place. As soon, however, as the Kinel-Owen, dethroned Cuuladh O’Donlevy, King of Ulidia, and established another king in his place. As soon, however, as the Kinel-Owen left, "An army was led by Tighearnan O’Rourke and Donough O’Carrol into Ulidia, as far as Craebh-Tealcha; and they plundered the country and placed Cuuladh (Cu-ula) in the kingdom again; however he was immediately expelled by the Ulidians themselves." This is the last time that Crew-Hill[5] appears in our stormy Annals, and its visitors though unwelcome, were not unknown to fame; Tiernan O’Rorke was the prince of Breffney, whose wife, the unfortunate Devorgilla, eloped with, or was carried off by Dermot MacMurrough; and O’Carrol was the King of Oriel, who endowed the famous Cistercian Abbey of Mellifont.

"A View from the State of Ireland", written dialogue-wise, between Endoxus and Irenaeus, by Edmund Spencer Esq. (the Poet), in the year 1596, "gives a very curious account of the election of Chiefs and Tanists:-

Eudox.– "What is this which you call Tanist and Tanistry?"

Iren.– "It is a custome amongst all the Irish, that presently after the death of any of their chiefe Lords or captaines, they doe presently assemble themselves to a place generally appointed and know unto them, to choose another in his steed, where they do nominate and elect, for the most part, not the eldest sonne, nor any of the children of the Lord deceased, but the next to him of blood, that is the eldest and worthiest, as commonly the next brother to join if he have any, or the next cousin, or do forth, as any is elder in that kindred or sept. And then next to him doe they choose the next of blood to be Tanist, who shall next succeed him in the said Captainry, if he live there unto.

Eudox.– "Do they (the Irish) not use any ceremony in this election? For all barbarous nations are commonly great observers of ceremonies and superstitious rites."

Iren.– "They use to place him that shal be their Captain upon a stone always reserved for that purpose, and placed commonly upon a hill; in some of which I have seen formed and ingraven a foot, which they say was the measure of their first Captain’s foot; whereon he standing, receives an oath to preserve all the ancient former customs of the country inviolable, and to deliver up the succession peaceably to his Tanist; and then with a wand, delivered unto him by some whose proper office that is; after which descending from the stone, he turneth himself round, thrice forward and thrice backward."

Eudox.– "And how is the Tanist chosen?"

Iren.– "They say he setteth but one foot upon the stone, and receiveth the like oath that the Captain did…The Tanist hath also a share of the country allocated unto him, and certain cuttings (cesses) and spending upon all the inhabitants under the Lord."

The Highlanders of Scotland inaugurated their Chiefs in the same way. Martin, in his Description of the Western Isles, observes that the ancient Kings of the Hebrides, and their successors, the Lords of the Isles, were inaugurated in Islay, "where there is a big stone of seven foot square, in which there was a deep impression made to receive the foot of MacDonald; for he was crowned King of the Isles standing on this stone; and swore that he would continue his vassals in the possession of their lands; and do exact justice to all his subjects; and then his father’s sword was put into his hands. The Bishop of Argyle, and seven priests, anointed him King in presence of all the heads of the tribes, who were his vassals; at which time the orator rehersed a catalogue of his ancestors." Sir Henry Sidney writes, March 1568, that a large band of Scots, intending, as was said, "to create a new Lord Clandeboy, not farre from Knockfergus, went under that pretence, to enter a wood near Castell Reagh." "On Leac na Riogh (the flag-stone of the Kings), in Tullaghogue," says Keating, "O’Neill was proclaimed; O’Kane and O’Hagan proclaimed him. O’Donnelly was the Marshal of his forces, and O’Breslan his Chief Brehon." According to the tradition in Tyrone, O’Hagan inaugurated the Chief of the Kinel Owen by putting on his golden sandal, hence the sandal always appears in the armorial bearings of the O’Hagans; and in 1607, according to a State Paper, Donnell Ballagh O’Kane "claimed, at the inauguration of O’Neill, to cast a shoe over O’Neill’s head." The stone on which the Kings of Scotland were inaugurated is now under the coronation chair in Westminister; and that on which the Kings of Ireland were inaugurated – the Lia Fail
Is on one of the mounds at Tara. O’Donnell was inaugurated at Kilmacrenan by O’Gallagher; and generally the chief of each district was inaugurated at the place, where was either the grave, or the residence of the original chief of the district. The blessing of the Church was always necessary, thus:- A.D. 994. "Muireagan of Both-Domhnaigh (Badoney), successor of Patrick (Primate), went upon his visitation in Tir-Eoghain (Tyrone) and he conferred the degree of King upon Aedh, son of Domhnall, in the presence of Patrick’s congregation." This was the King of Tyrone, who was slain in the battle of Crew. A.D. 1455. "The successor of St. Patrick (the Primate), Maguire, McMahon, O’Kane, and all the O’Neills, went with Henry, the son of Owen, who was son of Niall Oge, to Tullaghoge, to inaugurate him; and they called him O’Neill after the lawful manner."- Four Masters. "The clergy of the Church proceeded to implore the Almighty God on his behalf, and to sing praises and psalms in hymns in honour of Christ and of Columb (Kille) , for the prosperity of his government, as was customary." – M.S. Life of Red Hugh O’Donnell.

Footnotes

[1] A writer of a plan for the reformation of Ireland, A.D. 1515, recommends that the race of Hugh boy O’Neill – the Clannaboy – be expelled out of the lands from the Green castle to the Bann, "and be assigned and suffered to have their habitation and dwelling in the great forest Keyultagh, and the Pheux (Fews), which habitations and places they hath and dwelleth often before, now by compulsion." In 1586 Sir Henry Bagenall in his Description of Ulster says:- "Killutoe is a very fast countrey, full of wood and bogg; it bordered upon Loghe Eaghe and Clanbrasell; the there is one Cormock O’Neil (Cormac son of Niall O’Neill), who likewise was brought by Sir N.B. (Nicholas Bagenall), from the bondage of the O’Neils to yelde to the Quene. He is able to make 20 Horsmen and 100 kerne. This countrey (afore the Barons wars in England) maws possessed and enhabited by Englishe men, and there doth yet remayne an old defaced castle which still berethe the name of Sir Miles Tracie." When Hugh O’Neill, Earl of Tyrone, placed his grievances in 1594 before the Government he complains. "When the Earl (he himself) brought into submission (to the English) the Upper Clandhuboy’s, in the time of Con McNeile Oge, Kilultagh, Kilwarlyn, McCarten’s country, O’Hanlon’s country, and all McMahon’s country, such as appertained to the earl bearing rule in any of these places were removed, and base servile fellows of the Marshal’s (Bagenall’s) faction were placed in their rooms" Carew MSS. At this period Killultagh formed a portion of the county of Down. Bagenal describes the adjoining district of Kilwarin, also, as "a very fast woodland." On the corner of an old map published about 1592 there is the following note:- "Alonge this river (Lagan) be the space of 26 myles growth, much woodes, as well hokes (oaks) for tymber as hother woodde, which may be in the baie of Gragfergus with bote or drage." The very names of the townlands testify to the woody state of the country – Derrycloane (oak meadow); Ballinderry (town of the oak wood); Fee more (the great wood). &c., &c.

[2] Cuduiligh – "greedy dog" would be considered a strange name at present.<

[3] This is reckoned from the death of his father, A.D. 978. Ee, or Hugh O’Neill, was inaugurated A.D. 993 or 993; both dates are given.

[4] The town land of Straidhavern is named from this family.

[5] Adhne (Ayna), a distinguished Connaughtman, was chief poet of Ulster in the reign of Conor MacNessa, at Emania, near Armagh about the time of the Incarnation. This Adhna had a son, Neidhe, who, having acquired all his father could teach, went into Scotland to learn what might be known in that country. From Scotland he returned to Emania: when however, he arrived at the royal palace, he discovered that his father had died a few days previously; and he found the chief poet’s chair, which his father had filled, empty, and the arch-poet’s official gown was lying on the back of it; this official robe was ornamented with the feathers of beautiful birds. Young Neidhe (Neye) put on the gown; but shortly afterwards Ferceirtne, the presumptive successor to the vacant chair, walked in and found it occupied by a youthful stranger. Then commenced a long and learned contest in literature, poetry, philosophy, druidism, &c., which is known in Irish Literature as the Dialogue of the Two Sages. It is not, however, with the dialogue we are here concerned, but with a passage in the preface to it, which is replete with topographical information. "He (Neidhe) set out from Port Righe (in Scotland) over the sea, and landed at Rind Ross (point of the promontory, apparently Killroot Point); from this he set over Seimhne (Shevny, now Island Magee); and over Lathairne (Lahairne, now Larne); and over Magh Line (Moylinny); and over Collabra (Ollarra – the Six-Mile-Water); and over Tulach-Rusc (Tullyrusk); and over Ard Sleibhe (Ardleive- The High Mountain); and over Craibh telca (Crew Hill); and over Magh-Ercaithi (would be pronounced now Moy Erkey, perhaps some form of Magheramesk); and over the (river) Banna Upper, and over Glen Righi, and over the terror Tories of Hy-Brea sail (in Co. Armagh); and over Ard Sail each (old name of Armagh), that is Ardmacha, and over the hill of the palace of Emhain (Emania, or the Navan Ring).” This curious journey tells us where the residences of the great chieftains who entertained wandering minstrels, and the directions of the great roads, which led through the country, in those early times."

Lisburn Board of Guardians – Removal of Crew Dispensary to Glenavy

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated 31 August 1881 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Lisburn board of Guardians – The usual weekly meeting of the Guardians of the Lisburn Union was held in the Boardroom of the workhouse yesterday – major H S McClintock, J.P., chairman presiding. The other guardians present were – Dr Mackenzie; Messrs Morrow, John Green, John Bradbury, James Megarry, William M Smyth, Bennett Megarry, Samuel Phenix, and Thomas Spence…..

Some time ago Mr Hamilton, Local Government Board Inspector, visited the dispensary of the Glenavy District, which is situate convenient to Crew Hill, and from a report which he made a meeting of the committee was called, when by a majority it was decided that the dispensary should be removed from that place to the town of Glenavy. The committee’s suggestion was forwarded to the Guardians for their approval, and on last board day, after a long discussion, it was adopted. Yesterday a letter was received from the local Government Board, in which they pointed out that arrangements should be made for the dispensary in Glenavy, and that removal should take place at once. Mr. Green the guardian for Ballinderry, was of opinion that if the Local Government Board were fully aware of the facts they would not approve of the proposed change; if a change was to be made from crew it should be to Ballinderry. The suggestion of Mr. Hamilton could be noted upon to have a depot or a medicine chest at Glenavy, for his own convenience. The Chairman said it was much more a question for the dispensary committee than for the guardians, and he would suggest that the committee should have that letter of the Local Government Board laid before them and reconsider the matter and send in a report. He would take the liberty of proposing that , if anyone would second it. Mr Spence seconded the chairman’s motion, which was passed unanimously. This was all the business of any importance, and the Board adjourned.

Meadow for sale – 1885

The following extract is from The Lisburn Standard – Saturday August 8th 1885

Meadow for sale.

To be sold by Public Auction at the hour of Two o’clock, at the Crewe, Glenavy.

About 20 acres meadow, the property of I. McKinstry McNeice, Esq.; in lots to suit Purchasers. Also, Half-an-acre, Orchard, prime Fruit.

Terms- 9 Months’ Credit on Approved Bills, 5 per cent allowed for cash.

W. J. Bailey, Auctioneer, Lisburn. August 5, 1885.

Farm of Land – 1886

The following extract is from The Lisburn Standard – Saturday December 25, 1886

Farm of Land

At Crewe, Glenavy, for sale, under Power of Mortgage Deed.

To be sold by Public Auction, without Reserve, on Tuesday, 18th January, 1887, at Twelve o’clock noon, in the Auction Mart, Bow Street, Lisburn.

That farm of land, now in possession of the Mortgagee, situated in the Townland of Crewe, lately in possession of Nelson Reid; containing 18a 3r 29p., held under Sir Richard Wallace, Bart., at the small yearly rent of £9 7s. The lands are situated about 1½ Mile from Ballinderry Station, and about same distance form Glenavy Station, on the march with Lake View Farm, having Dwelling-houses and Office-houses, the greater part of which are slated.

The land has been Thorough Drained, and, for its size, the Farm is one of the best in the neighbourhood. Private offers received for above previous today of sale.

Part of the purchase money may remain at Interest on the lands, if so required.

£20 Deposit at time of Sale, and Auction Fees.

Wm. J. Bailey, Auctioneer,.
Nov. 26, 1886.

Addis Estate

The following is from The Lisburn Standard – Saturday, January 12th 1889.

Notice to Creditors

George Addis, late of crew, Glenavy, in the
County of Antrim, Farmer, Deceased.

All persons having any claims
Against the Estate of the above deceased
Are hereby required to furnish (in writing) the
Particulars of such claims on or before 19th
January, 1889, to Mr. Joseph Neill, Crew,
Glenavy, executor, to whom Probate was, on
The 7th January last, granted forth of
The Belfast District Registry of the Probate
And matrimonial Division of the High Court
Of Justice in Ireland.

Samuel Walker, solicitor
For above Executor, 83. Lower
Gardiner Street, Dublin.

Land Sale

The following extract is from The Lisburn Standard dated 7th December 1889

Valuable farm of land for sale
At Crewe, Glenavy
To be sold by public auction (under power of
Sale obtained in Mortgage), in the Auction
Mart, Bow Street, Lisburn on the 24th December
1889, at the hour of One o’clock.
All that farm of land and premises
Situate in the Townland of Crewe, parish
Of Glenavy, and County of Antrim, in possession of
Mr. Henry Smyth, containing 18a 3r 29p.,
Statute measure, or thereabouts, and held under
Sir Richard Wallace, Bart., as a Judicial Tenancy,
at the yearly rent of £9 7s 0d. The farm is about
2 miles from Glenavy, and 8 miles from Lisburn.
A large portion of the Farm is under grass, the
whole being well watered and fenced, and in a high
state of cultivation.
On the farm there is a good dwelling-house and
Substantial office-houses all slated.
Part of the purchase money may remain on the
Security of the premises, if so required.
Deposit – £30 at time of sale; with 2½ per cent
Auction fees.
For further particulars as to title and conditions
Of sale, apply to
Samuel F. McConnell, Solicitor
Lisburn; or to
Wm J Bailey, Auctioneer, Lisburn

Farm for Sale

The following extract is from The Lisburn Standard Saturday February 8th 1890

Sales by Auction

Valuable
Farm of land
For sale in Crew

I have received instructions from Mr. Thos. Francis Thompson to sell by public auction on the premises on Saturday, the 1st March 1899 at the hour of twelve o’clock noon, All that farm of land in the town land of Crew, and county of Antrim, containing 32 acres statute measure or thereabouts, held under Sir Richard Wallace Bart. at the yearly judicial rent of £18 ?s 3d.

The farm is in good condition, and is situate within a mile of Glenavy, 3 miles from Crumlin and 7 miles of Lisburn. Immediate possession can be given the purchaser. For particulars and conditions of Sale &c. apply to
R H Berryhill, Solicitor having carriage of sale, Lisburn, W.J. Bailey, Auctioneer, Lisburn.

Sale Adjourned

The following extract is from the Lisburn Standard Saturday 15th March 1890

Adjournment of sale until further notice – farm of land belonging to Mr Henry Smyth, of Crew, Glenavy.

Estate of William John Gillen

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Standard – Saturday, December 6th 1890

Take notice that William John Gillen. Late of Lurganteniel, Ballinderry, in the County of Antrim, Farmer, who died on the 2nd July, 1890 by his will dated 29th of April 1890, gave the following charitable Bequest – To the Parish Priest of St. Joseph’s, Glenavy, the sun of £10 sterling, to be devoted to help defraying debt on Catholic Church, Glenavy. And Testator appointed as his executors Rev. George Pye, P.P., of Glenavy; Hugh Gillen, of Crewe, and James Horner, of Lurganteniel aforesaid, surviving executors, on the 29th day of October, 1890, forth of the District Registry at Belfast of the Probate and Matrimonial Division of the High Court of Justice in Ireland.

Dated this 24th day of November 1890.

G.B. Wilkins, Solicitor for said executors, Market Square, Lisburn; and 4 Upper Ormonde Quay, Dublin.
To the commissioners of Charitable Donations and Bequests, and all whom it may concern.

The Lisburn Standard reported on 13 12 1890 – biddings on the property that belonged to William John Gillen. Mr George Fleeton £70 & £105
Mr Denis Gillen £100, £110, £160 & £170 (purchaser)
Mr William Fleeton £159 & £165.

The Crew Stone

The following is an extract from "Glenavy Past and Present" by Charles Watson in 1892.

THE CREW.

CREW was named in ancient times Craebh-tulcha, which means "the spreading tree of the hill." It was so called from a sacred tree, under which the Kings of Ulidia were crowned. The great stone on which the ceremony was performed is still there, though not in its original position. At a few perches distant was a rath, which was probably the site of the royal residence. What a hallowed spot Crew Hill is from its ancient memories. Whoever now-a-days thinks that this is a spot which continually sounded to the tramp of armed men, and that here many a fierce battle was fought, for the enemies of the Ulidians always directed their hostility against the Crew. One battle in 1003 was specially memorable, when the Kinel-Owen utterly routed the Ulidians, the fight continuing as far as Drumbo in County Down. Ardghair was King of Ulidia, and his two sons were slain, as was also Aedh O’Neill, heir apparent to the sovereignity of Ireland, who was only 20 years of age. Brian Boru, at that time acknowledged by most of the Septs as Sovereign, came to the North in 1005, and, accepted by the Ulidians, but not by the Kinel-Owen, he encamped on Crew Hill. This is the description, given by The War of Me Gaedhil, of the reception accorded Brian and his Munster men on Crew Hill : "Brian was then at Craebh-Tulcha, and the Ulidians with him, getting provisions there. They supplied him there with 1,200 beeves, 1,200 hogs, and 1,200 wethers ; and Brian bestowed 1,200 horses upon them, besides gold and silver and clothing."

In 1099 the Kinel-Owen, led by Donnell O’Loughlin, cut down the sacred tree. We read, in 1099, "an army was led by Domhnall Ua Lochlain and the Clan Neill across Toome into Ulidia. The Ulidians were encamped at Craeb-Tulcha (Crew Hill)." Both the cavalries engage. The Ulidian cavalry was routed and O’Hafferin slain in the conflict. After this the Ulidians left the camp, and the Clanna Neill burned it and cut down (the tree called) Craebh Tulcha. Twelve years after, in 1111, the Ulidians retaliated and avenged the insult offered to their honour on Crew Hill by defeating the Kinel-Owen at Tullahoge (in Co. Tyrone, above Dungannon), and cut down their secred trees. Once again, in 1148, Murtough MacLoughlin, King of the Kinel-Owen, dethroned Cunladh O’Donolevy, King of Ulidia, but as soon as the Kinel-Owen left, Cunladh was restored, though soon expelled by the Ulidians themselves. This is the last mention made of Crew in the known histories of the country. But a curious entry in the diary of a wandering ministrel proves Crew and Tullyrusk were residences of great chiefs who always kept bards. It runs thus :-

"Neidhe landed from Scotland at Rind Roiss (Kilroot) and from this went over ….. Tulach Rusc, and Craibh Telcha …… to Emhain," or the Navan Ring Fort in Armagh.

Crew Stone

Crew Stone, Glenavy, where ancient Ulster Kings were crowned.

An old postcard depicting the Crew Stone

An old postcard depicting the Crew Stone (date unknown)

A man standing near the Crew Stone.

A man standing near the Crew Stone. Date unknown.

Crew 1891

From The Lisburn Standard – Saturday 4th April, 1891

CREW BIBLE CLASS

A social meeting in connection with the Crew Bible Class and Choir was recently held in the Crew School room. A large number of the members and friends were present. After tea Mr Henry Ballance of Eden Lodge was called upon to take the chair when a very large and interesting programme was gone through, consisting of readings, songs and recitations. The following took part in the programme – Me John McKnight, Miss E.J. Thompson, Mr James Hendren, Mr Robert Lennon, Miss McKnight, Miss Sarah E McKnight, Mr William J Fleeton, Mr A Stewart, Mr Matthew McKnight, and Mr Ralph Fleeton. Sweets and oranges were served round at intervals. A vote of thanks to the tea makers and those who had kindly assisted in adding to the enjoyment of the evening was proposed by Mr James Hendren and seconded by Mr Joseph L McKnight. The chairman in replying referred to the hearty response which the young ladies had given to the respective invitations. A most enjoyable and profitable evening was brought to an close by the singing of the National Anthem.

Swine Fever

The following is an extract from the Lisburn Standard Saturday 16th June 1894.

Lisburn Board of Guardians
Swine-fever

The Assistant – Clerk read the report of Mr. James Gregg, V.S. which stated that the veterinary department say that swine fever exists at Harriet Geddis’s, Pitmave; Mark Bell’s Legateriff; Sam McBrides, Ballymacbrennan; Goe. Fleeton’s, Crewe; Mary J English’s, Bridge Street, Lisburn; John E. Dickson’s, Ballyscolly; Josiah Archer’s, Toughblane; and it does not exist at Robert Connelly’s and Thomas Walsh’s.

Accident at Crewe Hill

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter Thursday 9th April 1896 and is used with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Accident near Glenavy – On the 7th inst on the holding of Mr. Francis Reid, at Crewe Hill, near Glenavy, a 2 year old bull broke loose. After considerable trouble, they got the animal into a corner, but it suddenly darted forward, knocking down Mr. Reid, and breaking two of his ribs. Dr. Carson, of Crumlin, was sent for and he did everything that medical skill could suggest. Under his treatment Mr. Reid is progressing favourably.

Coroner’s Verdict re John Stewart

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Herald, September 30th 1905

Sad Death near Glenavy

On Tuesday last Dr Adams, J.P., coroner, Antrim, held an inquest at Crewe on the body of John Stewart, farmer , who died on 25th inst, under circumstances of a melancholy nature. It would appear that the deceased rose out of bed at five o’clock a.m., on the 21st inst., took his breakfast as usual and went out to his work. Having assisted his sister to feed the pigs he was seen to go round the house in the direction of the potato field. A short time afterwards, George Stewart, coming from the opposite direction, heard screams and inquired what was wrong. Joseph asked where John was and, failing to see him, went in search of him, and found him lying at the head of the potato field, on his left side, with his head leaning against the ditch. His beard was covered with blood which was flowing from a wound five inches long on his throat. Dr. Mussen was sent for, and after having the unfortunate man removed to the house, washed and dressed the wound. Deceased was unconscious and remained in that condition until he died on 25th inst. Mr John O’Neill was foreman of the jury. Joseph Stewart deposed that nothing unusual had been remarked about his brother (deceased), excepting that about ten days previously he was duller and not speaking much to members of the family. Dr. Mussen was examined, and deposed that the cut was not the cause of death, as it was almost healed, but during his daily attendance on the deceased he (the doctor) found him suffering from a clot of blood on the brain. The jury returned a verdict to the effect that death was due to an effusion of blood on the brain, caused by the bursting of a blood vessel. Sergeant Rea, Crumlin, represented the Crown at the inquiry. Deceased was a much respected man, and his sad death is greatly regretted in the district.

Street Directories

In the 1907 Belfast Street Directory the following are listed in the Crew Townland.

Inhabitants

Joseph Armstrong
Henry Ballance, farmer
Joseph Reid, farmer
Francis Stewart, farmer

In the 1910 Belfast Street Directory the following are listed in the Crew Townland.

Inhabitants

Henry Ballance, farmer
David Black, labourer
James Elwood, farmer
John Higginson, farmer
Letitia Moore, farmer
Richard Moore, Carpenter
Thomas McGrath, labourer
Joseph Neill, farmer
Joseph Reid, farmer
William Smyth, farmer and cattle dealer
George Stewart, farmer

In the 1915 Belfast Street Directory, the following is listed as a "Guardian" within the Lisburn District:

Henry Ballance, Crewe – for Glenavy

Unionist Membership Card

Old Unionist Membership Card

Old Unionist Membership Card

Old Unionist Membership Card

Old Unionist Membership Card

This is an old Unionist membership card from Glenavy. It was in the possession of a family who once resided at the Crew.

It reads:

"Union is strength"
Ulster Unionist Council
Antrim Division
Glenavy Branch.

OBJECTS:

  1. To help the Unionist Cause by all legitimate means in our power.
  2. To read and circulate leaflets, etc., explaining our circumstances and needs, and to inform ourselves regarding the aims, achievements and ideals of the Unionist Party.
  3. To render all possible assistance in securing the perfect register of voters, by obtaining and reporting information respecting removals, new occupiers and owners.
  4. To contribute as far as we are able to Unionist Funds.

President:   Mr John Lyle
Chairman:   Mr A.A. Peel
Hon Secretary:   Miss E.Adeline McKeown
Hon Secretary:   Miss Sefton

District Brotherhoods – Orange Institution – L.O.L. 124

An extract taken from "A History of Orangeism in the Glenavy District – A Tercentenary Booklet 1690 – 1990" has been reproduced with the kind permission of the officers and Brethren in Glenavy District.   Read more …

The Crew Hill

The following is an extract from "THE GRAND BAZAAR and FANCY FAIR IN THE NEW SCHOOLS, CRUMLIN, 1914"

THE CREW HILL.
Its Historical Importance.

The subsequent history of Glenavy is closely connected with that of the Kingdom of Uladh or Ulidia. The Kings of Uladh were proclaimed on the Crew Hill, on the eastern side of the parish. The coronation-stone is still to be seen on the summit of the hill, but the “spreading tree,” under which the ceremony took place, and from which the place itself is named, vas cut down in 1099 by the Kinel-Owen, the hereditary enemies of the Ulidians. There is a large rath, which may have been the royal residence, on the south side, as you approach the top of the hill. On the summit there have been discovered some stone-lined graves belonging to the Pagan period. Nothing more remains to mark the scene where many a time the clansmen of Uladh gathered round their king from far and wide, to be drilled and marshalled for many a fierce encounter.

Then and Now.

The hill itself rises to a height of 629 feet, and commands a view of the entire parish. From the top of the Crew the scene that lies before the visitor on a summer’s day is one not easily to be forgotten. On the west, Lough Neagh stretches away in the distance to where Sliav Gallion and the grey-blue hills of Derry and Tyrone are dimly visible. Ram’s Island, with its clump of trees reflected in the water, seems to float upon the placid surface of the lake ; while here and there a flying sail betrays the Lough Neagh fishermen. In the centre of a picturesque landscape, that lies between us and the shore of the lough, we notice Chapel Hill-an eminence crowned by the Parish Church and Parochial House. The sheltered homesteads of the farmers seem to be within easy reach of one another ; while at some little distance towards the north we see the village of Glenavy half-hidden amongst the trees. We turn towards the south, and the rich plains of Down are stretching out before us. Here and there are towns and villages nestling amongst the woods and by the streams. In the distance far south our view is bounded by the Mourne Mountains, that keep eternal sentinel along the Irish Sea. On the north, the fertile tract of country lying around Crumlin, Antrim, and Templepatrick meets our view, and on a clear day the hills of Mid-Antrim are outlined upon the horizon. The eastern side of the hill presents a contrast to the other three. Here one sees the bleak mountainous district of the Rock ;and Stoneyford, threaded by the lonely roads that lead from Glenavy to the busy city of Belfast. Truly, it was a site well-chosen-this ancient stronghold of the Kings of Uladh. The traveller to-day, as he gazes on the quiet country-side, with its fields of golden corn and verdant pasture-lands forgets that these fair plains were many a time and oft the scene of furious battles.

THE KINGDOM OF ULADH.
The Fall of Emania.

The Crew Hill came into prominence in Irish history after the destruction of Emania, in 335 A.D. Up to that time Emania was the centre of royal power for the whole Province of Ulster. Its King, according to the Book of Rights, had the privilege of sitting by the side of the King of Erin, and held first place in his confidence. The Palace of Emania yielded in fame and magnificence only to the Palace of the High-King at Tara. At the dawn of history it had a storied past. It had been founded by Queen Macha of the Golden Hair three centuries before the Christian era. It reached its highest glory in the time of Conor Mac Nessa and his Red Branch Knights.

For six centuries, therefore, the King of Emania was Sovereign of all Ulster and sometimes also High-King of Leland. But in the century before St. Patrick evil days came upon it. The three Collas made war upon the Ulster King, plundered his territory, and burned the palace, around which centred the romantic tales of the Red Branch Knights. The Ulidians were driven eastwards over Glenree, or the Newry River. They took their name with them into their circumscribed territory. From this time onward the term Ulidia, or Uladh, is applied to the tract of country lying to the east of Lough Neagh and the Newry River. Sometimes the Plain of Muirtheimhne, or North Louth, was included ; but indeed the boundaries of territories in those days were continually fluctuating, according to the power of each new sovereign to annex the territory of his neighbours.

The King of Uladh, then, who was crowned and proclaimed on the Crew Hill, had subject to him the Kings of Dalaradia, of Dalriada, of Dalmunia, of Dufferin, of the Ards, of Lecale, of Iveagh, and of several minor provinces.

Circumscribed Uladh.

It would take too long to follow the fortunes of the Kingdom of Uladh through all its chequered history. The law of succession was a fruitful source of strife at home. According to the Irish custom, the heir to the throne was not the eldest son, but the member of the royal family, or royal blood, who was adjudged most worthy. This gave a constant pretext to rival claimants. And the enemy abroad was ever on the watch. The Kinel-Owen were ready at all times to take advantage of Uladh’s difficulty or temporary weakness. Hence, as years went on, the King of Uladh, who had at first aspired to regain his lost sovereignty over Ulster, found himself at length unable to hold his power over his tributary kings and princes.

Battle of the Crew Hill.

One or two events cannot be passed over. The first is the Battle of the Crew Hill, in 1003 A.D., in which the Ulidians were defeated by their old enemies, the Kinel-Owen. From the account of the Four Masters, we see what enormous forces were engaged : ” In this battle were slain Eochy, son of Ardghair, King of Uladh, and Duftinne, his brother; the two sons of Eochy, Cuduiligh and Donal ; Garvey, lord of Iveagh ; Gillapadruig, son of Tumelty ; Kumiskey, son of Flahrey Dowling, son of Aedh ; Calhal, son of Etroch ; Conene, son of Murtagh ; and the most part of the Ulidians in like manner ; and the battle extended as far as Duneight and Druimbo. Donogh O’Linchey, lord of Dal-Araidhe and royal
heir of Uladh, was slain on the following day by the Kinel-Owen. Aedh, son of Donal O’Neill, lord of Aileach and heir-apparent to the sovereignty of Ireland, fell in the heat of the conflict, in the fifteenth year of his reign and the twentieth year of his age.”

Brian Boru at the Crew Hill.

Two years later another important event occurred–the visit of Brian Boru to the Crew Hill. It was nine years before the Battle of Clontarf. Malachy, of the Southern Hy-Niall, had been deposed from the High-Kingship, and Brian acknowledged in his place by almost the whole of Ireland. The Kinel-Owen and the Kinel-Conall still sympathised with Malachy and his adherents. The King of the Kinel-Owen had fallen in the Battle of Crew Hill, and Brian thought the time opportune to march northward and secure the submission of the Ulster chieftains. The expedition arrived at the Crew Hill in 1005 A.D., and the Ulidians tendered their allegiance. The Wars of the Gael with the Gall describes the provisions supplied to the army of Brian while he was encamped there : “They supplied him there with twelve hundred beeves, twelve hundred hogs, and twelve hundred wethers ; and Brian bestowed twelve hundred horses upon them, besides gold and silver and clothing. For no purveyor of any of their towns departed from Brian without receiving a horse or some other gift.” But although Brian was well received by the Ulidians, he had to depart from Ulster again without receiving the submission of the Kinel-Owen or Kinel-Conall.

THE DECLINE OF ULADH.
Defeat.

Another century passed by, and the fortunes of the Kingdom of Uladh were on the wane. Against the Crew Hill the enemies of the Ulidians seemed relentless in their attacks. In 1099 Donal O’L.ochlainn led an army of the Northern Hy-Niall across Toome into Ulidia. He reached the Crew Hill and found the Ulidian forces ready for battle. In the engagement that followed the Kinel-Owen were victorious. The victory gave them an opportunity of inflicting a lasting humiliation on their old enemies. They cut down the Sacred Tree of the Crew Hill, and compelled the Ulidians to give hostages.

Retaliation.

Twelve years later the Ulidians had recovered so far as to be able to retaliate for the insult offered to their national honour. In 1111 A. D. they led an army into the territories of the Hy-Niall, and cut down the sacred trees of Tullaghogue, under which from time immemorial the Kings of the Kinel-Owen were inaugurated.

O’Rorke and O’Carroll at the Crew.

The Kinel-Owen had their revenge. They came in 1148 under Murtagh Mac Loughlin and dethroned Cuuladh O’Donlevy King of Uladh, and set up Donacha, a prince of the same family, in his place. Tighernan O’Rorke and Donogh O’Carroll came with an army to the assistance of the ill-fated monarch. They established him again on his throne ; but no sooner were they gone than Cu-uladh was expelled by the Ulidians themselves, It was this same Tighernan O’Rorke, Prince of Breffney, who four years later was doing the penitential exercises on Lough Derg, when his wife Devorgilla eloped with the infamous Dermot Mac Murrough. It may be remarked in passing that Devorgilla soon afterwards retired to the Abbey of Mellifont, where she spent the rest of her days in works of penance and charity. O’Carroll, who accompanied O’Rorke to Craobh-Tulcha, was the King of Oriel that endowed the famous Cistercian Abbey of Mellifont.

Fuit llium.

After this we hear no more of the Crew Hill in Irish history. Its fame and munificence and hospitality had been the theme of minstrels in the days of King Connor Mac Nessa. With the falling fortunes of its chiefs Craobh Tulcha lapsed into oblivion. Its very site was almost forgotten. So much so that an otherwise accurate and painstaking antiquarian of the last century wrote : ” It would appear that the place lay towards the north of the modern county of Down, somewhere in Castlereagh.”

A Poet of the Fourteenth Century.

Here are a few lines translated from a topographical poem written in praise of the chieftans of Uladh by John
Mor O’Dugan, who died in 1372 A.D.

” Let us lift our heads towards Creeve-Roe.

The chief Kings of Uladh let us name,
The lands of hospitality and spears,
The Dunlevys and the Hoeys.
” Of their nobles are men of slaughters,

The O’Haddys: and the Keogans.
Great are the spoils they bring from plunder,

The O’Laverys and O’Lawlors.
The O’Lynches have proud champions,

And the O’Mornas red-complexioned,
We have visited their territories,
Let us cease from naming the High-Kings.”

The Ghost of Religious Strife

The following is an extract from the Lisburn Herald dated 23rd September 1911.

The following poem may make reference to The Crew area in Glenavy.

The Ghost of Religious Strife

In a shelter’d dell by a crystal rill,
That was fed from a spring on a neighbouring hill,
Where it rose in a bubbling pool,
I sat ‘neath the shade of a willow bough,
That tenderly hung o’er the streamlet’s brow,
And dipped in the waters cool.

I sat till the red sun kissed the Crew,
‘Till the grass was damp with the evening dew,
When, just in the gloaming hour,
A spectre rose from the crystal rill,
With a ghastly stare from a demon will,
Controlled by a fiendish power.

With a hand outstretched, in a gesture proud,
It spoke, and the scho spoke as loud –
"I belong to the after life,
No fear, for I come with a message new,
So note well down what I tell to you,
I’ m the Ghost of Religious Strife.

I’ve roamed your land for a thousand years,
Saw its soil drenched wet with the widows’ tears,
And heard the orphans’ cry:
I’ve seen the hunted man of God
Flee from some worldly pious fraud,
And, like a martyr, die.

I’ve seen her sons outlaw’d and poor,
On barren hill and squalid moor,
For conscience sake alone;
I’ve stood indifferent, heartless by,
Till Mercy closed the glassy eye,
And took them for her own.

Sir, I’m the culprit, I who lied,
Till brave men fought and brave men died,
And ’twas not fate decreed;
‘Twas I who formed the hellish plan
For man to hate his brother man,
For church and state and creed.

Let Ireland cease this bitter strife,
She’ll find a nobler aim in life;
And who will then regret?
Where hatred holds its barren sway,
Where crumbling homes lie in decay,
Will bloom a garden yet."

M.

Poem — The Crew Stone

I found the following poem in the Downer family scrapbook. It has been typed and was composed by Hal Downer. The poem is dated June 1919. The poem has been reproduced exactly from the original typed copy, followed by a short background to the poem penned by the poet.

The Crew Stone

(reproduced by kind permission of the Downer family)

One thousand years ago did Brian Boru

Encamp against the Kinel – Owen at Crew,
The old Crew Stone, where Ulster’s kings were crowned,
By Legends and Antiquity renowned:
The scene of many a fight and many a fray
Stands as a landmark to this very day.

The marks of time and storm it does not hide,
But reverenced still it is for far and wide,
A spreading tree above it used to stand,

But this has been removed by War’s rough hand
Its fights and forays every one are gone,
And all its glories finally withdrawn.

No more to Crew, the warlike chieftain leads
His army, fired with zeal for valorous deeds,
The old Crew Stone has seen such deeds before,
The old Crew Stone will see those deeds no more,
It stands there, rain – swept, rough and gray,

The silent witness of a bygone day.

WHND June 1919

The Kinel – Owen was the leader of the Ulidians at the Battle of Crew. He was defeated by Brian Boru and driven as far as Drumbo, near Lisburn.

A spreading tree used to overshadow the Crew Stone, whence it got its name Craobh Tulcha which means "the spreading tree of the hill."

Waring v McGrath

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Standard 6th June, 1924.

Waring v McGrath

Lucas Waring, Glenavy, sought to recover possession of a dwelling house and farm of land held by Thomas McGrath of Crewe.

Mr. W.G. Maginess appeared for the plaintiff and Mr. Copeland, B.L. (instructed by Mr. D. Barbour Simpson) appeared for the defendant. His honour gave a decree for possession.

Mairs vs Ballance – Shooting of a Greyhound

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Herald Saturday January 26th 1929

Lisburn Quarter Sessions
Shooting of a Greyhound

William E. Mairs, farmer, Stoneyford brought an action against Henry Ballance, farmer, Crewmount, Glenavy to recover £50, loss and damage sustained by reason of the defendant shooting a valuable greyhound without permission.

Mr. B.J. Fox, B.L. (instructed by Mr John Gallery, solicitor, Lurgan) appeared for the plaintiff; and Mr. B. Maginess, B.L. (instructed by W G Maginess & Son, solicitors) for the defendant.

David Mairs, J.P., brother of the plaintiff said he was in the habit of having some friends for a hunt one day in the year. Up till a year ago defendant had no objection to go on his lands, but had withdrawn the permission. On the 14th November last he (witness) and a party of ten, with four dogs and no firearms, met at Glenavy. One of the dogs belonged to himself and the other to his brother. These two dogs raised a hare and went in the direction of the defendant’s house. He heard a shot, and half-a-minute later one of the dogs came back. In consequence of what witness had heard, after meeting his son at the bottom of the field, he proceeded to defendant’s house. On the way he met a man about 50 yards from the place and the man spoke to him. Witness went on to defendant’s house and knocked. Defendant came to the door, and appeared to be rather shaky. Witness informed him that he had come to look for a dog which had been slipped, and that he had heard a shot. Defendant said he had not heard any shot, and gave him permission to look for the dog which he found lying dead at the hedge about the length of the courthouse away. The dog had been shot after the hare was killed. Witness told defendant that it was not very manly of him to shoot the dog. Defendant denied that he shot it and closed the door in witness’s face. Mr Barrett, who rears dogs, saw witness on Friday, and said it was a great dog, and not two years old; that he was trying him that day. Witness added that if the dog belonged to himself he would not take £50 for it.

To his Honour – The dog was shot in the heart

To Mr. Fox – He was shot at close quarters, about ten yards away.

James Mairs, son of the previous witness said he was one of the party hunting. The hare was raised on Dick Scott’s land, then went into Green’s field, and on to defendant’s land, going round towards the house. Witness was about 50 yards away when he lost sight of the dog, and about 150 yards from the defendant’s house. He heard a shot fired and afterwards accompanied his father to defendant’s. He saw where the dog was found. When they were taking it away down the road defendant opened the door looked out and closed the door again.

By Mr. Maginess – He did not see any man working at defendant’s, nor a man in the avenue.

Sergeant Robinson, Aghalee, proved to defendant having a firearms certificate.

Henry Addis, Civil Bill Officer, said he served notice to defendant to attend court on Friday. Defendant told him that he was rather late and that he defendant) would not attend on it, as he was engaged. He also said that "Mairs was poaching about without leave."

John Gallery, solicitor, said he knew the defendant very well. Defendant was not in the court or the precincts on Friday last, as he was looking for him.

William E. Mairs, plaintiff, said he was the owner of the dog, which he got as a present from Mr. Barrett, and he would not have sold him at any price until further on. The dog was worth more than £50. Witness reared dogs for Mr Barrett.

By Mr Maginess – He got it a year and a half ago.

William Torrens, deputy registrar, said that W.E. Mairs had taken out a license in March last for two dogs, one of which was a brown collie and the other a brown and white lurcher.

Dr. Maginess, in addressing his Honour, submitted that even if the defendant was held liable for the shooting of the dog which was trespassing on his land, the value of the dog was very problematical.

His Honour giving judgement, said the action was for damages for shooting the dog. The first question was – did the defendant shoot the dog? And the second was – what was the value of the dog? He did not doubt that the defendant did shoot the dog, and that it was shot at close range. The dog was in the wrong by trespassing and had no right there, but it was not deliberate trespass, as the dog was coursing. He did not think a person was entitled to shoot a greyhound to save the life of a hare. Plaintiff must get damages, but the value of the dog was a difficult thing to decide. Nothing was paid for it. It was a gift, and as to the pedigree all they knew was that it was by Belfast Waterloo and Belfast Woman. He thought he was entitled to take into consideration that it was a very hard thing to shoot the dog. Under those circumstances he would give a decree for £15.

Notice of appeal was served.

Shooting of Greyhound At Glenavy
Appeal Dismissed

In the King’s Bench Division (Northern Ireland) on 15th inst., before Lord Justice Andrews, the appeal was heard of Henry Ballance, Crewmount, Glenavy, defendant and appellant from the Recorder of Belfast who had given a decree for £15 in favour of Mr William Edward Mairs, Stoneyford, plaintiff and respondent, who had claimed £50 for loss and damage sustained by reason of the defendant shooting, as alleged, a valuable greyhound without legal justification.

Mr B J Fox, who appeared for Mairs, said Plaintiff’s brother, Mr David Mairs JP had been in the habit of entertaining his workmen and friends to a days coursing every year, and on the 14th November last they met with our dogs. Defendant had intimated twelve months previously that he would no longer allow coursing on his lands. Two of the dogs killed a hare on an adjoining farm, and the other two dogs, one of which belonged to plaintiff, were then released. They raised a hare, which they chased onto defendant’s land, and the party stopped at the boundary fence. The dogs chased the hare near defendant’s house and a shot was heard, and plaintiff’s dog did not return.

Plaintiff and his brother Mr David Mairs in consequence of a statement made by a man in the employment of defendant, went to his house and knocked at the door. They asked defendant for permission to search for a dog, and he said he heard no shot. On searching they found the dog, shot, ten or eleven yards from the door of Ballance’s house. Plaintiff went back and told defendant that it was a high-handed action on his part to shoot the dog. Defendant denied that he shot the dog and slammed the door in the face of the plaintiff.

Although the decree had been given for £15, the greyhound was worth from £25 to £50.

Lord Justice Andrews – There is rather a slump in greyhounds.

Plaintiff said his dog was a greyhound and not a lurcher, and was named "McClure Report."

Mr. Williamson KC who represented defendant, said defendant admitted that he did shoot the dog, and never at any time denied it. He deliberately did so under extreme provocation. The dog that was licensed was a lurcher, and it would be proved that it was only worth from 5s to 10s.

Defendant bore out counsel’s statement, and said that he never denied at any time that he shot the dog.

Cross-Examined, witness said that when plaintiff came to his house inquiring about the dog he asked witness if he had heard a shot, and witness replied that he knew nothing about the matter.

His Lordship – That was an incorrect statement.

His Lordship, giving judgement, said he could appreciate the fact that defendant had a certain amount of provocation, but he could not characterise as other than a heartless and cruel act the shooting of the dog in a cold-blooded, heartless manner. £15 was probably a liberal estimate of the value of the dog, which had been described as a greyhound and again as a lurcher, and in all the circumstances he felt justified in saying he believed that the Recorder did ample justice; that there should be no appeal, and that the decree for £15 should be confirmed.

Swine Fever, 1931

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter and dated 27th December 1931. It is used with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Lisburn Board of Guardians

Mr James Gregg, V.S., reported as follows – The veterinary department say that swine fever exists at the premises of J. Gilliland, Lisnatrunk; W. Hawthorn, carrycot; Wm. Magee, Ballymacward; Robert Bell, Legaterriff; George White, Lisburn; Joseph McKnight, Ballyclough; Robert Morrow, Whitemountain; John McKee, Ravarnet; William Andrews, Blaris;James McKee, Aghadalgan; Joseph O’Hara, Ballymaclose; Moses Moore, Crew Park; Isaac Matchett, Aghakilmoney; William Kelly, Lisburn; James Archer, Lisburn; and that the disease does not exist at Mary A. Caldwell’s, Crew.

Joseph Neill’s Farm

The following is from The Lisburn Herald dated 10th December 1932.

Crewe, Glenavy
Executors’ sale of valuable farm

We are instructed by Exors., of the late Joseph Neill to sell by auction, at our Lisburn Mart, Tuesday, 20th December, 1932 at One o’clock.

That valuable farm, situate as above, containing 18 acres 2 rds, 34 pers. Statute or thereabouts, held in Fee-simple, Annuity, £3 17s 4d. There is a comfortable Dwelling house, and the out-offices, which are practically all Slated, include Byres for 12 cows, stable for 2 horses with loft over, barn, calf houses, boiling and fowl houses. The lands are all in pasture of good quality, well watered and fenced. there is a pump in yard. This holding is conviently situate off the main road Lisburn to Glenavy, about 7 minutes’ walk from bus and 2 miles from Glenavy. Churning machine gear at auctioneers’ valuation. For title, etc., apply.

Joseph Lockhart, solicitor, Lisburn. Woods & McClure, Auctioneers, Belfast and Lisburn.

Death Notice — Sarah Stewart

The following is an extract from the Lisburn Standard dated 31st December 1932.

In Memoriam
Stewart – In loving memory of my dear sister, Sarah, who departed this life 2nd January, 1930, and was interred in the family burying ground, Crumlin. Ever remembered. Joseph Stewart. Crew, Ballinderry.

Woods & McClure’s Sales

Extract from Lisburn Herald 3rd March 1934

Woods & McClure’s Sales

Crewemount, Glenavy

Letting of Lands

We are instructed by the Executors of the late
Mr. Henry Ballance to Let by Auction,
On the premises, on Saturday, 3rd March,
1934, at 12 noon.
56 acres for cutting and grazing for
The season, in lots to suit purchasers.
All well watered and fenced, and well known to be of very superior quality.
Terms at sale.

Crew Mount

The following can be found in the book "Buildings of County Antrim" by C.E.B. Brett published in 1996. Page 188, No 161. Includes a photograph by M. O’Connell.

Crew Mount, Glenavy Situated at 15 Carnkilly Road, Glenavy. Town land – Crew.

World War 2 Identity Cards

WW2 Identity Card

WW2 Identity Card

During World War 2, National Registration Identity Cards had to be carried.

Photographs and details of cards carried by two residents of the Crew townland can by found on the World War 2 page.

A spruce up for the Wishing Chair of Glenavy

F you had been driving along the Crew Road, outside Glenavy, during the latter stage of last summer then you may just have seen something reminiscent of a bygone era.

At that time the roadmen, who worked for the urban councils, armed themselves with scythes, billhooks, forked stick and honing stone to clean the verges and hedges along the roadsides. The man working at the side of the road, in the townland of Lurganteneil, on this occasion, attracting curious looks from passers-by, was my old friend Billy Abbot from Ballymacash.

Read more…

PRONI Will Calendars

The following information is taken from the will calendars in the PRONI and are reproduced with kind permission of Deputy Keeper of the Records, Public Record Office of Northern Ireland.

Margaret Cairns

Date of Death 28 05 1859
Date of Grant 05 08 1859
Effects under £20
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Letters of Administration of the Personal estate of Margaret Cairns late of Crew in the County of Antrim Widow deceased who died 28 May 1859 at Crew aforesaid were granted at Belfast to John Megowen of Aghagallen in said County the Cousin sole next of kin of said deceased.

George Thompson

Date of Death 07 02 1860
Date of Grant 19 02 1860
Effects under £100
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of George Thompson late of The Crew in the County of Antrim Farmer deceased who died 7 February 1860 at The Crew aforesaid was proved at Belfast by the oaths of Thomas Thompson of Ballynacoy and Samuel Green of Crew Park both in said County Farmer two of the Executors.

William Higginson

Date of Death 04 02 1862
Date of Grant 07 05 1862
Effects under £200
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of William Higginson late of Crew in the County of Antrim Farmer deceased who died 4 February 1862 at same place was proved at Belfast by the oaths of William Higginson of Budore and Arthur Loughlin of Ballymoat (Glenavy) both in the County of Antrim Farmers the Executors.

Isaac McNiece

Date of Death 13 07 1872
Date of Grant 06 12 1872
Effects under £450
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of Isaac M’Niece late of Carnkilley County Antrim Farmer deceased who died 13 July 1872 at same place was proved at Belfast by the oaths of Isaac M’Kinstry M’Niece of Crew and Francis Gibson of Carnkilley both in (Glenavy) said County Farmers the surviving Executors.

Isabella McNeice

Date of Death 12 09 1873
Date of Grant 06 10 1873
Effects under £450
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of Isabella M’Neice late of Crew Glenavy County Antrim Spinster deceased who died 12 September 1873 at same place was proved at Belfast by the oath of Lucas Waring of Lisburn County Antrim Solicitor one of the Executors.

William Cardwell

Date of Death 16 04 1875
18 02 1891
Effects £36 3s
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Letters of Administration of the personal estate of William Cardwell late of Crew County Antrim Farmer who died 16 April 1875 at same place were granted at Belfast to Mary Ann Cardwell of Crew Spinster the Daughter.

Edward Reid

Date of Death 29 09 1875
Date of Grant 08 06 1888
Effects £357 17s 4d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of Edward Reid late of Crew County Antrim Farmer who died 29 September 1875 at same place was proved at Belfast by James Moore of Crew Park Farmer and Eliza Reid of Crew Widow both in said County two of the Executors.

Hugh McWilliams

Date of Death 25 10 1877
Date of Grant 28 04 1880
Effects under £200
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will (with one Codicil) of Hugh M’Williams late of Crew County Antrim Farmer deceased who died 25 October 1877 at same place was proved at Belfast by the oaths of Hugh Gillen of Crew and James Horner of Lurganteneill both in said County Farmers the Executors.

Nelson Reid

Date of Death 26 07 1881
Date of Grant 18 05 1883
Effects £209 10s
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Letters of Administration of the personal estate of Nelson Reid late of Crew Glenavy County Antrim Farmer deceased who died 26 July 1881 at same place were granted at Belfast to Mary Jane Reid Spinster and William Nelson Reid Farmer both of Crew Glenavy two of the Children.

Henry Elwood

Date of Death 25 12 1886
Date of Grant 20 06 1887
Effects £166 15s
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of Henry Elwood late of Crewe County Antrim Farmer who died 25 December 1886 at same place was proved at Belfast by William John Adams of Ballynacoy and Thomas Corbitt of Ballymoat both in said County Farmers the Executors.

Isaac McKinstry McNiece

Date of Death 17 01 1888
Date of Grant 08 02 1888
Effects £14,292 13s 4d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of Isaac M’Kinstry M’Niece late of Crew Mount Glenavy County Antrim Farmer who died 17 January 1888 at same place was proved at Belfast by John Preston of Lisburn Bank Manager Jonathan Peel of Ben-neigh Crumlin Gentleman and Edward J. Johnson of Crumlin General Merchant all in said County the Executors.

Isaac McKinstry McNiece

Date of Death 17 01 1888
Date of Grant 08 02 1888
Effects £14,292 13s 4d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of Isaac M’Kinstry M’Niece late of Crew Mount Glenavy County Antrim Farmer who died 17 January 1888 at same place was proved at Belfast by John Preston of Lisburn Bank Manager Jonathan Peel of Ben-neigh Crumlin Gentleman and Edward J. Johnson of Crumlin General Merchant all in said County the Executors.

George Addis

Date of Death 27 11 1888
Date of Grant 07 01 1889
Effects £135 7s
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of George Addis late of Crew County Antrim Farmer who died 27 November 1888 at same place was proved at Belfast by Joseph Neill of Crew Farmer one of the Executors.

Joseph Savage

Date of Death 19 02 1889
Date of Grant 13 03 1889
Effects £229
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of Joseph Savage late of Ballymote Glenavy County Antrim Farmer who died 19 February 1889 at same place was proved at Belfast by Rowland Savage of Bow-street Lisburn Merchant and Francis William Reid of Crew Glenavy Farmer both in said County the Executors.

Thomas Irwin

Date of Death 03 01 1893
Date of Grant 22 02 1893
Effects £312 13s 3d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of Thomas Irwin late of Crew Glenavy County Antrim late Constable R.I.C. who died 3 January 1893 at same place was proved at Belfast by Joseph Neill of Crew Glenavy Farmer and John Beresford of Larne said County late Head Constable R.I.C. the Executors.

Hugh Gillen

Date of Death 23 12 1895
Date of Grant 23 09 1896
Effects £103
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the will of Hugh Gillen late of Crew, Glenavy, County Antrim, farmer who died 23rd December 1895 granted at Belfast to William John Lavery of Derrymore said County, farmer and Eliza Gillen of Crew, Glenavy, widow.

Charles McCorry

Date of Death 12 05 1896
Date of Grant 18 01 1897
Effects £121
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of Charles M’Corry late of Crew County Antrim Farmer who died 12 May 1896 granted at Belfast to James Ballance of Ballypitmave said County Farmer.

Carson McCorry

Date of Death 20 07 1898
Date of Grant 17 10 1898
Effects £24 15s
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of Carson M’Corry late of Crew Glenavy County Antrim Farmer who died 20 July 1898 granted at Belfast to Henry Ballance of Eden Lodge Kilcreeny said County Farmer

William John McCorry alias McCurry

Date of Death 12 09 1899
Date of Grant 16 03 1900
Effects £48 7s 6d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of William John M’Corry late of Crew County Antrim Farmer who died 12 September 1899 granted at Belfast to James Ballance Farmer.

Andrew Sinclair

Date of Death 28 12 1899
Date of Grant 28 02 1900
Effects £3,758 18s
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of Andrew Sinclair late of The Crew Glenavy County Antrim Retired Farmer who died 28 December 1899 at Aboo House Balmoral Belfast granted at Belfast to John Hanna Engineer.

Denis Gillen

Date of Death 27 11 1900
Date of Grant 11 02 1901
Effects £3,758 18s
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of Denis Gillen late of Crew County Antrim Farmer who died 27 November 1900 granted at Belfast to Maria Gillen Spinster and James Gillen Farmer.

Eliza Jane Stewart

Date of Death 09 04 1901
Date of Grant 08 11 1901
Effects £1
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of Eliza Jane Stewart late of Crew Glenavy County Antrim Widow who died 9 April 1901 granted at Belfast to Joseph Stewart Farmer.

Robert Higginson

Date of Death 09 09 1902
Date of Grant 07 01 1903
Effects £374 10s
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Administration of the estate of Robert Higginson late of Crew County Antrim Farmer who died 9 September 1902 granted at Belfast to Ellen Higginson the Widow.

Mary Anne Cardwell

Date of Death 17 09 1904
Date of Grant 04 03 1905
Effects £327 10s
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Administration of the estate of Mary Anne Cardwell late of Crew Glenavy County Antrim Spinster who died 17 September 1904 granted at Belfast to Margaret Cardwell Spinster.

John Stewart

Date of Death 25 09 1905
Date of Grant 17 11 1905
Effects £353 5s 8d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of John Stewart late of Crew County Antrim Farmer who died 25 September 1905 granted at Belfast to Joseph Stewart Farmer and Thomas A. Irvine Carpenter.

Thomas Sloan

Date of Death 04 05 1907
Date of Grant 12 02 1908
Effects £421 5s 0d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of Thomas Sloan late of Crew County Antrim Farmer who died 4 May 1907 granted at Belfast to James Hendren Schoolmaster and Henry Ballance Farmer.

Mary McKaveney

Date of Death 15 03 1909
Date of Grant 28 06 1909
Effects £474 15s 0d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of Mary McKaveney late of Lurganteneil and Crew County Antrim Widow who died 15 March 1909 granted at Belfast to William John Horner Farmer.

Margaret Cardwell

Date of Death 18 02 1911
Date of Grant 24 05 1911
Effects £186 17s 5d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of Margaret Cardwell late of Crewe Glenavy County Antrim Spinster who died 18 February 1911 granted at Belfast to Alexander Hare Farmer.

George Stewart

Date of Death 07 03 1914
Date of Grant 18 05 1914
Effects £245 11s 10d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of George Stewart late of Crewe County Antrim Farmer who died 7 March 1914 granted at Belfast to Joseph Neill and Joseph Stewart Farmers.

Joseph Reid

Date of Death 07 07 1929
Date of Grant 08 10 1929
Effects £247 0s 0d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Reid Joseph of Crewe Glenavy county Antrim farmer died 7 July 1929 Probate Belfast 8 October to Annie Reid the widow and George Hendren farmer. Effects £247.

Miss Sarah Stewart

Date of Death 02 01 1930
Date of Grant 20 10 1930
Effects £7 0s 0d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Stewart Sarah of Crewe Ballinderry county Antrim spinster died 2 January 1930 Probate Belfast 20 October to Joseph Stewart farmer. Effects £7.

Mr George Fleeton

Date of Death 20 08 1932
Date of Grant 04 01 1933
Effects £202 18s 6d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Fleeton George of Crewe county Antrim farmer died 20 August 1932 Probate Belfast 4 January to Robert Armstrong farmer and Rowland Fleeton cattle dealer. Effects £202 18s. 6d.

Mr Joseph Neill

Date of Death 29 10 1932
Date of Grant 29 11 1932
Effects £1452 16s 0d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Neill Joseph of Crew county Antrim farmer died 29 October 1932 at The County Antrim Infirmary Lisburn Probate Belfast 29 November to Samuel Smyth and William F. Reid farmers. Effects £1452 16s.

Miss Rachel Lewis

Date of Death 07 04 1935
Date of Grant 10 09 1936
Effects £19 0s 0d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Lewis Rachel of Crew county Antrim spinster died 7 April 1935 at The Lisburn District Hospital county Antrim Probate Belfast 10 September to Robert Lewis labourer. Effects £19. D.B.N. P.R. 22/9/53.

Mr William Shephard

Date of Death 27 10 1935
Date of Grant 15 01 1936
Effects £5 15s 0d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Shephard William of Trummery Moira and of Crewe Glenavy both in county Antrim farmer died 27 October 1935 at latter place Probate Belfast 15 January to Daniel Mulholland and William Joseph Shephard farmers. Effects £5 15s.

Mr Joseph Stewart

Date of Death 11 11 1935
Date of Grant 09 01 1936
Effects £220 12s 6d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Stewart Joseph of Crewe county Antrim farmer died 11 November 1935 Probate Belfast 9 January to William Scott farmer and Minnie Lewis married woman. Effects £220 12s. 6d.

Mr Robert Peel

Date of Death 24 02 1937
Date of Grant 28 04 1937
Effects £25 10s 0d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Peel Robert of Crewe county Antrim farmer died 24 February 1937 Probate Belfast 28 April to Margaret Peel the widow. Effects £25 10s.

Mr William John Horner

Date of Death 27 12 1938
Date of Grant 21 07 1939
Effects £1629 8s 7d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Horner William John of Crew county Antrim farmer died 27 December 1938 Administration Belfast 21 July to Charlotte Horner the widow. Effects £1629 8s. 7d.

Mr Francis McCorry

Date of Death 24 01 1940
Date of Grant 01 05 1940
Effects £1291 5s 0d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

McCorry Francis of Crew Upper Ballinderry county Antrim farmer died 24 January 1940 Administration Belfast 1 May to Daniel McCorry farmer. Effects £1291 5s.

Farm Sale

The following is an extract from The Belfast Newsletter dated 7th June 1946 and is reproduced with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Crewe, Glenavy, Co. Antrim
Small farm with attractive dwelling for sale.

At our Lisburn Mart on Tuesday 18th June, one o’clock, for Mr. Rowland Fleeton (who has purchased another Holding)

That desirable Farm of land containing 16 acres, 2 roods, 30 perches S.M. held subject to the low annuity of £3 12s 2d. There is a neat attractive and substantially built cottage residence thereon, all in good repair, having recently been renovated and redecorated, and is ready for immediate occupation. The Outbuildings, which are in good order, include Cattle Sheds, Barn, Coal house &c. Good water supply from Pump. The lands, which are limed and manured, well drained and fenced within the past few years. This valuable farm is situate adjoining the Old Glenavy Road, 10 mins walk bus service Belfast – Lisburn to Crumlin at Sloan’s Corner, 2 ½ miles Glenavy Railway station, 7 miles Lisburn, and can be recommended to anyone interested in a neat compact holding suitable for grazing or mixed farming.

Key for inspection from auctioneers.
Joseph Lockhart and son solicitors, Lisburn
J.D. Martin & Co., F.V.I.,
Auctioneers, Belfast and Lisburn

Sunday School Prize

Sunday School Prize for attendance at Crew Sunday School

Sunday School Prize for attendance at Crew Sunday School

Craew Tulcha (Tree Hill)

The following extract is from the Lisburn Herald dated 3rd April 1948.

Crew Hill (The Crew)

Craew Tulcha really means Tree Hill, but in course of time became known as Crew Hill, which lies in the parishes of Glenavy and Ballinderry. The hill is a conical mound 635 feet high, on the top of which still remains the reputed coronation stone of the Kings of Ulster, and nearby is a rath or fort. In 1003 AD and again in 1099 AD battles were fought between the O’Neills of Tyrone and the O’Neills of Ulster. In 1005AD the Irish warrior, brian Boru, came to Crew Hill to receive a homage and to give presents.

Mowing machine on wrong side of road — 1954

The following is an extract from a Lisburn newspaper dated Friday 8th September 1954.

Mowing machine involved.

Edward Reid, Crewe, Glenavy, was summoned on a charge of failing to keep a horse drawn mowing machine on the left hand side of the road. Mr. Maginess was for the defence.

Constable R.I.L. Charters said that on the afternoon of 21st July he was a passenger in a private car. He noticed a mowing machine, drawn by two horses, approaching on his side of the road. As a lorry approached in the same direction Reid waved to witness to pass him on his left, which meant the car would have gone into the path of the lorry. The blade of Reid’s machine was moving through the grass verge, but was not cutting. When he told Reid that the blade should be up he replied that it was not worth while as he was going only a short distance down the toad. Defendant disrupted the offence and made remarks to the effect that he would want a court ruling on whether his driving of the mowing machine on that side of the road was wrong.

Mr. Maginess submitted that according to the Act it was illegal to drive a vehicle on the wrong side of the road, but argued that the relevant clause did not include a mowing machine. Another Section did not include any reference to a vehicle, simply because it became a law before motor cars were invented. It followed that the same section would not contain any reference to a mowing machine. In a word, he contended that a mowing machine did not come within the scope of the Act.

The District Inspector contended that a mowing machine could be as dangerous in such circumstances as any vehicle named in the Act.

The R.M. said he would hold that Reid had no right to drive his mowing machine along the wrong side of the road, but in the circumstances he would give him the benefit of the Probation Act on payment of costs.

Money for Hospital

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Standard, Friday May 25, 1956.

Hospital Management.
South Antrim Committee meeting

… Finance committee. The report also recorded the receipt of £20 10s from the working Men’s Committee of the Royal Victoria Hospital, which was 25 per cent of the collection made recently in Lisburn, and the sum of £10 from Messrs. D. Barbour Simpson & Co., solicitors, being a bequest from the late Mr. Wesley Kidd, Crew, Glenavy.

"He used his gifts to help his fellow man"
William Calwell 30th July 1863 – 30th July 1953

I had reason to go and visit my maternal grandparents former homestead at Crew, Glenavy a number of years ago with my mother. The farmstead, which had been in the family for generations, had been abandoned in the 1960’s and sold to a neighbouring farmer.

Tumbling Paddy

The Tumbling Paddy at a disused farmstead at the Crew, Glenavy

We visited the derelict cottage and outbuildings and my mother recalled happy memories of her childhood as she passed from room to room in her former homestead. We wandered into the old barn and I noticed a strange farming implement hanging on the side of the barn wall. My mother informed me it was the "tumbling paddy" once used by my grandfather in the fields in the immediate vicinity of the farm. This was a hay collector that was harnessed to the horse. The wooden prongs gathered up every last bit of hay that was in the field. When the collector was full a chain mechanism was operated by the farmer and the hay would tumble from the rake into a mound.

I had mentioned my discovery to another local man and former neighbour of my grandfather. He recalled that there was a similar implement used in a bygone time which was referred to as the "Calwell" hay collector, invented by a man who he believed was linked to the Ballinderry area of Lisburn.

Read more…

Death Notice — Robert Lewis

The following is an extract from a newspaper, source unknown.

Lewis – July 12 1941 at his residence, Crew HIll, Upper Ballinderry, Robert, beloved husband of mary Lewis. Funeral tomorrow (Sunday) at 3pm to Glenavy Churchyard. Friends will please accept this intimation. Deeply regretted by his sorrowing wife and family.

Naturalist’ Field Club Visits Old Graveyard

The following is an extract from the Ulster Star on 18th May 1963 and is used with permission of the paper.

Old Graveyard has visitors.

Places of general interest between Lisburn and Lough Neagh were visited by the Archaeological Section of the Belfast Naturalist’ Field Club on Saturday.

At Blaris old graveyard they inspected the tombstone of Sir Robert Hart, a native of Portadown who became Inspector General of the Chinese Customs and Excise in the latter part of the last century. Mr. Adams, who led the party, had with him a recording of a Chinese resident in Belfast reading the Chinese inscription on the tombstone.

Later the party visted Magheragall old church, Derrymore Basket Factory and Tunny Cut where the "Ballad of Tunny Cut" was recalled. Brief visits were paid to Crew Hill and Ballinderry middle Church.

During the next week the Club will visit the Giant’s Ring, meet at the American War Memorial, Belfast, for a study of the building stones of Belfast, and will probe into Hillsborough’s past.

Youtube Film Clip – The Devil’s Rock

The following link will take you to You Tube and a clip from a film made at the Stewart household in the Crew townland. The Devil’s Rock was a 1938 movie. It was produced by Richard Hayward who also acts and sings in this clip. There are some locals featured in the clip along with the Lambeg Folk dancers. Watch the Film Clip.

David McRoberts marries Mae Higginson

From a newspaper cutting, date/source unknown:

Glenavy. The wedding took place on Tuesday last in the Parish Church of Mr. David McRoberts, son of Mr. Thos. McRoberts of Ballinderry, and Miss Mae Higginson, youngest daughter of Mr and Mrs J Higginson of Crew. The ceremony was performed by Rev. E.H. Gough. B.A., curate assistant, assisted by Rev.S.J.C. Lindsay, Methodist minister. The bride wore a frock of ice blue Chantilly lace with pearl net head-dress and a veil of French net. Miss Mary Haire was bridesmaid, and she was dressed in a frock of Chantilly lace, with head-dress of natural flowers; she is cousin of the bride. The best man was Mr. Jack McRoberts, brother of the bridegroom, as Miss Higginson was a member of the choir, and members formed a guard of honour as the couple left the vestry. The reception was held in Wellington Park Hotel, and the honeymoon is being spent in the Isle of Man.

Comments are closed