Ballyscolly Townland, Ballinderry

Freehold Registrations, 1830

The following is an extract from The Belfast Newsletter dated 6th April 1830 and is used with permission of The Belfast Newsletter.

The following names are taken from a list of persons applying to register their Freeholds at the next General Quarter Sessions of the Peace to be held in Belfast.

No. 9

Name and Residence of Applicant: James Maxwell, Ballyscolly
Description of Freehold, with the names of Barony and Townland in which situated: Houses and land, Upper Massereene, townland of Ballyscolly
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

No. 47

Name and Residence of Applicant: William Wright, Brackenhill
Description of Freehold, with the names of Barony and Townland in which situated: Lands, Upper Massereene, townland of Ballyscolly
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

Freehold Registration, 1831

The following is an extract from The Belfast Newsletter dated 30th September 1831 and is used with permission of The Belfast Newsletter.

The following names are taken from a list of persons applying to register their Freeholds at a General Quarter Sessions of the Peace to be held in Belfast on the 24th October, 1831.

No. 119

Name and Residence of Applicant: Ralph Russell, Ballyscolly
Description of Freehold, with the names of Barony and Townland in which situated: House and land, Upper Massereene, town land of Aghacarnon
Yearly Value to be registered: £10

Board of Guardians election

The following is an extract from the Lisburn Standard Saturday March 9th 1889

Lisburn Board of Guardians, held on Tuesday last at 12 o’clock. The following was elected:

Ballyscolly – John Green, Ballyscolly

Swine Fever

The following is an extract from the Lisburn Standard Saturday 16th June 1894.

Lisburn Board of Guardians
Swine-fever

The Assistant – Clerk read the report of Mr. James Gregg, V.S. which stated that the veterinary department say that swine fever exists at Harriet Geddis’s, Pitmave; Mark Bell’s Legateriff; Sam McBrides, Ballymacbrennan; Goe. Fleeton’s, Crewe; Mary J English’s, Bridge Street, Lisburn; John E. Dickson’s, Ballyscolly; Josiah Archer’s, Toughblane; and it does not exist at Robert Connelly’s and Thomas Walsh’s.

"Buildings of County Antrim"

The following can be found in the book "Buildings of County Antrim by C.E.B. Brett published in 1996." page 198 no 172. Includes a photograph by M. O’Connell.

Oatland Cottage, Upper Ballinderry. Town land – Ballyscolly.

Parish Church (C of I), Upper Ballinderry

The following can be found in the book "Buildings of County Antrim by C.E.B. Brett published in 1996." page 48, no 42. Includes a photograph by M. O’Connell.

Parish Church (C of I) Upper Ballinderry. Situated off road from Upper Ballinderry to Lower Ballinderry. Town land – Ballyscolly.

Milestone

Ballinderry Milestone

A rare sight now — a milestone

Ballinderry Milestone

A rare sight now — a milestone

Greene v McCorry

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Standard 6th June, 1924.

Greene V McCorry

Mrs Annie W. Greene, of Hareview, Upper Ballinderry, Lisburn, brought an ejectment civil bill for over holding against Daniel McCorry, of Ballyscolly, Upper Ballinderry, to recover possession of a house in possession of defendant.

Mr. John McConnell, solicitor, appeared for plaintiff, who stated that the house was set in February 1923, to the defendant at 2s per week on the condition that he would assist with general farm work, etc., when required. Shortly after getting into the house he got constant work with a local farmer and hence could not work for plaintiff.

Mr. McConnell said defendant had called at his office on the morning of the Court and said he was arranging to get a house at the 1st July, and his Honour gave a decree for possession, not to be executed until this date.

Oak Masonic Lodge 326, Ballinderry

Oak Masonic Lodge number 326 meets at Ballinderry Masonic Hall and is situated at 87 Ballinderry Road, Upper Ballinderry.

Details of the lodge can be found at Provincial Grand Lodge of Antrim website: http://pglantrim.org/hallBallinderry.shtml.

Read more…

Coroner’s Verdict re Joseph Crossey

The following extract is from a supplement to The Lisburn Standard, Friday, June 19th 1945.

Ballinderry Man’s death
Body discovered at the side of the road.
The Inquest Proceedings.

On Friday afternoon in Lisburn Dr. H. Baird held an inquest on Joseph Crossey (59) of Ballyscolly, Ballinderry who was found dead on the side of the road at derrykillultagh on Thursday of last week.

Head Constable J.B. Iago conducted the proceedings on behalf of the Crown, and Mr. Jefferson (messrs C & H Jefferson, Belfast) appeared for Mr. WWm. Belshaw, J.P., the deceased’s employer.

Henry Hill Crossey, son of the deceased, gave evidence of identification. He said he could not recall his father ever being attended by a doctor, but had heard him complain of a headache at times, which deceased said was caused by fumes from the lime kiln where he worked.

Thomas Fenning, foreman at the kiln head at Knocknadona, said that on Thursday deceased and three other men were not loking too well and he knew their condition was due to fumes coming from the kiln head, so he directed them to another job. After dinner the three other men said they were going home. Shortly after Crossey came to witness and he did not look too well. He sadi he was going home and left with his bicycle at about 2.15pm. When the wind blew from the south more fumes than usual came from the kiln head.

Frank Marsden said that about 2.30pm on Tuesday he found deceased lying on his bicycle at the side of the road. he believed he was dead.

Dr. J.G. Johnston, M.C., J.P., said there were no signs of violence or injury on the body. In his opinion death was due to heart failure caused by coronary embolism. If the fumes at the lime kiln had anything to do with Crossey’s death he thought it would have happened at the works and not some miles away.

The Coroner said that as there was a certain amount of doubt about the fumes he would return an open verdict.

Sympahy with the bereaved relatives was expressed by the coroner.

Joining in the expression, the Head Constable said Mr. Belshaw had an understanding that when workers became ill at the kiln head they were at liberty to go home without suffering any loss of wages.

Mr. Jefferson said deceased had been employed by Mr. Belshaw for over 20 years and was a most valuable worker.

Mr. Belshaw felt and would feel his loss very much.

Ballinderry Antiques

The following is an extract from the Ulster Star dated 28th May 1966 and appears with permission of the Ulster Star.

Ballinderry Antiques
Ballinderry Upper, Lisburn.

Opening 9am Wednesday, June 1st

Antiques, bronzes, brass,copper,occasional furniture,
plate,Bric-a-brac, porcelain, decorative china, glass, silver.

Browsers welcome.

Hours: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday 9am – 9pm

Thursday 9am – 1pm also 7.30 pm – 9.30 pm

Friday – Sat. 9am – 9pm (Closed for lunch 1pm – 2pm)

Teas served on opening day.

On main road, M.1. Moira to Airport.

Marsden Family

The following extract is from the Ulster Star dated 1st February 1974 and appears with permission of the Ulster Star.

Trains in the family.

The Marsden family of Ballinderry certainly believe in keeping a family of tradition going. For more than a century now, at least one member of the family in each generation has worked "on the railway."

This long family tradition began back in 1971, when the Antrim – Lisburn line originally opened. It was then that Mr. Samuel Marsden became the first signalman.

After his death, the post was taken over by his son Alex and later his grandsons followed in the family footsteps – Norman and John Marsden.

Samuel Marsden

Samuel Marsden

Great grandsons.

But the story doesn’t end there. Far from it, in fact. Because there are three of Samuel Marsden’s great grandsons working for Northern Ireland Railways – Terence, James and Patrick Marsden!

And with the re-opening of the Antrim line, it looks as though the family will have plenty to keep them going for a few more generations to come.

There were other members of the family who also kept the family "line" going – John, James and engine-drivers Sam, all sons of the tradition founder.

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