Ballypitmave Townland, Glenavy

Statistical Account or Parochial Survey of Ireland

The following is an extract from the “Statistical Account or Parochial Survey of Ireland – Parishes of Glenavy, Camlin & Tullyrusk” by the Rev. Edward Cupples.

At Pitmave is to be seen an ancient cemetery, called the Giant’s Grave, at the spot whence that town land derives its name. It is an enclosed vault, composed of large square stones; being about 35 feet long, 4½ feet wide, and 2 feet deep. About forty years ago, a person of the name of Skelton, at that time land-surveyor to the Earl of Hertford, had the curiosity to open it, and found in it human bones of a gigantic size, as the people of the country report. These bones, when touched, crumbled into dust. At the head of this ancient cemetery, stands a venerable thorn, of a remarkable size. Two other vaults of smaller dimensions are on each side.

Freehold Registration, 1830

The following is an extract from The Belfast News Letter dated 6th April 1830 and is used with permission of The Belfast Newsletter.

The following names are taken from a list of persons applying to register their Freeholds at the next General Quarter Sessions of the Peace to be held in Belfast.

No. 441

Name and Residence of Applicant: Samuel Smith, Ballypitmeve
Description of Freehold, with the names of Barony and Townland in which situated: Houses and land, Upper Massereene, townland of Ballypitmeve
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

Freehold Registrations, 1831

The following is an extract from The Belfast Newsletter dated 30th September 1831 and is used with permission of The Belfast Newsletter.

The following names are taken from a list of persons applying to register their Freeholds at a General Quarter Sessions of the Peace to be held in Belfast on the 24th October, 1831.

No. 134

Name and Residence of Applicant: John Balance, Ballypitmeve
Description of Freehold, with the names of Barony and Townland in which situated: House and land, Upper Massereene, town land of Ballypitmeve.
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

No. 145

Name and Residence of Applicant: John Gracey, Ballypitmeve
Description of Freehold, with the names of Barony and Townland in which situated: House and land, Upper Massereene, town land of Tullynewbane & Ballymineymore
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

No. 148

Name and Residence of Applicant: Robert Gracey, Ballypitmeve
Description of Freehold, with the names of Barony and Townland in which situated: House and land, Upper Massereene, town land of Ballypitmeve
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

No. 157

Name and Residence of Applicant: William Moore, Ballypitmeve
Description of Freehold, with the names of Barony and Townland in which situated: House and land, Upper Massereene, town land of Ballypitmeve
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

No. 163

Name and Residence of Applicant: Roger Patterson, Ballypitmeve
Description of Freehold, with the names of Barony and Townland in which situated: House and land, Upper Massereene, town land of Ballypitmeve
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

Melancholy Event — Mary Smith

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 5th April 1831 and is used with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Melancholy Event – On the 23d ult Mary Smith, daughter of Mr. John Smith, of Ballypitmave, Parish of Glenavy, put a period to her existence, as it is reported, under the following circumstances:- On that day, the family, with the exception of a child about 5 or 6 years of age and herself, had attended the funeral of a deceased relation. In their absence, she possessed herself of a loaded gun, which her father had kept in the house for some days. For his protection, he having had a large sum of money in his custody. Having seated herself in an arm chair, she placed the muzzle of the gun to her breast, and requested the child to pull the trigger. This the child refused to do, and ran out screaming. The unhappy girl, it is conjectured, then forced back the trigger with the end of the ramrod, and the gun exploding, the ball penetrated her heart. The cries of the child attracted some neighbours to the spot, but the vital spark was extinct. The deceased was a quiet, well-conducted young woman, and greatly esteemed in the neighbourhood where she resided.

The Rambling Man from Ballypitmave

The Rambling Man from Ballypitmave

(first published in poetry anthology
Poets in Northern Ireland 1996)

He looks out at me now from the stills, silent,
The man who thatched the homestead
Whitewashed the stone, tilled the field
Shot the fox, and dogs that got too old….

I remember now,
Just before his passing on.
He lay and rambled
On the standard ’70s paisley-patterned sofa
The flames evaporating words
that fell on deaf ears –
they only heard the coughs and splutters
from the chest that got him in the end.
Aged 86.

……Something about his forefathers
Good times and folks and ceili
In Ballypitmave….
Words lost to those who hurried by.

The unmarked grave is all that’s left
In it lies buried all the legends of the past
‘Tis a pity we hadn’t listened at the time…
I hope I’ll never be the rambling man.

 

by Shane McClurg

Marriage Notice – James Smyth and Elizabeth Thompson

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated Tuesday 21st April 1835.

Marriage

At Ballinderry Church, on the 16th inst., by the Rev. Mr. Thompson, Mr. James Smyth, only son of Mr. John Smyth, of Ballypitmave, near Glenavy, to Elizabeth, second daughter of Mr. Samuel Thompson, of the Wire.

Death Notice – Elizabeth McCormick

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated 8th December 1840.

Death

On the 8th ult., at the advanced age of 106, and buried in Glenavy Church-yard, Elizabeth, relict of the late Patrick McCormick, of the townland of Ballypitmave.

Estate of James Murray

The following extract is from the Dublin Evening Mail dated Monday 25th January 1841.

In Chancery

In the matter of John Murray, Nathan Murray, James Murray, Martha Murray and Fortescue Murray, minors. Pursuant to my report made in this matter, and bearing date the 18th day of January, 1841, under the 185th General Rule, I will, on Saturday the 6th day of February, 1841, at my chambers, on the Inns’-quay, City of Dublin, at the hour of One o’clock in the afternoon, set up to be let, to a tenant or tenants, for seven years pending the minority of the said Minor, Nathan Murray, from the 1st day of November, 1840, all that and those the Mansion-house and Lands of Tully, in the Parish of Killead, Barony of Lower Masserene, and County of Antrim, containing 48 Acres Irish plantation measure, be the same more or less, as late in the possession of James Murray, Esq., deceased; and also for the like period, during the minority of the minor, James Murray, all that part of the lands of Ballypitmave, in the parish of Glenavy, said barony of Upper Masserene and county of Antrim, commonly called Johnston’s farm; and also that part of said Lands of Ballypitmave and Ballynacoy, also situate in the said parish of Glenavy, Barony of Upper Masserene, and County of Antrim, containing 127 acres, 1 rood and 19 perches like English statute measure, or thereabouts, also late in the possession of said James Murray, Esq., deceased; also that part of said lands of Ballypitmave,containing 30 acres, 2 roods, English Statue Measure, demised by the late James Murray, Esq., deceased, in his life time to one John Allen, and as late in the possession of said John Allen. Dated this 22nd day of January 1841.

Thomas Goold. For further particulars, apply to Mr. Alexander Arthur, the Receiver, 16, Donegall-place, Belfast; or to Mr. Robert Arthur, his Solicitor, 2 Lower Dominick-street, Dublin.

Estate of James Murray

The following extract is from the Dublin Evening Mail dated 10th March 1841.

In Chancery

In the matter of John Murray, Nathan Murray, James Murray, Martha Murray and Fortescue Murray, minors. Pursuant to my report made in this matter, and bearing date the 18th day of January, 1841, under the 185th General Rule, I will, on Thursday, the 25th day of March 1841, at my chambers, on the Inns’-quay, City of Dublin, at the hour of One o’clock in the afternoon, pursuant to adjournment, set up to be let, to a tenant or tenants, for seven years pending the minority of the said Minor, James Murray, from the 1st day of November, 1840, all that and those that part of the lands of Ballypitmave, in the parish of Glenavy, barony of Upper Masserene and county of Antrim, containing 30 acres, 2 roods, English Statue Measure, demised by the late James Murray, Esq., deceased, in his life time to one John Allen, and as late in the possession of said John Allen. Dated this 1st day of March 1841.

For further particulars, apply to Mr. Alexander Arthur, the Receiver, 16, Donegall-place, Belfast; or to Mr. Robert Arthur, his Solicitor, 2 Lower Dominick-street, Dublin.

Marriage Notice – William Martin and Martha Smith

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated 3rd August 1841.

Marriage

On the 26th ult., by the Rev. Geo. Hill, Mr Wm. Martin of Crosshill, to Martha, youngest daughter of Mr. Jas Smith, Ballypitmave, near Crumlin.

Killultagh Harriers

The following is an extract from the Belfast News Letter dated 28th February 1858 and appears with permission of the Belfast News Letter.

Killultagh harriers – Meets for March 1858 – twelve o’clock – Wednesday 3, at Crawley’s Whins, (White Mountain); Saturday 6, at Dundrod; Wednesday 10, at Brown Moss; Saturday 13, at Tullyrush; Wednesday 17, at Whinny Hill; Saturday 20, at Rock Chapel, Wednesday 24, at Trench House; Saturday 27, at Knockcairn; Wednesday 31, at Ballypitmave.

Extract from Griffith Valuation 1862 – Union of Lisburn (Part of)

County of Antrim — Barony of Massereene — Parish of Glenavy

 

Column 1 : Number and letters of Reference to map
Column 2 : Occupiers
Column 3 : Immediate Lessors
Column 4 : Description of Tenement
Column 5 : Area
Not included Rateable Annual Valuation of land and buildings and Total Annual Valuation of Rateable property
Townland: BALLYPITMAVE
Ordnance Survey map number: 59 & 63
William J. Smyth Marquis of Hertford House, Office Land 16 01 05
2 John McElroy same House, Office Land 08 02 30
3 Reps George Johnston same House, Offices Land 33 00 10
4 Sarah Bailey same House, Offices Land 14 03 00
5 William Greene same House and Land 02 00 30
6 John Officer same House and Land 03 02 10
7 same same House and Land 09 02 10
8 James Ballance same House, Offices Land 22 01 30
9a William Kennedy same House, Offices Land 10 00 10
9b same same House, Offices Land 09 03 30
10 Bernard McGhee same House, Office Land 20 03 15
11a William Kearns same Office and Land 24 02 20
12 same same House, Offices Land 29 01 10
13 same same Land 13 00 25
11b William Lewis William Kearns House and Garden 01 02 00
11c William Peel same House
14 Marquis of Hertford in fee Land 07 03 10
15 James Smyth Marquis of Hertford House, Office Land 39 00 30
16 Mary Smyth same House, Offices Land 30 01 10
17 same same same 10 00 20
18 same same same 03 00 10
19 same same same 06 01 24
20 William Kernahan same Land 12 03 02
21a Edward Scott same House and Land 06 00 04
21b Thomas Scott same House and Land as above
22 Samuel Balance same House, Offices Land 31 01 00
23 same same same 17 02 25
24 Jeremiah Graham same House and Land 01 02 00
25 James Witherupp same House, Office Land 12 02 30
26 James Wilson same House, Office Land 07 00 05
27 George Thompson same House, Office Land 10 03 00
28 same same same 05 00 35
29 William Thompson same House, Offices Land 18 00 30
30 John R. Buckle same House and Land 04 00 02
31 John Thompson same Land 04 01 22
32 John McCann same House and Land 02 02 10
33 William J. Stevenson William Crawford House and Land 01 00 20
34 James Crookes Marquis of Hertford House and Land 01 02 10
35 Thomas Greene same House, Office Land 21 02 00
36 William Moore same House, Offices Land 42 03 20
37 Langford Geddis same Herd’s House, Land 15 02 00
38 George McKnight same House, Offices Land 19 02 25
39 John Magrath same House, Office Land 15 01 00
40 William Hilland same House, Office Land 10 03 10

Marriage Notice – Mairs and Smith

The following is an extract from The Belfast Newsletter dated 10th February 1862 and is used with permission from The Belfast Newsletter.

Marriage

Mairs and Smith – February 7, in the Ballinderry Presbyterian Church, by the Rev. Henry Leebody, Mr. Robert Mairs, Maragall (Magheragall), to Anna, youngest daughter of the late Mr. Samuel Smith, Smithvale, Glenavy.

Marriage Notice – John McNeight and Jane Balance

The following is an extract from the The Belfast Newsletter dated 30th September 1862.

Marriage

McNeight and Ballance – September 29, at the Presbyterian Church, Magheragal, by the Rev R Brown, John third son of George McNeight, Esq., Longstown Lodge, to Jane, eldest daughter of Samuel Balance, Esq., Pitmave House.

Road Repair Contactors

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 25th February 1864.

County Notice – County of Antrim to road contractors. Tenders for the execution of the following works will be received at the office of the secretary of the Grand Jury, County Courthouse, Belfast until nine o’clock pm on Saturday the 12th march next viz:….

No 34 – to keep in repair for three years 800 perches of the road from Lisburn to Glenavy by Ballymacash, between the Old Road and James Smith’s in the townland of Ballypitmave – cost not to exceed £24 per annum.

Death Notice – Isabella Megrath

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 7th July 1866.

Deaths

Megrath – July 5 at the residence of her father, Ballypitmave, Isabella, third daughter of Mr. John Megrath, aged 27 years.

Assault at Ballypitmave

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 8th July 1867 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Antrim Quarter Sessions
Assault at Ballypitmave

Wm Kennedy pleaded guilty to assaulting Jas. Ballance at Ballypitmave on the 15th March.

The Chairman said the defendant had violated the laws of the country. Instead of seeking proper means of redress for any wrong he might have sustained from prosecutor, he had taken the law into his own hands. It appeared that there was some difference between the complainant and the defendant, and that the latter in consequence committed an assault upon the complainant. He had pleaded guilty, and there appeared to be extenuating circumstances in the case. Therefore the order of the Court was that the defendant enter into his own recognisances in £10, to come up for the judgement when called upon.

Birth Extract – 1872 – Scott

The following is an extract from the birth register – U1872/4/1001/3/208.

The birth of a female on 25th July 1872,was registered on 26th July 1872 by a Jane Kinnear, at Ballycessy, Glenavy. She was unable to write her name and made her mark in the register. The child was the daughter of William Scott, a labourer, and Sarah Scott (nee Harbinson).

It is believed this child died shortly after birth. William and Sarah were married at Glenavy Parish Church on 16th July 1870. They had two other children – Margaret Scott (1875 – U1875/144/1018/4/211 refers) and William Thomas Scott (1884 – U1884/4/1001/8/18 refers). William and Sarah relocated to Ballypitmave after 1872.

Farm Sale

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 21st September 1872.

Valuable land of farm of land for sale. The residence of the late J G Murray Esq. To be sold by Public Auction at the Stannus Arms Hotel, Chapel Hill, Lisburn on Tuesday 1st day of October 1872 at the hour of one o’clock. All that part of the townlands of Ballynacoy and Ballypitmave, containing in the whole 214 acres statute measure or thereabouts as lately in possession of said John G Murray situate in the barony of Upper Massereene, and County of Antrim; held under two leases, dated respectively the 1st November, 1829, made by the then Marquis of Hertford to James Murray, since deceased, for three lives, two of which are now in being, at the yearly rent of £109 9s. the lands are all well drained, the greater portion of which have been in meadow and pasture for many years; all well fenced, and have a constant supply of water in the driest season. There is a substantial dwelling house, commanding a fine view of the neighbouring country, fit for the reception of a respectable family, with good office-houses attached. The above lands are situate on the New Road from Glenavy to Belfast and are within eight miles of the latter, six of Lisburn, three and a half of Crumlin, and two of Glenavy, both stations on the Antrim Junction Railway. About 110 acres of the above lands are let to solvent tenants, who pay about £110 10s leaving 104 acres rent free. For terms particulars of title, and conditions of sale, apply to Lucas Waring, Solicitor having the carriage of sale, Lisburn. The purchaser will be required to pay £200 deposit at time of sale.

Death Notice – Thomas Scott

The following extract is from The Belfast Newsletter dated 30th December 1875.

Death

Scott – Dec 25 at Ballypitmave, Glenavy, Thomas fourth son of Edward Scott, aged 26 years.

Prime Grazing Land for Lease

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated 6th April 1876.

Grazing to let – twenty seven acres of Prime grazing to be let, for one year or five years, in Ballypitmave, within one mile of Glenavy Station, and seven from Lisburn; being well fenced, and a constant supply of Water in the driest season. Apply to William Cairns, Ballyvannon; or to William Cairns, Ballypitmave.

Ligoniel Petty Sessions, 1879

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 6th March 1879 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Ligoniel Petty Sessions – these sessions were held yesterday, in the Crown Court, Crumlin Road, before Samuel Archer, Esq. J.P. There were only a few cases entered for hearing. Robert Watters was brought forward on summons, by Constable McGowan on a charge of being drunk at Hannah town, and using offensive language towards complainant. The defendant was fined 10s and costs. Sub Constable John Carson summoned Henry Ballance, Ballypitmave, for leaving his horse and car without being under proper control on the public road at Englishtown. Defendant was fined 10s and costs.

Tenant Loan – Richard Johnston

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated 4th March 1882.

Loans to tenants. The commissioners of public works hereby give notice that the persons named in the Schedule below, having applied to the said Commissioners for Loans under Sec 31 of the Land Law (Ireland) Act 1881 all parties claiming to be interested in amy of the undermentioned Lands, and all other parties whom it may concern, are hereby required, on or before the 18th day of March 1882 to transmit to the said Commissioners (Office of Public Works, Dublin) their dissent or objection (if any) to the said Memorial or Memorials, or any statement therein contained with their reasons for such Dissent or Objection.

No of application: 193
Name of Memorialist making Application for Loan – Richard Johnston
Amount Applied for – £160
Name of Lands in respect of which Memorial for such Loan has been presented – Ballypitmave, Crew
Barony – Massereene Upper
County – Antrim
Dated at the Office of Public Works, Dublin this 2nd day of March, 1882. By order of the Commissioners, Edward Hornsby, Secretary.

Henry Ballance’s Farm

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 22nd July 1882.

James McCann’s Sales by Auction from the 22nd till the 31st July 1882.

29th – at 2.30 pm at Mr Henry Ballance’s Farm, Ballypitmave, Glenavy, Crop, &c.; and at 4pm at Mrs McCann’s Ballypitmave, Glenavy, hay &c.

Farm Sales

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated 28th October 1884.

Two farms of land for sale by Auction. To be sold by auction at the Stannus Plough Arms Hotel, Chapel Hill, Lisburn on Tuesday, 4th November next, at the hour of one o’clock.

Firstly – that farm of land in the townlands of Crewe and Ballypitmave, Glenavy, known as Fir Hill, the property of Richard Johnston containing 39a 3r 34p statute measure, held under Sir Richard Wallace at the yearly judicial rent of £22 15s 4d. About 16 acres of this holding are in permanent meadow and the remainder in pasture and clover.

Secondly – 10 acres and 10 perches, statute measure of meadow situate in the Townland of Ballypitmave aforesaid, held under same Landlord by Lease for the lives of the Prince of Wales, Walter J Stannus, Esq., and Miss Anna Smyth, at the yearly rent of £5 0s 0d.

There is a comfortable slated dwelling-house with suitable office-houses on the first holding, and both are particularly well fenced and drained, and a never failing supply of water runs through them. They are situate about one and a half mile from Ballinderry and Glenavy stations of the Great Northern Railway, and seven from Lisburn. For further particulars apply to William Neill, auctioneer, Lisburn or Robert Kelly & Son, solicitors, Belfast. 17th October, 1884.

Auction – Ivy Hill

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated 6th June 1888.

Executors’ sale of farm of land and crop. I have received instructions from the executors of William Cairns late of Ballypitmave, Glenavy, deceased, to sell by Public Auction, on the premises on Monday 25th June instant, at the hour of twelve o’clock noon, all that valuable farm of land, situate at Ballypitmave, Glenavy, known as “Ivy Hill” containing 40 statute acres thereabouts, held under Sir Richard Wallace, Bart., at a yearly rent of £20 4s 7d. the farm consists of two adjoining holdings; one containing 27 acres and 1 rood, is held by lease for lives, at a yearly rent, including receiver’s fees, of £14 2s 8d; and the other containing 12 a 3r 36p., is held from year to year, at a yearly rent of £6 2s 1d. Said farm is in the highest state of cultivation, well shaped, fenced, and watered having a good pump in the farmyard. There is a comfortable, well situated Dwelling-house thereon, and suitable Office-houses. It adjoins the leading road from Lisburn to Glenavy; 1½ mile distant from Glenavy Railway Station and 8 miles and 3½ miles respectively from the market towns of Lisburn and Crumlin.

At same time and place, immediately after sale of farm, will be sold the following crops, cis: – About two acres of potatoes, two acres wheat, six acres of oats, once acre vetches, six acres of upland grass, first crop; six acres meadow, remainder in grazing, &c – in lots to suit purchasers.
Terms – for farm, £20 per cent deposit, with 2½ per cent. Auction fees; and for crop, 4 months credit on approved security, or 2½ per cent discount for cash. Purchasers to pay 5 per cent auction fees.

All crop & c., to be cleared off premises at 1st November next. For particulars as to title and conditions of sale of farm apply to RH Berryhill, solicitor for vendors, Lisburn. Robt Diamond, auctioneer and valuator, Lisburn. June 1 1888.

Isaac Ballance’s Estate

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 10th May 1888 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

In the High Court of Justice in Ireland.
Probate and Matrimonial Division.

In the goods of Isaac Ballance, formerly of Ballypitmave, in the County of Antrim, but who emigrated to America in 1871, and supposed to be dead. To the wife, child, executors, administrators, or assigns of the said Isaac Ballance.

Take notice that unless you communicate, in writing, to the undernamed, solicitor for James Ballance, a brother of the said Isaac Ballance, within 6 weeks from this insertion, Letters of Administration of the Personal Estate of said deceased will be granted by the above Court to said James Ballance.

Dated this 5th day of May, 1888.

Frederick W. Waring, Solicitor for said James Ballance, 83 Lower Gardiner Street, Dublin, and Lisburn, County Antrim. Robert Laver, assistant Registrar.

Scott v Scott

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Standard Sat June 15 1889

Scott v Scott

This was an ejectment brought by William John Scott against his father, Edward Scott of Ballypitmave, to recover a farm of land on the title.

Mr. Berryhill appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr.
Wilkins for the defendant.

Before the matter was gone into, Mr. Wilkins asked
that the case. be dismissed on the grounds that the
ejectment had been wrongly drawn, and quoted~
from the authorities in support of his contention.

His Honor said that be would amend the civil bill, and allow the case, to proceed.

Mr. Berryhill having handed in the proofs of
the judgment mortgage.

Mr. Wilkins stated that, although be could not
go behind the proofs handed in in that Court, he
was prepared to prove that a gross fraud had been
perpetrated by the son against his father, an old
man of eighty years of age.

His Honor said that he would give a decree, but
suspend the execution for a fortnight in order to
give Mr. Wilkins time to move in the Superior
Courts. to have the mortgage set aside.

Death Notice — Higginson

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Standard – Saturday, March 1st 1890

Sad death of a Balaclava Hero – a man named Thomas Higginson, who was in the famous charge of the Light Brigade at Balaclava, died a few days ago at Ballypitmave. He had been injured by a fall from a cart about a fortnight previously, and ultimately succumbed.

Lady Wallace’s Estate

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated 12th March 1892.

Special telegram. Dublin, Friday….The following advances are sanctioned: – County Antrim – Lady Wallace’s Estate – Ballydonaghy, Budore, Dundrod, Tullyrusk, Ballynacoy, Tullynewbane, Ballyvorally, Ballypitmave, Ballyminymore; 35 holdings…

Tenant Land Purchases

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated Monday 21st March 1892.

Ulster Sales under the Land Purchase Act.

The Irish Land Commission have sanctioned advances to occupying tenants for the purchase of their holdings in pursuance of section 32 of the Purchase of Land (Ireland) Act, 1891, viz:- County Antrim – Lady Wallace’s estate, comprising the lands of Moygarriff, Ballymacrickett, Edenturcher, Ballyminmore, Ballymote, Ballynacoy, Ballypitmave, Crew, Glenavy, Tullynewbane, Innisloughlin, Trummery, Aghadrumglasny, Drumaleet, Derrynaseer, Liscallen, Derryhirk, Ballycairn, Montiaghs, Ballymacilrany, Aghalee, Lurgansemaners, Deerpark, Derrykillultagh, Moneycrumog, Aghadavy, Portmore, Lurgill, Ballykelly, Carnlougherin, Gortnacor (Upper and Lower), Lisnabella, Ballynalargy, Dundrod, Lurganteniel, Ballinderry, Cluntirriff, Ballymaclose, Gortraney, Tullyballydonel, Aghanliss, Ballynascolly, Crew Park, Ballysessy, Killough, and Derryhirk, upwards of 150 holdings. The purchasers include James Scandrett of Motgariff, at £1242; Samuel Carlisle, of Ballynacoy at £1017; Henry Barcroft, of Innisloughlin and Trummery, at £1491; Archibald Lyness, of Derrynaseer, Drumaleet, Liscallen, and Derryhirk at £1837; Anna McDonald of Deerpark at £2852; Alexander Bell of Trummery and Lisnabella, at £1353; and Sarah, Ellen, and Dinah Lonsdale, of Derryhirk, Drumaleet, and Liscallen at £1113.

Dublin.

Pleuro Pneumonia Outbreak

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated 26th May 1892.

Lisburn Board of Guardians. On Tuesday last the weekly meeting of this Board was held under the presidency of Mr. J. Green, vice-president…..The Clerk of Union – James Balance, of Ballypitmave, Glenavy reported here this morning that he had two cattle suffering from what he believed to be pleuro-pnemonia, and that one died last night. – Sergeant McCourt, RIC, Crumlin. The chairman – The Board cannot take any action in the matter until the Guardians receive a report from Mr. Crighton V.S. their inspector.

Pleuro Pneumonia Outbreak

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated 30th May 1892.

Sergeant McCourt, of Crumlin, having reported to the Lisburn Board of Guardians that Mr. James Balance, of Ballypitmave, believed that pleuro pneumonia has broken out amongst his cattle, Mr Crighton, V.S., visited the man’s two farms, and having examined the stock, became convinced that several of them were suffering from the dreaded disease. In order to put the matter outside the region of conjecture, Mr. Ballance slaughtered one animal, and a post-mortem examination showed that it had been suffering from pleuro-pnemonia. Another cow being evidently about to die, it, too, was sent down on Thursday. Accompanied by Mr. Crighton, he drove out to Mr. Ballance’s farms, and having made a careful inspection ordered fifty of the animals to be slaughtered. On Friday Mr. prentice and Sergeant Murray, of Belfast, visited the neighbourhood, and, it is stated, marked about fifty animals to be slaughtered tomorrow. How many of the animals on the adjoining lands will be slaughtered it is impossible to guess, but it is supposed that the number will be considerable. It is hoped that the process of slaughter carried out, under the orders of the inspector, will have the desired effect of preventing the spread of this fatal disease in a prosperous agricultural district.

Pleuro-Pneumonia Scheduled District

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated 16th November 1892.

The Pleuro-pnemonia Order no 145. (Belfast and Lisburn Unions) by the Lord Lieutenant and Privy Council in Ireland. Houghton. We, the Lord Lieutenant-General and general Governor of Ireland, by and with the advice and consent of her Majesty’s Privy Council in Ireland, by virtue and in exercise of the powers in us vested under “The Contagious Diseases (Animals) Acts, 1878 to 1890 and of every other power enabling us in this behalf, do order and it is hereby ordered as follows:-

1. The orders described in the Schedule to this Order are hereby, from and after the commencement of this Order, revoked. Provided that such revocation shall not revive any Order or part of any Order revoked or otherwise affect the past operation of the Orders hereby revoked, or invalidated or make unlawful anything done under the Orders hereby revoked, or affect any licence or authority granted, or any right, title, obligation, or liability accrued thereunder before the commencement of this Order, or interfere with the institution or prosecution of any proceeding in respect of any offence committed against, or any penalty incurred under, the Orders hereby revoked before the commencement of this Order.

2. This Order shall commence and take effect from and immediately after the eighth day of November, one thousand eight hundred and ninety-two. Given at the Council Chamber, Dublin Castle, this 8th day of November, 1892. S Walker,c. MacDermot. Schedule. Orders revoked.

Number: 109.
Date: 1st June 1892
Subject or Short title: Declaring a Pleuro-Pneumonia Scheduled District comprising the townlands of Lurganteniel and Derrykillultagh in the Parish of Ballinderry, and the townlands of Ballypitmave, Crew, Carnkilly Uppers, Carnkilly Lower and Ballymote in the Parish of Glenavy, Poor law union of Lisburn, and County of Antrim.

Cattle Disease

The following extracts cover an unfortunate series of events in the Ballypitmave and Lurganteneil town lands. The owner of the cattle is James Ballance. I believe he is possibly James Ballance born October 1847, died November 1927, a brother of John, the New Zealand Premier.

The following is an extract from Lisburn Standard Saturday May 28th 1892

Cattle disease near Glenavy

The telegram received by the Chairman at the meeting of the board of Guardians on Tuesday was sent to Mr Crighton V.S., and he at once went out to the farms of Mr Jas. Ballance. He carefully inspected the stock both at Ballypitmave and Lurganteneil, and gave it as his decided opinion that a number of them were suffering from pleuro-pnemonia. In order that the matter might be placed outside the domain of conjecture, Mr Ballance slaughtered one animal and a post mortem examination showed that it was far gone in the disease. Another was evidently about to die. It too was knocked on the head and Mr Crighton found that the lungs were in a bad state from pleuro pnemonia. The inspector at once telegraphed to the Vetinary Department, Dublin Castle and was informed in reply that the inspector would be down the next day. Mr Prentice arrived according to promise on Wednesday and Mr Crighton drove him out to see the cattle. One animal was then slaughtered and it was too found to be diseased. On Thursday another visit was paid to both Lurganteneil and Ballypitmave, and today (Friday) Mr Prentice accompanied by Sergeant Murray of Belfast, went out again. It is believed that about 50 head will be slaughtered on the two farms, and some cows on the neighbouring grazing fields may also suffer the same fate. How many altogether may be knocked on the head it is impossible to even guess. It seems Mr Ballance was of the opinion that his cattle suffered from blackleg and it was only on Monday night that he became convinced that the disease was pleuro pnemonia. He immediately reported the fact to Sergeant McCourt of the Crumlin constabulary and the result was as we have briefly stated.

The following extract is from the Lisburn Standard Saturday June 4th 1892

The serious outbreak of Pleuro pnemonia

The Chairman read the following report:- Vetinary Institute 43 Bachelor’s Walk, Lisburn May 31st 1892.

Dear sirs I have to report that last week I was informed as a suspected outbreak of pleuro pnemonia on the farm of Mr James Ballance, Ballypitmave. I visited the place on Tuesday evening 24th inst and found several animals affected with pleuro pnemonia. I also at once sent a wire to the Vet Department, Privy Council Office, Dublin Castle and on Thursday 26th inst, Mr D S Prentice, Government Inspector arrived and he and I visited Ballance’s farm again, and were satisfied that pleuro pnemonia did exist on the premises and farm and as a consequence there are at present 92 cattle of all sorts marked to be slaughtered on Ballance’s farm and adjoining farms and it is very probable that a greater number will be marked for slaughter in a few days. I again visited the place on the 30th inst. Up to the above date there were 60 animals slaughtered on the different premises. On Ballance’s farm near Glenavy one animal was found to be affected with pleuro pnemonia. I shall be able to give you further particulars in due course.

The Chairman said he thought it a serious matter that so many healthy cattle were being slaughtered and if common report was correct, that such a high price was being paid to the owners of the animals knocked on the head

Mr Gilliand – Where does the money come from?

The Assistant clerk – from the Government

Mr Todd – for the present; but if the slaughtering goes on at the same rate as at present, the money set apart for the purpose will become exhausted and then the ratepayers of Ireland will have to pay a levy for the purpose of supplying the needed funds.

Mr Gilliand – How much had this union to pay for the former outbreak of this disease?

The assistant Clerk – about £180

Mr Todd said that owing to the high figure paid to the owners of the slaughtered cattle some people he was informed were anxious to get clear of their stock in the same way.

Mr Bell – Have we anything to do with this matter?

The Chairman – nothing. but we might pass a resolution, deprecating the slaughtering of sound animals, that would call the attention of the local government board to the matter. Mr Todd said it appeared that if a number of cows drank from a large stream of water, all the cattle that used the river were being followed by the Inspector.

The Chairman remarked that he would not let Mr Crighton V S, if he had been visiting a place where there were infected cattle, come near his cows, as his clothing might carry infection. If necessary he (the chairman) would use force to prevent the inspector coming near his stock.

Mr Henry – It is well know that nothing carried infection so effectually as woollen garments.

Mr W J Wilson thought they should adopt a resolution of the kind referred to by the Chairman.

Mr Samuel Wilson thought it might be taken for granted that the Vet Department had employed a competent man as inspector, and to pass a resolution of the kind might be looked upon insulting to the official concerned. He (Mr Wilson) would be in favour of allowing the matter to remain for future consideration. The discussion then terminated. The Assistant Clerk read the following telegram ; Chief Secretary’s Office, Dublin Castle, Clerk of Lisburn Union, Sir with reference to the reported outbreak of pleuro pnemonia at Lurganteneil which has been confirmed on Post mortem examination of the lungs of the affected cattle, the Local Authority should declare the premises an infected place on which the cattle belonging to James Ballance are, in accordance with sec 16 subsection 6 of the Act of 1878 Clerk of Council Vet Department Dublin Castle.

It was then decided to carry out the directions.

Swine Fever

The following is an extract from the Lisburn Standard Saturday 16th June 1894.

Lisburn Board of Guardians
Swine-fever

The Assistant – Clerk read the report of Mr. James Gregg, V.S. which stated that the veterinary department say that swine fever exists at Harriet Geddis’s, Pitmave; Mark Bell’s Legateriff; Sam McBrides, Ballymacbrennan; Goe. Fleeton’s, Crewe; Mary J English’s, Bridge Street, Lisburn; John E. Dickson’s, Ballyscolly; Josiah Archer’s, Toughblane; and it does not exist at Robert Connelly’s and Thomas Walsh’s.

Two years later the following appeared in The Lisburn Standard dated Saturday, September 29th 1894

Alleged case of Pleuro -Pneumonia

The Assistant Clerk (Board of Guardians – Lisburn) read a letter from Sgt. Smith, of the Crumlin Constabulary, reporting that the police there were notified on the 23rd inst. that pleuro – pneumonia, or disease believed to be pleuro – pneumonia, had appeared on the lands of Mr. James Ballance, Ballypitmave. On the lands there were twenty-three head of cattle, but only one was reported to be affected. The sergeant added that he had communicated with the Veterinary Inspector.

Farm Sale – James Smyth

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated Friday 30th August 1895.

Farm near Glenavy. For sale by auction on the premises on 7th September 1895 at two o’clock the property of Mr James Smyth. It contains 33a 0r 37p and is situate in Ballypitmave two miles from Glenavy, seven from Lisburn, and ten from Belfast, held forever, subject to £14 0s 10d yearly for 49 years from 1st May 1893. The Lands are under rotation of crops and are of good quality, and there is a comfortable Dwelling-house; also excellent Offices. For further particulars apply to Walter Smyth, solicitor, Arthur Street, Belfast. Ferguson & Harvey, Auctioneers, Belfast and Lisburn.

Ballance v Belfast Water Commission

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 18th January 1895 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Dublin Law Reports
Court of Appeal – Jan 17
Before the Lord Chancellor, the Lord Chief Justice, Lord Justice Fitzgibbon, and Lord Justice Barry.

Ballance v the Belfast Water Commissioners.

In this case, which was tried at Belfast spring assizes, 1894, Mr. Justice Holmes directed a verdict for the plaintiff, which was subsequently set aside by the Exchequer Division. Hence the appeal. The action had been brought to recover £221, the price of certain minerals which the Commissioners had taken from the plaintiff’s holding for the purposes of their new works at Stoneyford. Bt an agreement dated 23rd December, 1890, the plaintiff gave the Commissioners liberty to enter upon, raise, and take away stones from his holding at Ballypitmave. At that time the plaintiff was a judicial tenant of the holding under Lady Wallace, and had no interest in the minerals. He subsequently purchased his holdings under the Land Purchase Acts, under an agreement dated February, 1891, after which date the Commissioners had removed from the holding the admitted value of the amount claimed. The Commissioners contended that under the agreement they were entitled to the stones which the plaintiff subsequently acquired by virtue of his purchase under the Land Acts. On the other hand, the plaintiff contended that by the agreement he had given to the Commissioners liberty to use the surface of the soil only, and they were bound to pay for the stones in addition, as they would have been bound to pay Lady Wallace if he had not bought the holding under the Land Purchase Acts.

Mr Carton Q.C., with whom were Mr. James Campbell, Q.C., and Mr.Chambers (instructed by Mr. George B. Wilkins, of Lisburn), opened the plaintiff’s case, and had not concluded when the court rose.

Mr. Walker Craig Q.C., and Mr. A.H. Bates (instructed by Messrs McLean and Son) were for the Belfast Water Commissioners.

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 31st January 1895 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Dublin Law Courts
Court of Appeal – January 30
Before the Lord Chancellor, the Lord Chief Justice, Lord Justice Fitzgibbon, and Lord Justice Barry.

Ballance v the Belfast Water Commissioners.

Today, in the court of appeal, judgement was given in the case of Ballance v the Belfast Water Commissioners, which was originally tried before Mr. Justice Holmes and a special jury at the March assizes 1893, when, by direction of the judge, the jury found for the plaintiff the full amount claimed £221. The defendants then removed the Exchequer Divisional Court to have this verdict entered for the defendants, on the ground that on the true construction of the agreement between the parties out of which the action arose, the plaintiff had already paid in full all that he was entitled to. The Lord Chief Baron and Mr. Justice Andrews agreed with the construction placed upon the agreement by the defendants, while Mr. Justice Murphy dissented from their view, and held that Mr. Justice Holmes at the hearing had placed the true construction on the document. By the finding of the majority of the Court, the verdict returned in favour of the plaintiffs at the trial was set aside, and a verdict entered for the defendants, without costs. The plaintiff appealed against this decision to the Court of Appeal, and the case was argued by counsel on both sides on the 15th and 16th last. The facts were that in the month of December 1896 the plaintiff being then a judicial tenant of certain lands in Ballypitmave, near Stoneyford, Lisburn entered into an agreement, in writing, with the Water Commissioners, whereby, in consideration of the payment by them of £100, Ballance agreed to permit the Commissioners and their servants and workmen to enter on his lands, and, without let or hindrance, to raise, take and carry away stones and gravel from a portion thereof, containing two acres and thirty perches, for a period of two years. In said agreement the plaintiff was described as a farmer in occupation of the lands, and it was admitted that the defendant  knew that he was a judicial tenant, and had no right at that time to give away the minerals. In February 1891, the plaintiff Ballance purchased his holding from Lady Wallace, under the Land Purchase Acts, and thereby became owner in fee simple, both of the soil and all minerals thereunder. The defendants contended that at the time the agreement of December 1895 was entered into, the plaintiff represented to them, or to Mr. John Laird who was acting on their behalf, that he was about to purchase under the Land Purchase Acts, and would therefore become owner of the minerals, so that the Commissioners would have to pay him only and no royalties could be demanded from them by Lady Wallace, and that, on the strength of this representation, they agreed to pay the sum of £100, as the price for both surface damage and stones, though they admitted, having offered £75 for surface damage alone, and increased their offer to £100 on the strength of the above representation of intended purchase of Ballance – that is to say, they offered £25 for all the stones they could remove from the holding in 2 years.  Ballance denied this, and said that he asked £100 for surface damage and his interest as a tenant, and that Mr. Laird had first offered him £75, and subsequently increased this offer to £100. He denied that he ever made any representations as to his intention to purchase under the Land Purchase Acts, and claimed that the Commissioners should pay him £221, the admitted values of the stones removed, and which sum the defendants would have had to pay Lady Wallace if he had not purchased under the Land Purchase Acts.

In delivering judgement, the Lord Chancellor said that the case must turn upon the true construction of the agreement of December 1890. At that time Ballance as tenant of the holding from which the stones were taken, had a limited interest in the stones, and a right to prevent anyone from removing them except his landlord, who had certain rights reserved to him by the Land Acts. The words of the agreement were suitable and apposite fro granting to the defendants their interest, and in his view nothing more than this interest passed under the agreement. The subsequent interest in the minerals acquired by Ballance did not go to feed the grant already made by him, for the words of the agreement, though sufficient to pass the fee-simple in the stones, if Ballance had had it at the time the agreement was entered into, could not in law be held to pass an interest subsequently acquired. If Ballance had had no interest whatever in the stones at the date of the agreement, then having subsequently acquired an interest, he would have been bound to give this interest over to the defendants, but having had the tenant’s interest in the stones at the date of the agreement, and the words of the agreement being apposite to pass this and containing no reference to an intention by balance to afterwards acquire the fee, he (the Lord Chancellor) held that this tenant’s interest of Ballance alone passed under the agreement to the defendants, who must, therefore, pay for the stones, which became the property of Ballance after the agreement was entered into.

The Lord Chief Justice, Lord Justice Fitzgibbon, and Lord Justice Barry concurred in the judgement of the Lord Chancellor, upholding the decisions of Mr Justice Holmes and Mr. Justice Murphy, as against those of the Lord Chief Baron and Mr. Justice Andrews. The verdict was accordingly entered for the plaintiff Ballance for the sum of £221, with all costs of the original hearing, arguments, and appeal.

Counsel for the Plaintiff – R.P. Barton Q.C.; J.H. Campbell Q.C.; and James Chambers, Barrister-at-law (instructed by Mr. George Wilkins, Lisburn). For the defendants – J. Walker Craig, Q.C.,and A.H. Bates, Barrister-at-law (instructed by Messrs James McLean and Sons, Belfast).

Deplorable State of Affairs

The following extract gives us an insight into the horrific and unimaginable conditions endured by an 80 year-old man and his wife in the townland in 1897.

Extract from the Lisburn Herald – 22nd May 1897

Deplorable State of Affairs

Sergeant Smith, Crumlin reported, for the information of the guardians, that at about 12 noon on 13th inst., when on duty in the town land of Ballypitmave, he found an old man named Witherup, aged about 80 years, in bed in portion of a house unfit for human habitation. The roof was altogether off the front of the room where the old, dirty bed was situated, and only a portion of the roof on the back part of room remained. In the room where Witherup was lying in bed there was only a donkey, and the floor was all covered with manure. The kitchen was also in an unsanitary state, as was also the lower room, which was occupied by a large number of fowl. The sergeant was of opinion that steps should be taken, otherwise something serious would result. He (the sergeant) was informed by Mr. Ballance that Witherup’s wife resided in the house and slept on the kitchen floor near the fire.

Dr. Mussen also reported that on 15th May he inspected the house occupied by John Witherup, of Ballypitmave. Mr. Ballance repudiated all responsibility in connection with this house, he not having yet received possession of it from Witherup. He (the doctor) recommended that the house be either demolished or re-roofed. It was Mr. Ballance’s intention to adopt the former recommendation when he got possession.

It was resolved that notices be served on the owner and the occupier of the house, with a recommendation that the house be re-roofed within six weeks.

Auction Sales

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated 2nd July 1897.

Ferguson & Harvey’s List of Auction sales.

5th inst at 2 o’clock – 12 acres Meadow Grass, at Dundrod, for Mr John Henderson
7th inst, at 5 o’clock – hay and oats at Tullynewbank, for Mr. Jonathan Bell.
10th inst, at 11 0’clock crops at Ballypitmave, Glenavy for Mr. Thomas Hall
10th inst at 2 o’clock – farm containing 20a 3r 20p situate Ballypitmave for Mr John Mayes
21st inst at 11 o’clock – 30 acres Meadows, at Landgarve, Glenavy, for Miss Peel
21st inst at 2 30 o’clock – 38 acres Meadow Grass at Langford Lodge, for General Pakenham.

Hyland vs Hyland

The following extract is from The Lisburn Herald 25th June 1898.

A Lisburn Slander Action.

Dublin, Thursday. Today – before Master Bruce and a common jury – an action for slander was brought by Sarah Hyland of Ballypitmave, near Lisburn against her brother in law Joseph Hyland, a schoolteacher at Irishtown, Dublin, was heard to assess damages, judgement being allowed to go by Chambers (instructed by Mr. Wilkins) was for plaintiff and Mr. Andrew Todd ( instructed by Mr. Lynch) for the defendant.

Wedding antics and country customs
The Digger recalls how nuptials used to be marked

Postcard depicting newly-weds

Postcard depicting newly-wedsb

A comical postcard from the early 1900’s depicting newly-weds. Perhaps the couple had been “pipped-at-the-post” by the local “horners”. Weddings are often a time when some family members let their “hair-down”. That may well mean participating in pre-nuptial antics at “stag” and “hen” nights, or engaging in some vehicle decoration when seeing off the newly weds. Read more »»

Ivy Hill, Ballypitmave

The following extract is from the Lisburn Herald dated Saturday 25th December 1915.

Ivy Hill, Ballypitmave.

Mrs. Letitia Heaney has instructed us to Let by Auction, on the premises, on Monday, 3rd January, at Two o’clock, about 30 acres lands for the season for grazing and cutting, in lots; well fenced, watered, in good condition.
Usual credit.

J.D. Martin & Co., Auctioneers.

S.H. Ballance Commission – 20th Battalion, R.I.R.

The following extract is from The Lisburn Herald, Saturday, September 30 1916.

Commission.

Second-Lieutenant S.H. Ballance, R.I.R who is the second son of Mr. Henry Ballance, J.P., Eden Lodge, Ballinderry (chairman of the Lisburn Rural Council and member of the County Council), and nephew of the late Hon. John Ballance, Premier of New Zealand. He received his preliminary training with the Cadet Corps of the 19th battalion RIR at Newcastle, County Down, and was then transferred to the 7th Officer Cadet Battalion, being in training with that Corps from Nay to August, 1916, both at the Curragh and Fermoy, County Cork. He has now been gazetted to a commission in the 20th Battalion, R.I.R.

Erskine vs Crawford

The following is an extract from The Lisburn herald, Saturday March 2nd, 1929

“No Jurisdiction”

Mary Erskine, Ballynacoy, summoned William Crawford, Ballypitmave, for, as alleged, allowing his greyhounds to kill 8 head of fowl, her property, value £2.

Mr. Joseph Lockhart, solicitor, appeared for the complainant; and Dr. H.A. Maginness, solicitor, for the defence.

Dr. Maginness raised the point that the Court had no jurisdiction, and the Chairman concurred, remarking that it was a case for another court.

Mr. Lockhart agreed, and said he had been trying to impress that on his client.

The case was accordingly ruled “no jurisdiction,” and no order made in regard to costs.

John Ballance v Catherine Horner

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Standard Friday January 22, 1932

Sheep killed by dog

John Ballance, Ballypitmave, Glenavy, processed Mrs. Catherine Horner, Lurganteniel, for £5, the amount of damage sustained by the plaintiff by reason of the defendant’s dog by worrying sheep, the property of the plaintiff.

Dr. B. Maginess, B.L. (instructed by Messrs. W.G. Maginess and Son, Lisburn) appeared for the plaintiff, and Mr. Austin D. Campbell appeared for the defendant.

Ballance said that he was a farmer near Glenavy. On September 19 he bought fifty sheep for which he paid £41 9s. The defendant, Mrs. Horner, lived about a quarter of a mile from witness, and she had a dog with which witness was familiar. On October 9 his sheep were worried by a dog, and although he could not swear it, he was of opinion that it was the defendant’s dog. On Monday, October 12, he was on the county road and he saw a sheep jump. He went over and found two dogs on top of the sheep, one of the dogs being the defendant’s. He tried to catch the dog but was unsuccessful. he followed it, keeping it in sight, and got to Mrs. Horner’s place first. He asked her where her dog was and she said it was in the box. Witness knew that it was not there. Witness then saw the dog coming about one hundred yards off and asked her was that her dog and she replied in the negative. When it came up she recognised it and witness showed her the wool in its mouth.

Mr. Green, Lisburn, said he bought eight sheep off the plaintiff after the incident he had described. Witness gave him 24s a piece for them, but they should have been worth 30s each.

Mrs. Horner said that she let her dog out for a run about ten o’clock in the morning, after the children had gone to school. The plaintiff came to her on October 12 and asked her where her dog was. He alleged that it was loose all night and that it had worried his sheep. He then made to strike witness. When the dog came witness asked plaintiff to show her the blood on the dog’s mouth and he said blood or not he would make her pay for the sheep.

Cross-examined, witness said that she did not see the wool in the dog’s mouth, and Mr. Ballance did not show it to her.

His Honour said that with regard to damage to the flock the evidence was hardly clear enough. He would give damages in respect of the sheep killed, and made a decree for 32 10s.

Farm Sale

Extract from Lisburn Herald Saturday, March 10th 1923.

Ballypitmave, Glenavy

Mr. James Thompson (who is retiring from farming) has instructed us to sell and let by auction on premises, Monday 19th march, 10.30 o’c. a.m., 2 farm horses, 5 and 6 years, good workers; 10 dairy cows, part springing and others in full milk; brood sow, carrying young; quantity turnips; bam ford reaper; swathe turner; hay collector; chill; drill and lea; ploughs; grubber; harrow; slipe; metal roller; D & S trees; 2 farm carts; 2 sets cart harness; 2 sets plough chains; hay frame; hay cover; wheelbarrow; 6 rundlets; butter butt; troughs; 2 boilers. Barrels; kieves &c. Also 16 acres grazing and cutting and 4 acres potato and turnip ground for oats, in lots. Usual Credit.

J.D. Martin & Co., F.A.I.,
Auctioneers, Belfast and Lisburn.

Ballance House

Ballance House, 1941

Ballance House, 1941

A visitor attraction is situated in the town land of Ballypitmave. It is known as the Ballance House. This is the birthplace of John Ballance who was born on 27 March 1839. He left Ireland and moved to Birmingham eventually moving to New Zealand. There he entered Parliament in 1875 and holding office as Colonial Treasurer (1878), as Minister of Lands, Native Affairs and Defence (1884-7) and as Liberal Premier (1891-3). He died on 27 April 1893. For further information visit the Ballance House website.

John Ballance

The following extract is from the Belfast Telegraph Tuesday August 5th, 1941. Reproduced with permission from the Belfast Telegraph.

The Birthplace of the Co. Antrim Farmer’s Son who became a Premier

If you are a New Zealander and don’t know the country around Belfast very well, this is what you do. You take a bus to Glenavy via Hannahstown, get off at certain crossroads, take the road to the left for half-a-mile, turn to the left till you come to the main road and walk up the drive of the first farm on your left to find yourself looking at the birthplace of John Ballance, one time Premier of New Zealand.

If you know better, you go via Lisburn and the filter-beds. I went the other way.

John Ballance was born the son of a poor farmer at Glenavy in March 1839.

His father was unable to provide him with a good education, but the lad’s own natural desire for learning overcame this handicap. A craving for wider experience and self-expression took him to New Zealand where he took up sheep farming at Wanganui.

This project was not successful, but he had sense enough to pull his money out in time. Words, not wool, were to be the means of his success. He started a paper called the “Wanganui Herald” and suffered the usual setbacks of the young journalist. Soon, however, his real writing ability was recognised, and this coupled, with a newly discovered gift of oratory, eventually won him a seat in Parliament.

His deep understanding of the native question secured him a post in the Cabinet, and shortly afterwards he became Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1891-93.

Being a New Zealander, I was naturally eager to visit his birthplace when I learned of it. John Ballance’s nephew of the same name still lives in the same old cottage at Glenavy.

I reached the end of the drive and there it stood, not quite the same as in our Premier’s day, but picturesque still. Then it had a thatched roof, white mortar walls, tiny windows, a huge open hearth.

But time marches on, and with it decay. One day part of the roof fell in. Now the front of the house is faced with concrete, larger windows have been built in, the roof is covered with slate, the fireplace has changed, but the pots and the kettle still hang over an open fire, suspended by the old crook and crane. Hens and geese still peck nervously about the yard, while the old leaky pump remains swathed in dripping sackcloth.

Stepping gingerly through the indignant feathered community I found Mr. Ballance in the cow byre. After greeting me warmly in true Ulster fashion, his first words were: “Tell me, sir, how high is my uncle’s statue in the grounds of Parliament House”.

The nephew of the John Ballance wouldn’t have called King Billy his father when I told him the statue was as high as his barn.

Inside his kitchen Mr. Ballance spared me a few moments of his precious time (for milking was in progress) to show me newspapers from New Zealand, which he cherished greatly. There were photos and articles of his famous uncle, scenes from new Zealand cities and national life. I was able to mark with a cross for him the very house in which I was born, in the capital city.

Former NZ Premier’s house may be restored.

Ballance House

Lisburn’s Mayor, Alderman Mrs. Elsie Kelsey unveils the plaque at John Ballance’s birthplace at Ballypitmave, Glenavy, watched by members of the family. They are Mrs Eleanor Kathleen Wilson, Roses Lane Ends, Mr. Ballance’s niece, her son, Mr. Robert Wilson, Mrs. Eleanor K. Crawford, Avenure Road, Lurgan, a grand-niece of the New Zealand Prime Minister, Mr. John Ballance, a grand nephew of Mr. Ballance, and his wife, Mrs. Samelia Ballance, who live beside the Prime Minister’s old home.
(Ulster Star April 1978 – with permission of The Ulster Star.)

Former NZ Premier’s house may be restored.
Ceremony unearths Interesting facts.

Local people and others in various parts of Northern ireland have been interested in the ceremony at Lakeview House, Ballypitmave, Glenavy, when Lisburn’s Mayor Alderman Mrs. Elsie Kelsey, unveiled a plaque to mark the birthplace of Mr. John Ballance, Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1891 to 1893.

The Prime Minister’s old house is still standing and I hear that there is a possibility of it being restored.

Many interesting facts about Mr. Ballance came to light through the ceremony and a lot of research went into compiling of information which was described as a unique occasion in the history of Lisburn.

No doubt some New Zealand folk who may have occasion to visit Northern Ireland during the coming years will be interested to hear all about the famous Ulster emigrant.

As Alderman Samuel Semple, Deputy Mayor, said at the luncheon, there have been some famous personalities from the borough who made a name for themselves in various places through their talents and it is hoped that in due course every effort will be made to ensure that they are not forgotten.

The Deputy Mayor referred to efforts to have a museum in Lisburn where members of the public can have the opportunity to see and learn more about things of the past and it is hoped that such a museum will one day become a reality. it is a big subject and will entail much discussion but all the efforts towards such a project will not be in vain it is hoped.

Farmer’s Son Became a Premier

The following is an extract from The Belfast Telegraph dated Thursday 20th July 1944 and appears with permission of the Belfast Telegraph.

Antrim’s Farmer’s Son Became a Premier.

This distinguished son of Ulster deserves a lasting memorial in his native district of Glenavy.

In the admirable exhibition “Ulster’s Sons” at present on view at the Belfast Museum and Art Gallery one was surprised to notice that there was no reference to John Ballance of Glenavy, Co. Antrim, who was Prime Minister of New Zealand 1891 – 1893.

His record is one of which Ulster should be proud, and it is difficult to understand why he has been omitted. Little indeed is said about him at any time when reference is being made to Ulster’s links with New Zealand, although I am not forgetting that the “Belfast Telegraph” on August 5, 1941, published a New Zealander’s interesting account of a visit to his birthplace, giving an illustration of the house and outhouses.

This former Prime Minister was the eldest son of Mr. Samuel Ballance, a farmer, and was born at Ballypitmave, Glenavy, on March 27, 1839. He was educated at the local national school, and on leaving was apprenticed to an ironmonger in Belfast. He became a clerk in a wholesaler ironmonger’s house in Birmingham and migrated to New Zealand, intending to start in business there as a small jeweller. After settling at Wanganui, however, Mr. Ballance took the opportunity of an offer to found a newspaper “The Wanganui Herald,” of which he became editor and remained chief owner for the rest of his life. He was awarded the New Zealand War Medal for his part in raising a troop of volunteer horse during the fighting with the Maori chief, Titokowaru, in 1867.

The Encyclopaedia Britannica reminds us that Mr. Ballance entered the Colony’s Parliament in 1875, and with one interval (1881-1884) sat there till his death. He was a member of three Ministries, those of Sir George Grey (1877 – 1879) and Sir Robert Stout (1884 – 1887), and his own. He was Premier (1891 – 1893).

In the Stout Government his portfolios were those of lands and native affairs, but it was at the Treasury that his prudent and successful finance made the chief mark. As native Minister his policy was pacific and humane, and in his last years he contrived to adjust equitably certain long-standing difficulties relating to reserved lands on the west coast of the North Island.

To Mr. Ballance, also, was due the law reducing the life-tenure of Legislative counsellors to one of seven years. He was actively concerned in the advocacy of women suffrage. But his best known achievement was the imposition in 1891 of the progressive land-tax and progressive income tax. As Premier he brought together the strong experimental and progressive party which long held office in New Zealand. In office he showed debating power, constructive skill and tact in managing men, but in 1893, at the height of his success and popularity, he died at Wellington after a severe surgical operation. Quiet and unassuming in manner, Mr. Ballance, who was a well-read man, always seemed fonder of his books and his chess-board than of public bustle, yet his loss to New Zealand’s political life was great.

A statue was erected to his memory in front of Parliament House Wellington.

I would like to make two suggestions. First, that the Ulster Tourist Development Association should have a plaque erected on the house in Ballypitmave, Glenavy, where he was born and where his nephew, Mr. John Ballance, now lives. Secondly, that the Overseas League should have a tablet placed in Glenavy Parish Church, of which he was a member before emigrating commemorating the service to the Empire of this distinguished son of Ulster.

Norman Robb.

Memorial to John Ballance

Newspaper cutting dated 16 Mary 1978. Source unknown.

Glenavy – A memorial to John Ballance, who was born in the Co. Antrim village and became Prime Minister of New Zealand towards the end of the last century, was unveiled yesterday at Ballypitmave.

The Mayor of Lisburn, Alderman E. Kelsey unveiled a memorial plaque.

John Ballance was born in 1839, the eldest son of Samuel Ballance, a farmer. He was apprenticed to an ironmonger in Belfast, but emigrated to New Zealand, becoming a journalist. He entered the House of Representatives in 1875. In and out of Government over the next 16 years he became Prime Minister in 1891.

His achievements included tax reform, suffrage for women and a humane treatment of the Maoris. He died in 1893 after a severe operation. Twice married, he left no children.

John Ballance, Journalist, Politician and Premier of New Zealand 1839-1893

For those researching the Ballance family an article titled “John Ballance, Journalist, Politician and Premier of New Zealand 1839 – 1893” by B.J. Logan can be found in a publication titled “Ulster Local Studies”, Volume 15 No. 1 Summer 1993.

The article states that the mother of John Ballance was Mary McNeice, a Quaker. It further states that her uncle was Conway McNeice who owned property in the area, including Ram’s Island in Lough Neagh.

Ballypitmave’s Famous Son
by The Digger

In the early 1940’s a New Zealand born correspondent writing in the Belfast Telegraph, related his experience to readers after he had visited the birthplace of John Ballance, who was a Prime Minister of New Zealand during the years 1891 – 1893.

The New Zealand visitor travelled to the townland of Ballypitmave, outside Glenavy where he met with John Ballance, the son of James Ballance, a brother of the former New Zealand Prime minister.

After greeting his visitor, it was reported that John Ballance asked him how high his uncle’s statue was in the grounds of Parliament House. The writer informed him it stood as high as John Ballance’s own barn at his Ballypitmave farm.

The Ballance family were described by the Belfast Newsletter in 1879 as having been one of the “oldest of the English agriculturalists which in the early part of the seventeenth century were brought over to Killultagh by the first Baron Conway.”

Read more »

Wedding – McRoberts / Scott

The following is a newspaper cutting found in a scrap book – 1950 pencilled in.

Wedding. The wedding took place in the Parish Church on Tuesday of Mr. Edward Smyth McRoberts of Brackenhill, Ballinderry and Miss Mary Scott, of Ballypitmave, Glenavy. The ceremony was performed by Rev. A.J.E. Campbell, M.A., Vicar. The bride was attended by her sister, Miss Sadie Scott and the best man was Mr. Thomas D. McRoberts, brother of the groom. The bride was given away by her brother. The bride entered the church to the strains of the wedding march Lohengrin and as the happy pair left the wedding march by Mendelsshon was played. Mr. J. Walker presided at the organ.

Auction of Cattle, Hay and Letting of Lands

Lisburn Standard Friday March 13th 1953

Ballypitmave, Glenavy

Auction of Cattle, Hay etc.
And letting of lands.
I have received instructions form Mr James Balance (owing to ill
health) to sell and let by auction on the premises on Wednesday,
the 19th March, 1953 at 12.30pm.

15 store cattle, a8 small calves (2 – 5) months, Shorthorn pedigree cow (carrying 3rd calf),
Heifer cow (carrying 2nd calf), 2 sows,
tractor trailer for cattle, Austin 10 converted tractor, approximately 45 ton
First-class Meadow hay, quantity of secondary hay.
Also will be let – 73 acres of land for cutting and grazing, in lots.
Terms: Cattle, Hay etc., Cash with commissioner, lands, usual credit.

W.I. Bailie, F.V.I., Auctioneer and Valuer
5 Smithfield Square, Lisburn. Telephone: Lisburn 3396

PRONI Will Calendars

The following information is taken from the will calendars in the PRONI and are reproduced with kind permission of Deputy Keeper of the Records, Public Record Office of Northern Ireland.

George Johnston

Date of Death 24 12 1860
Date of Grant 18 04 1861
Effects under £300
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Letters of Administration (with the Will annexed) of the personal estate of George Johnston late of Ballypitmave in the County of Antrim Farmer deceased who died 24 December 1860 at Lisburn in said County were granted at Belfast to Jane Johnston of Ballypitmave aforesaid the Widow of said deceased.

John Lowery or Lowry

Date of Death 01 11 1859
Date of Grant 12 08 1861
Effects under £100
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of John Lowery late of Tully rush (Tullyrusk?) in the County of Antrim Farmer deceased who died 1 November 1859 at same place was proved at Belfast by the oaths of Samuel Ballance of Ballypitmave and Robert Garret of Tullynewbane both in said County Farmers the Executors.

George McIntyre

Date of Death 28 10 1865
Date of Grant 10 02 1869
Effects under £200
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of George M’Kinstry late of Aghadavey Ballinderry County Antrim Farmer deceased who died 28 October 1865 at same place was proved at Belfast by the oaths of Margaret M’Kinstry of Aghadavey (Widow) and Isaac M’Kinstry M’Niece of Crew Robert M’Cord of Tullyballydonneil (Tullyballydonnell) and Samuel Ballance of Ballypitmave (Farmers) all in Ballinderry aforesaid the Executors.

William Hylands

Date of Death 20 06 1875
Date of Grant 01 03 1876
Effects under £200
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of William Hylands late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Farmer deceased who died 20 June 1875 at same place was proved at Belfast by the oath of William Thompson of Ballypitmave Farmer the Executor.

William John Geddis

Date of Death 13 11 1879
Date of Grant 24 12 1879
Effects under £600
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of William John Geddis late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Farmer deceased who died 13 November 1879 at same place was proved at Belfast by the oath of Harriet Mirian Geddis of Ballypitmave Widow one of the Executors.

Samuel Ballance

Date of Death 01 10 1879
Date of Grant 28 01 1880
Effects under £450
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of Samuel Ballance late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Farmer deceased who died 1 October 1879 at same place was proved at Belfast by the oaths of William Wheeler of Tullyrusk and Michael Collier of Ballynacoy both in same County Farmers the Executors.

William Cairns

Date of Death 21 05 1879
Date of Grant 06 02 1880
Effects under £100
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of William Cairns late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Farmer deceased who died 21 May 1879 at same place was proved at Belfast by the oaths of William Sinclair Clerk of the Lisburn Union Workhouse and John Dickson Hamilton Merchant both of Lisburn two of the Executors.

George McKnight

Date of Death 06 02 1880
Date of Grant 14 04 1882
Effects £318 15s 6d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of George M’Knight late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Farmer deceased who died 6 February 1880 at same place was proved at Belfast by John Connor of Stoneyford and Joseph Hyland of Ballypitmave both in said County Farmers the Executors.

William Kennedy

Date of Death 14 02 1884
Date of Grant 05 03 1884
Effects £282 11s
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of William Kennedy late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Farmer who died 14 February 1884 at same place was proved at Belfast by Thomas Kennedy of same place Farmer one of the Executors.

Thomas Gillen

Date of Death 08 02 1884
Date of Grant 20 02 1885
Effects £82 3s
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of Thomas Gillen late of Ballymote County Antrim Farmer who died 8 February 1884 at same place was proved at Belfast by William John Smyth of Ballypitmave in said County Farmer and Thomas Millen of 58 Verner-street Belfast Shopman the Executors.

James Ballance (senior)

Date of Death 23 05 1885
Date of Grant 18 02 1887
Effects £298 13s
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Letters of Administration of the personal estate of James Ballance (Senior) late of Lower Ballypitmave County Antrim Farmer who died 23 May 1885 at same place were granted at Belfast to James Ballance of Lower Ballypitmave Farmer a Child.

John Officer

Date of Death 09 03 1886
Date of Grant 14 03 1887
Effects £65 18s 9d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of John Officer late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Farmer who died 9 March 1886 at same place was proved at Belfast by James Ballance of Ballypitmave Lower in said County Farmer one of the Executors.

James Johnston

Date of Death 11 11 1888
Date of Grant 10 12 1888
Effects £143 12s 6d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Letters of Administration of the personal estate of James Johnston late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Farmer who died 11 November 1888 at same place were granted at Belfast to Margaret Johnston of Ballypitmave the Widow.

John Arthur

Date of Death 03 02 1889
Date of Grant 01 04 1889
Effects £276 17s 10d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Letters of Administration of the personal estate of John Arthur Thompson late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Farmer who died 3 February 1889 at same place were granted at Belfast to William Thompson of Ballypitmave Farmer the Father.

Joseph Campbell

Date of Death 01 03 1890
Date of Grant 04 06 1890
Effects £287
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of Joseph Campbell late of Drumnakelly County Antrim Farmer who died 1 March 1890 at same place was proved at Belfast by Joseph Campbell of Drumnakelly and Joseph Hyland of Ballypitmave said County Farmers the Executors.

William Thompson

Date of Death 11 03 1890
Date of Grant 02 04 1890
Effects £354 11s 9d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of William Thompson late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Farmer who died 11 March 1890 at same place was proved at Belfast by Joseph Hyland of Ballypitmave William John Adams and Geddis Thompson both of Killultagh said County Farmers the Executors.

William Scott

Date of Death 16 01 1892
Date of Grant 17 02 1892
Effects £2
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of William Scott late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Labourer who died 16 January 1892 at same place was proved at Belfast by William J. M’Keown of Glenavy said County Shop Assistant and Sarah Scott Widow of Ballypitmave the Executors.

William Crawford

(Glenavy Parish Church, Grave 56)

Date of Death 26 03 1894
Date of Grant 16 05 1894
Effects £204 0s 6d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of William Crawford late of Ballinacoy County Antrim Farmer who died 26 March 1894 at same place was proved at Belfast by Thomas Green of Ballypitmave said County Farmer the surviving Executor.

William John Green

Date of Death 01 04 1894 approx
Date of Grant 07 12 1894
Effects £244 14s 4d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Letters of Administration of the personal estate of William John Green late of 95 Cambrai-street Belfast Master Mariner who died in the month of April 1894 at Sea were granted at Belfast to William Green of Ballypitmave County Antrim Retired Fireman the Father.

Joseph Hyland

Date of Death 08 01 1894
Date of Grant 23 02 1894
Effects £149 1s 3d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

The Will of Joseph Hyland late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Farmer who died 8 January 1894 at same place was proved at Belfast by Elizabeth Hyland of Ballypitmave Widow one of the Executors.

Robert Mayers

Date of Death 26 12 1896
Date of Grant 05 02 1897
Effects £251 18s 6d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of Robert Mayers late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Farmer who died 26 December 1896 granted at Belfast to Anna Mayers of Ballypitmave Widow and Joseph Neill of Crewe Farmer both said County

Charles McCorry

Date of Death 12 05 1896
Date of Grant 18 01 1897
Effects £121
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of Charles M’Corry late of Crew County Antrim Farmer who died 12 May 1896 granted at Belfast to James Ballance of Ballypitmave said County Farmer.

George Ferris

Date of Death 08 03 1898
Date of Grant 01 06 1898
Effects £262 17s 6d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of George Ferris late of Glenavy County Antrim Farmer and Publican who died 8 March 1898 granted at Belfast to Sarah Ferris of Glenavy Widow and James Ballance of Ballypitmave said County Farmer.

William John Smyth

Date of Death 08 03 1898
Date of Grant 30 03 1898
Effects £351 14s 6d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of William John Smyth late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Farmer who died 8 March 1898 granted at Belfast to Thomas Kennedy and Robert Bailey both of Ballypitmave Farmers.

Robert Bailey

Date of Death 07 10 1903
Date of Grant 06 11 1903
Effects £52
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Administration of the estate of Robert Bailey late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Farmer who died 7 October 1903 granted at Belfast to Martha Bailey the Widow.

Daniel McIlroy

Date of Death 24 02 1905
Date of Grant 22 03 1905
Effects £208
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of Daniel M’Ilroy late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Farmer who died 24 February 1905 granted at Belfast to James Ballance and Thomas Kennedy Farmers.

Isabella Maria Hunter

Date of Death 02 01 1907
Date of Grant 15 04 1907
Effects £593 16s 7d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of Isabella Maria Hunter late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Widow who died 2 January 1907 granted at Belfast to William John Geddis Farmer.

Anna Mayers

Date of Death 08 04 1910
Date of Grant 25 04 1910
Effects £360 16s 7d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of Anna Mayers late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Widow who died 8 April 1910 granted at Belfast to Joseph Neill Farmer.

Thomas Hall

(Glenavy Parish Church, Grave 356)

Date of Death 01 04 1912
Date of Grant 09 06 1913
Effects £337 9s 2d
Registry Belfast

Full Abstract:

Probate of the Will of Thomas Hall late of Ballypitmave County Antrim Farmer who died 1 April 1912 granted at Belfast to James Johnston Farmer.

Mary Scott (nee McClurg)

Mary Scott nee McClurg (1893-1950)

Mary Scott nee McClurg
7 Jun 1893 – 29 Jan 1950
She was the wife of William Thomas Scott

Early days of the Ulster Tower at Thiepval and Lisburn
by The Digger

DURING my childhood days at home, a system of communication existed between our household and several elderly neighbours. A high pitched “Yoo hoo, yoo hoo” or the rapid banging of a stone on the outside wall would be the first indication that either party wished to make contact.

On one of those occasions I was summoned to the hedgerow and spoken to by the elderly lady who handed me an old telescope that had seen better days. It was a gift and I was told it was being passed onto me as a representative of the next generation in order to ensure its preservation.

I was so engrossed in the newly acquired toy that the story being related to me by my elderly neighbour about the background and history was lost.

At that time the story of the telescope having been used to view the countryside around Thiepval from a tower paled into insignificance. My understanding of the place-name “Thiepval” then went no further than the name of the military barracks in Lisburn and it would be many years later I would learn of its true historical significance-

“Was ever a charge in the world like this?
Shall ever a son of Ulster miss
A fame that is wholly and solely his —
A fame of sublimest splendour?”

The opening lines of a poem titled “The Charge of the Ulster Brigade at Thiepval July 1st 1916.” penned by Samuel Kennedy Cowan, born in Lisburn in 1850. Read more »

‘Snow’ place like home as winter grips Lisburn
by The Digger

Clearing snow when falls were measured in feet - believed to be in the Glenavy area

Photograph kindly provided by Caroline Price, shows a group of people, believed to be in the Glenavy area, clearing snow when falls were measured in feet

AUTUMN has passed and we are now firmly in winter’s grip. There’s no rose without a thorn. The sound of tapping the glass on the barometer is a sound mostly confined to the past now. The changing of the hand indicated a change in the weather.

“The north wind doth blow, and we shall have snow” may also be an indicator surpassed by modern technology.

Most cars now have a digital readout providing us with up to the minute temperature readings with a frost warning indicator in case we have failed to noticed the glistening on the road’s surface.

A light dusting of snow can have an immediate effect on our normal daily routine, affecting our transport systems and schools. There are still many people in the district who can recall a time when snowfalls were measured in feet and not inches. There is an inscription on a headstone in the graveyard at Dundrod Presbyterian church which is a stark reminder of a previous winter. An unfortunate member of that congregation lost his life when he, as the inscription states, “perished in a snow storm” on the 18th January, 1941. That tragic event occurred in the area close to Divis mountain. I heard another story from that area of a man who set out on foot in heavy snow drifts and when he returned he related the story that he had been able to look down the chimney tops of neighbouring homesteads as he passed by! Read more »

Ballypitmave Land to be Let

The following is an extract from The Ulster Star dated 21st March 1975 and appears with permission of The Ulster Star.

BALLYPITMAVE, GLENAVY
IMPORTANT LETTING OF
49.5 ACRES

We are instructed by J.A.H. McClelland, Esq., to let by
Public Auction on Saturday, 29th March at 2.00pm on the
Premises 49.5 acres for grazing and cutting. The land are
Well watered and fenced with frontage to the County Road.

Usual terms.
ALEXANDER REID
& FRAZER,
CHARTERED SURVEYORS,
ENGLISH STREET, DOWNPATRICK.
TELEPHONE DOWNPATRICK 2821.

Beattie Hill Freehold

The following is an extract from The Ulster Star dated 3rd October 1975 and appears with permission of The Ulster Star.
For Private Sale

Beattie Hill, Ballypitmave, Glenavy
21 Acres Freehold
Agricultural lands with outbuildings.
(For Miss Jane A Reid)

These valuable lands containing 21a 0r 8p are situated adjoining the main Lisburn – Glenavy Road, about one mile from Glenavy village and seven miles Lisburn. They are laid out in suitable diversions all under grazing, well fenced and watered and have an extensive frontage to the main road. Mains water available. The lands can also be approached from the Glenavy – Stoneyford Road.
Part of the lands have an elevated situation over-looking Lough Neagh and as there is a disused cottage and a few outbuildings on the lands this would provide a choice site for a bungalow subject to planning permission.

John Ballance – Parliament Grounds, Wellington NZ

A series of photographs taken by former Glenavy resident Caroline O’Connor whilst visiting Parliament grounds in Wellington, New Zealand.

The statue of the former premier – John Ballance who hailed from Glenavy. Many thanks Caroline!!

ballance-3
ballance-4
ballance-1
ballance-5
ballance-2

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