Events – Glenavy Parish

Glenavy man escapes from Downpatrick Gaol

The following is from the Belfast Newsletter dated Fri 18th July – Tue 22nd July 1788 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Escaped from Downpatrick Gaol, by having made a breach in the wall, on Thursday evening, 10th July, 1788, between the hours of fix and feven o’clock, William, otherwife James Killing, aged about 26 or 28 years, about 5 feet 9 or 10 inches high, a ftout well made man, brown eyes, long black hair, ruddy complexion, was born in Glenavy, county of Antrim, lived fome time in Hillfborough with Mr. McPherfon as Hoftler; his apparel when he efcaped, a brown coat, Fcarlet waisfcoat, and corduroy breeches.

(others are also named)

Now I Jofeph Robinfon, do offer a reward of three pounds for each or either of them, or twelve pounds to whoever fhall lodge them all in any of His Majesty’s goals in this kingdom.

Jofeph Robinfon, Gaoler, returns his moft grateful thanks to the Gentlemen of Downpatrick, for their affiftance in apprehending fix others who had made their efcape.

I hereby offer a further fum of Twenty Guineas to the perfon or perfons who fhall apprehend the above-mentioned felons.

William Johnston,
Sheriff.

Death Notice – William Stewart

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated 30th December 1828 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

At his country seat near Quebec, on the 28th August last, William Stewart, Esq. Surgeon to his Majesty’s forces of Upper and Lower Canada, for nearly 20 years. And son of the late John Stewart., Esq., near Glenavy. It is the afflicting office of those who are left to deplore the loss of dear and invaluable friends, to have the painful task to announce to the world the public and private loss sustained by their removal. The lamented death of Surgeon Stewart is a renewed instance of the instability of all that is valued by man in this valley of woe. His professional talents as a Military Surgeon both in theory and practice were equalled by his worth as a private gentleman, and as an ornament to the high circles of society in which he moved. The irreparable loss sustained in this removal of one who was so generally beloved and esteemed, will long be felt in the hearts of those who can bear witness to his many amiable qualities, and the solid virtues which distinguished him in his walk through life. His remains were interred in the Cathedral of Quebec with all the honors of war that military procession could confer.

Death – Mrs Murray

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated 3rd February 1829 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

In the 64th year of her age, at Glenavy, on the 24th ult after a severe and long protracted illness, borne with Christian resignation, Mrs Murray, wife of Mr. James Murray, Surgeon.

Affray at Glenavy

A rare account of an affray in the town land of Ballymacricket was reported by the Belfast Newsletter on 30th June 1829. I spoke to a person believed to be a relative of one of the persons named in the incident. They had never heard the story. I have not yet found out the result of the trial in the Crown Court.

Thanks to the Belfast Newsletter for permission to use the following extracts:

Belfast Newsletter – 30th June 1829

AFFRAY AT GLENAVY

On the evening of St. John’s day, 24th inst. There was in Glenavy much rioting, which was renewed again the next morning, and became so alarming in its consequences as to require the Lisburn Police to be sent for. It originated as follows:- On the evening above-mentioned, a drummer and fifer, who had been attending the Masonic procession, were returning home, when they were attacked in the most violent manner and much abused by some Roman Catholics. The Freemasons, finding they could not get home without endangering their lives, took them back and kept them all night. In the morning it was understood that the R.Catholics intended to way lay the drummer and fifer on the way home, and in consequence, about twelve Freemasons thought it their duty to see them safe out of Glenavy. They had not gone far, when the three men came up to them and attempted to pull the drum from the back of the man who was carrying it, and threatened to break it. The Freemasons (who happened to be Protestants) endeavoured to save the drum from being broken, when instantly, thirty or forty men rushed on them from behind the ditches where they had been lying concealed, and beat and abused the Freemasons in a brutal manner, who had to run for their lives; although some of them had taken the precaution to carry arms with them, that they might the better be able to protect the drummer and fifer from the intended assault! This is conciliation! – From a Correspondent.

Belfast Newsletter – Friday August 14th 1829

County of Antrim Assizes – Crown Court – Thursday, Aug. 13

William John Ingram, for an assault on Robert Heaney at Ballymacricket, on 25th June last. – This case occupied the Court the most part of the day, and the Jury retired; after some time the foreman intimated (through the bailiff) to his Lordship that he wished to speak to him – On his being admitted, he stated that there was no likelihood of their agreeing on the case; when his Lordship told them that he could not relieve them at that time as there was a trial going on; but told the foreman to retire, and as soon as the trial then going on was finished, he would consult Counsel, and send for them. The trial being finished, his Lordship and the different Counsellors had a long consultation as to the law that constituted a riot, rioters &c and then sent for the Jury and explained the law on this head to them. The Jury again retired, but shortly after came back, stating they could not yet agree – In the mean time his Lordship and Counsellors had some further discussion on the point at issue, and his Lordship gave further explanations o the Jury, who retired a third time, and had not come to a conclusion at six o’clock when our Reporter left the Court.

Belfast Newsletter – Tuesday 18th August 1829

County of Antrim Assizes – Crown Court – Thursday, August 13
Riot at Glenavy

Wm John Ingram, for a riot and assault, at Ballymacricket, near Glenavy, on 25th June last, and with grievously wounding Robert Heney, Jun.

Robert Heney – On 25th June heard a drum and fife at his door; went out, and saw "a deal of people", men and women, passing by, and seemed as if "haizing through other", heard his sister giving a shout that his father was killed saw his father lying in a drain and three persons on the top of him; one person had hold of a bayonet, and his father had the other end of it – went to assist his father; prisoner came across the road, and struck witness on the head with a sword or bayonet, and wounded him severely – prisoner struck him with a second blow on the side with a large stone – did not see prisoner amongst the party before that – witness had nothing in his hand – had been weaving before these people came up. – Cross ex. – Lives with his father – had been out the day before this, (St. John’s Day;) can’t say but he was in Glenavy – saw the drum and fife with the Freemasons that day – did not know that they had to pass his house next morning – does not know where the party were going to – his father went out to shear the cow’s grass – knows William Morgan who is a neighbour – some more of the neighbours were out – can’t say how many – could not swear there not twenty – can’t say that his neighbours gave the drummer and fifer a beating – did not see them beat – saw no stones thrown – it was prisoner that struck him – never said it was any other person – there are informations against witness for a riot, and is now under bail to stand trial at the Sessions.

Mary Heney – Is sister to last witness – went out shortly after her brother – saw the party with drum and fife stop at McManus’s house – her brother and she went down the road – saw her father falling, and shouted her father was killed, as she had seen weapons in the hands of the boys – saw three boys on her father; her brother went to his assistance, and Ingram struck her brother on the head with a bright weapon – her brother then went across the road bleeding, and Ingram struck him with a stone. – Cross-ex. – Does not know how many persons were with her father – saw only the blows on one side – did not see the other party struck – did not hear that those with the drum and fife were to be beat – her father did not strike anyone.

Hugh McManus – The riot happened opposite his door – saw a party arguing on the road – saw them drawing weapons of bayonets – saw Ingram there – some of his own neighbours were there – went to make peace – Ingram attempted to stab witness with a bayonet – a struggle ensued, and he took the bayonet from Ingram – another person made at him, and Ingram attempted to wrest the bayonet from witness, and cut his hand – many were bleeding. – Cross ex. Did not see Robert Heney strike any one – does not know that the parties passing were beat – some of them were bleeding – the drum and fife party run away, as he thinks, for fear of having the worst of it – but he saw none of them beat – saw no weapons with his party.

James Murray, Surgeon – Robert Heney came to his house on the morning of 25th, covered with blood, and said he thought he was killed – examined his head – found the skull completely cut through with some sharp weapon – complained of his side – said he had got a blow from a stone – saw a small contusion on his haunch.

For Defence.

James Ingles – On morning of 25th, left Glenavy with a fifer and drummer, and about seven or eight persons -Wm. Heney came up and give them bad language, but they went on, taking no notice – Heney followed, went on a ditch, and gave a huzza – a few minutes after, near McManus’s house, seven or eight persons came running up as if to break the drum, some of them had their coats off – those with the drum and fife tried to prevent them – old Robert Heney struck Quigley with a stone on the back – this was the first blow struck – Heney’s party then commenced throwing stones, and the others did so also – Heney and Quigley fell too at the ditch and two boys ? Quigley on the head with stones, – does not know young Robert Heney – those who beat Quigley said old Heney was their father – the drummer and fifer had swords – saw no other arms – his party were on their road home – Cross ex. – Saw no arms but the two swords till after the fray was over, when he saw a bayonet with a man named Kerr – did not see Heney wounded – the fight continued about three minutes – Heney’s party had the best of it – the other party run away – did not see Heney’s sons come out of the house.

Alexander Cardle – On the morning of 25th June saw a drum and fife, and about 7 or 8 men, coming long the road, with some women and children – William Morgan and some other men were working in a field – Morgan and they gave a huzza – they then followed the men with the drum and fife – young Heney came out stripped, and in a fighting-like order- his sister was with him, holding him by the arm – saw 7 men running stripped – witness called to some of them to go back to their work – they overtook the drum party – young Heney made a bolt among them as if to catch the drum – old Robert Heney and his party fell on them with stones – saw Arthur Ingram lying gasping on the ground – Heney’s party were the first that struck – saw prisoner then bleeding,, and he and his party run on, and got clear of the other party – prisoner had neither sword or bayonet in his hand – the drum party had the worst of it – ther were only five of that party who engaged Heney’s party – believes young Heney was wounded – does not know who did it.

John Simpson – On morning of 25th June was going to his work – saw prisoner at work that morning – saw the drum and fife and the party going along the road – saw a good many persons follow them – old Robert Heney came up and struck Quigley on the back with a stone, before any offence was given – young Heney was there – drum party got the worst- and had to run away – saw young Heney after he was cut – he said it was Arthur or Alexander Ingram that had done it – did not name the prisoner. – Cross ex. – Fifer and drummer had swords – James Kerr had a bayonet – Thomas Quigley had one – there were no more arms – does not know what tunes they were playing – saw prisoner there – he had no weapon in his hand all that day – might have lost sight of prisoner some part of the time – saw Morgan throw stones at the drum party – saw young Heney and the others run forward to the drum like a pack of hounds and shout to "hell with the drum".

Wm. Stevenson, a boy, gave a similar account of the attack on the drum party by Heney and friends.

W. Bush – Is a yeoman drummer – was going home on 25th June from Glenavy – a party run after him, and shouted to knock them and their drum to hell – a rush was made at them – they came down the hill throwing stones – and ran off to save his drum – had a sword – fifer had one – no other swords were with the party – prisoner had no weapon – saw no bayonets with his party – an attempt was made to break the drum – beat the drum that day – was beating for the Masons the day before – drummers and fifers always wear a sword when they play – the tune was the "Protestant Boys" that they were playing – did not draw his sword.

George McGowan -Was with the party going from Glenavy – saw young Heney struck – knows the person who struck the blow – on his oath it was not prisoner who did so.

Surgeon Murray called to character of prisoner, says, he rather thinks that he is "well-disposed and peaceable".

Rev. Daniel Bell, Curate of Glenavy – Has known prisoner for 10 or 15 years – he is a well conducted, peaceable man, not disposed to riot – is a regular attender at Church.

The Jury then retired, as stated in our last number ; and about eleven o’clock at night his Lordship went into Court, when they were ordered before him. The foreman stated when there was no likelihood of their coming to any agreement on their verdict, and his Lordship then consented to withdraw a juror. The prisoner was afterwards held to bail.

Antrim Assizes – Riot and Assault

The following is an extract from the Northern Whig dated 17th August 1829.

Antrim Assizes. Carrickfergus, Thursday, August 13th
Riot and Assault – party Tunes

Wm. John Ingram, for a riot and assault at Ballymacricket, near Glenavy, on the 25th june last, and with grievously wounding Robert Heney, jun.

Robert Heney – Was at home on 25th June last – heard a drum and fife at the door – went out and saw “a deal of people,” men and women – can’t say how many – were passing by, and seemed as it “haizing through other” – saw his father that morning – heard his sister giving a shout that her father was killed – went down to a ditch – saw his father lying and three persons on the top of him – one person whom he did not know had hold of a bayonet, and his father had the other end of it – went to assist his father – prisoner came across the road, and struck witness on the head with a sword or bayonet, and wounded him severely – prisoner then struck him a second blow on the side with a stone about three pounds weight – did not see prisoner amongst the party before that – witness had nothing in his hand – had been weaving before these people came up. Cross examined – Lives with his father – heard a drum and fife – had been out the day before this (St John’s day) – can’t say but he was in Glenavy that day – saw the drum and fife with the Freemason’s that day – did not know that they had to pass his house next morning – does not know where the party were going to –his father went out to shear the cow’s grass, and not for any thing else – does know William Morgan – he is a neighbour – some more of neighbours were out – one neighbour was there – can’t say how many – could not swear there were not twenty – can’t say that his neighbours gave the drummer and fifer a beating – did not see them beat – saw no stones thrown – is clear it was prisoner that struck him – never said it was any other person that did it – can’t say but he does know John Simpson – never told him that it was Arthur Ingram that struck him – there are informations against witness for a riot, and is now under bail to stand trial at the Sessions – can’t say how many more are to be tried.

Mary Heney – Is sister to last witness – went out shortly after her brother – saw the party with drum and fife stop at mcManus’s house – her brother and she went down the road – saw her father falling, and shouted her father was killed, as she had seen weapons in the hands of the boys – saw three boys on her father – her brother went to his assistance, and Ingram struck her brother on the head with a bright weapon – her brother then went across the road bleeding, and Ingram struck him with a stone. Cross examined – Her father went to shear grass for the cow, and was returning – does not know how many persons were with her father – saw them rioting – went to see what they were doing –did not know her father was among them – she did not throw and stone, nor did her father – saw only the blows on one side – did not see the other party struck – did not hear that those with the drum and fife were to be beat – did not look to see any of that party struck – her father did not strike any one.

Hugh McManus – lives in the parish of Glenavy – saw the riot – it happened opposite to his door; went out; saw a party arguing on the road; saw them drawing weapons or bayonets; saw Wm. John Ingram there; some of his own neighbours were there – went out to make peace – Ingram attempted to stab witness with a bayonet – a struggle ensued, and he took the bayonet from Ingram – another person made at him, and Ingram attempted to wrest the bayonet from witness, and cut his hand; many were bleeding. Cross examined – Was a peace-maker; they were bleeding on both sides; saw no man strike a blow till arms were drawn; saw no stones thrown – the people were arguing when he went out – Robert Henry was in witness’s house – said, here is a party of men, that he did not understand – he told witness not to go out, for he was afraid there would be fighting – did not see Robert Heney strike anyone – does not know that the parties passing were beat – some of them were bleeding – his party had the worst of it – the other party fled – he was never charged with rioting – no warrant was ever against him – no oath against him – he is out on bail – perhaps a warrant was out – the people run away, as he thinks, for fear of having the worst of it – but he saw none of them beat – saw no weapons with his party.

James Murray – is a surgeon, lives in Glenavy – Robert Heney came to his house on the morning of 15th, covered with blood, and said he thought he was killed – was engaged with other patients, and ordered him to be taken to his father’s house – went there shortly after, and examined his head – found the skull completely cut through with some sharp weapon – complained of his side – and he had got a blow from a stone – saw a small contusion on his haunch.

For Defence

James Inglis – Lives near Glenavy – was there on 24th June – and again on morning of 25th, left Glenavy with a fifer and drummer, and about seven or eight persons – were close to them – saw William Heney come up and give them bad language, but they went on, taking no notice – Heney followed, and went on a ditch and gave them huzza – a few minutes after, some persons came up after them – near McManus’s house, seven or eight persons came running up as if to break the drum and fife – some of them had their coats off – those with the drum and fife tried to prevent them; old Robert Heney came up and struck Quigley with a stone on the back – this was the first blow struck – Heney’s party then commenced throwing stones, and the others did so also – Heney and Quigley fell too on the ditch, and some boys hit Quigley on the head with stones – does not know young Robert Heney – those who beat Quigley said old Heney was their father – the drummer and fifer had swords- saw no other arms – his party were on their road home. Cross-examined – Saw no arms but the two till after the fray was over, when he saw one bayonet – did not see Heney wounded – saw no person wounded of his party with a sharp instrument – they were cut with stones – there were seven or eight of his party –there were not twenty that he saw – they had swords on the 24th, and were taking them home – does not think old Heney was much beat –had no weapons himself, and did not interfere – the fight continued about three minutes – Heney’s party had the best of it – the other party ran away – did not see Heney’s sons some out of the house.

Alexander Cardle – Is in the employ of Mr Gore; on the morning of 25th June saw a drum and fife, and about 7 or 8 men coming along the road, with some women and children; saw Wm Morgan come out, and some men were working in a field; Morgan and them gave a huzza; they then followed the men with the drum and fife; young Heney was stripped, and on a fighting like order; his sister was with him, holding him by the arm; saw 7 running stripped; witness called to some of them to go back to their work; they overtook the drum party; young Heney made a bolt among them as if to catch the drum; old Robert Heney and his party all tell on them with stones; saw Arthur Ingram lying gasping on the ground; Heney’s party were the first that struck;prisoner rose up bleeding, and he and his party run on, and got clear of the other party; prisoner had neither sword nor bayonet in his hand; the drum party had the worst of it; there were only five of that party who engaged Heney’s party; saw one sword there; did not see prisoner all the time; believes young Heney was wounded; does not know who did it; young Heney was in the crowd before his father; witness is not a party man, nor a Freemason.

John Simpson – Lives in Glenavy – on morning of 25th June, was going to his work – saw prisoner at work that morning – saw the drum an fife, and the party going along the road – saw persons follow them – there were a great many –the drum party consisted of about 7 or 8 men, and some children – old Robert Heney came up and struck Quigley on the back with a stone, before any offence was given – young Heney was there – Heney’s party consisted of a good many- drum party got the worst – they run away – saw young Heney after he was cut – said it was Arthur or Alexander Ingram that had done it –did not name the prisoner. Cross examined – His work lay about half way between Glenavyand where the fight was – he went past where his work was – did not know that young Heney was stabbed with a bayonet – said he was cut –did not see him struck – he is very far from being killed – fifer and drummer had a sword – James Kerr had a bayonet – Thomas Quigley had one – there were no more arms – does not know what tunes they were playing – the bayonets were in their hands – can’t say if they were concealed in their sleeves – had them in their hands before any riot took place – they had no sticks – young Heney knows all the Ingrams – saw prisoner there – he had no weapon in his hand, or with him at all that day – might have lost sight of the prisoner some part of the time- saw William Morgan throw stones at the drum party – saw young Heney and the other run forward to the drum, and shout, “to hell with the drum.”

Wm Stevenson (a boy) – Was with the drum party on 25th June – there were 7 or 8 men, and some boys – Wm Morgan said they deserved a kick in the a_, them and their drum- a party came down from the direction of the Chapel, and threw stones, and rushed in towards the drum – Pat Kelly, 3 of the Heneys, and others rushed in towards the drum – saw old Heney strike Thomas Quigley with a stone – drum party had said or done nothing before that – prisoner had no weapon. Cross examined – There was some confusion – Robert heney was one of those beating Thomas Quigley – witness was looking on.

William Rush – Is a drummer – was going home on 25th June, from Glenavy – and stopped all night in Glenavy – a party ran after him, and shouted to knock them and their drum to hell – a rush was made at them – they came down the hill throwing stones – saw one stone thrown, and he ran off to save his drum – had a sword –fifer had one – no other swords were with the party- prisoner had no weapon – saw no bayonets with his party – an attempt was made to break the drum – beat the drum that day – was beating for the masons the day before – Ingram had nothing in his hand – drummers and fifers always wear a sword when they play; the tune was “Protestant Boys” that they were playing – did not draw his sword.

George McGowan – Was with the party going from Glenavy – seven or eight persons followed the party – they rushed forward – William Morgan was the first that came – old Heney struck Quigley with a stone – his party had not struck before then – prisoner had no weapon – saw young Heney struck – knows the person who struck the blow – on his oath it was not prisoner who did so – not usual to walk with arms, but they often walk with drums and fifes on the roads – drummer and fifer had their uniform on – is not a Freemason – does not know if prisoner be a Freemason.

Surgeon Murray called to character of prisoner, says, he rather thinks that he is well-disposed and peaceable; never heard anything else.

Reverend Daniel Bell – Is Curate of Glenavy – knows prisoner – has known him ten or fifteen years – he is well-conducted, peaceable man, not disposed to riot – is a regular attender at church.

J. Simpson recalled at the suggestion of the Council for the prosecution, and stated, that he saw two bayonets in the hands of the drum party – they were drawn, but were not using them.

The case here closed, and the Learned Judge addressed the Jury at considerable length. He laid down the law in regard to riot in a very clear and able manner, and recapitulated the evidence, which, he said, was very contradictory; and it was for the Jury to say which of the witnesses were most deserving of credit. The Jury, after consulting for a few minutes in their box, expressed a wish to retire, and they were accordingly conducted to their room, where they remained nearly an hour and a half. The foreman then came out, and stated to his Lordship, that there was not slightest probability of the Jury coming to a decision. His brother Jurors had requested him, however, to notice, that as to the assault there was no difference of opinion – they all agreed to acquit the prisoner of that part of the charge; but as to the riot, they could not agree. His Lordship requested the Jury to withdraw, until he had disposed of the case then before the Court, when he should call them out, and perhaps might be able, by giving a farther explanation, to reconcile their differences. When the trial then proceeding in was finished, his Lordship stated to the Counsel, that he wished to hear their opinion as to a certain point in the case of Ingram. It had been suggested by Counsellor Murray, that the fact of the party going around did of itself constitute a riot; but on referring to the statute, his Lordship was of opinion that a little more was required. There must be evidence to show that they created terror in his Majesty’s liege subjects, or that they assembled with a determination to carry into effect some particular object, and if opposed, to use force and violence in the accomplishment of that object. It would remain therefore, with the Jury to say whether, from evidence, they believed that such was the case. After several of the Counsel had delivered their opinions on this point, his Lordship desired the Jury to be called into Court. They attended; and he explained to them very clearly the law on this point. The Jury again retired; and, after some time, the Foreman again appeared, and stated to his Lordship that they were as far from agreeing as ever. His Lordship, after some farther explanation, said that they must again retire – and he hoped they would be able to agree. He would recommend them, in considering the case , to direct their attention more especially to the evidence of those witnesses that appeared to be the least interested. On witness in particular, a servant of Mr. Gore, had seen the whole affair. He appeared unconnected with either party, and he had sworn that the party with the drum and fife were passing quietly along, and were wantonly assailed and assaulted by the other party.

The Foreman here remarked, that all this had been argued by them very fully; and the observations that his Lordship had been so kind as direct to them had been materially considered, but yet they could not agree. – The Jury remained locked up till eleven o’clock; when there being no hope of agreeing to a verdict, they were dismissed by his Lordship.

Glenavy Affray – Attack on Witness

The following is from the Clonmel Herald dated 19th September 1829.

A correspondent of the Belfast Guardian states as follows: – "Last week, as I passed through the parish of Glenavy, about half a mile from the town, I observed the ruins of a house that appeared to me to have been lately demolished. I was led to inquire into the circumstances, and was informed by a poor-looking woman, who had in her arms an infant child, apparently about nine months old, and who said her name was Peggy McManus – that she was the person who occupied the house, and that a party of Roman Catholics in that neighbourhood had come on the evening if the 9th of August last, armed with spades, shovels, &. &c., dug it down to the foundation, and broke in pieces every little article of furniture she was possessed of. On raising an alarm, she informed me, they dashed stones and other missiles at her and her infant child, one of which struck the child in the forehead, and nearly broke its skull. The poor woman herself was dreadfully blackened in both legs and arms. She was obliged to fly for refuge, lest they would take her life. I saw the child – it had its head tied up, and the little innocent appeared injured. She informed me she was a Roman catholic – that she was noticed to appear at the last Carrickfergus Assizes to prosecute William John Ingram, a Protestant, for the affray which took place at Glenavy on the 24th and 25th of June last, and that it was in consequence of her not appearing and searing what answered their purpose, (what she could not, in justice to herself comply with,) that she received such brutal treatment."

Death Notice – John How

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated 27th April 1830 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

On 27th October, at Mobille, United States, of fever, in the 25th year of his age, John, eldest son of John How, Glenavy.

Death Notice – Jacob Lyons

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated 30th November 1830 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Death: On the 11th inst at his house, near Glenavy, Mr Jacob Lyons, aged 67 years of an apoplexy.

Missing — Alexander Ross

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 17th December 1830 and is used with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

On Monday the 6th instant, a deaf and dumb man, named Alexander Ross, left his brother’s house in Ballinderry, and went to Crumlin market. About 10 o’clock at night he was conveyed out of Crumlin by one of the inhabitants, of whom he had been asking lodging; but since that time he has not been heard of. As the mill-dam of Mr. Howe of Glenavy was on his way home, it was supposed he might have fallen in. The dam was accordingly searched, and Mr. Howe, with a laudable regard for the feelings of the parties, though at considerable inconvenience to himself, allowed the water to be drawn off, but no trace of the unfortunate man could be discovered. When he left home his dress consisted of a blue coat, striped waistcoat, corduroy small clothes, shoes, black stockings, all nearly new, and a half-worn castor hat.

Protestant Meeting

The following is an extract from the Manchester Courier dated Saturday 21st January 1832.

Public meetings of Protestants.

Despite the frowns and discreditable tactics of government, Protestant meetings are taking place all over Ireland. At Newtownards, on Saturday week, where more than 5000 respectable Protestants of all ranks attended; at Glenavy, on the same day; and at Magherafelt, on Thursday se’nnight, at which the long old tired, and fearless champion of Protestantism, the Rev. J. Graham, presided. Spirited and constitutional resolutions and addresses were agreed to at each, in conformity with those of the conservative meeting here – Dublin Warder.

Mrs Tom Boyle

The following is an extract from the Examiner dated 29th April 1832

On Monday evening in the poor-house of this town, Ann Boyle; she was, by her own account, 110½ years of age – by her son’s calculation, 108 years. Since her admission into the poor-house, about two years ago, she had a new tooth, which, however, was not perfectly formed, having no enamel, and which she shed about ten months after. Until within three months of her death, she could see even to thread her needle. Her son, now an inmate of the poor house, is nearly 70 years of age. The deceased was from the neighbourhood of Glenavy, and was married to Tom Boyle, a small farmer there. She was the mother of five sons and a daughter. Most of her sons went into the army. After the death of her husband; about twenty five years ago, she removed to Belfast and lived by the sale of pork-steaks, and other meat of that kind, and was always a remarkably active woman, until about four years ago, when she had a sudden paralytic stroke, which deprived her of the use of her limbs. She was a short, thick-set woman- her chief beverage was tea, which she took at least twice a day – and never tasted spirituous liquors. Since she went into the poor-house, she was contented with the common fare of the house; and, though she went on crutches, scarcely ever missed a Sunday in going to the Catholic chapel. Her son seem to have been a strong man, but though only seventy, is obliged to use crutches – Northern Whig.

Burned to Death — Margaret Morrison

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 11th March 1834 and is used with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Dreadful Accident – In Glenavy, on the 26th ult. A fine little girl of six years old, named Margaret Morrison being left in the house by her grandmother, the little girl bolted the door, and was employed in making a feast, when her clothes caught fire, and, thinking to extinguish the flame only made it worse, by rolling herself in some loose straw which lay in a corner of the house; the straw ignited immediately, and in that situation she remained, till a neighbour, perceiving the smoke bursting from the house, forced open the door, when she was found involved in flame, and burnt in such a shocking manner, that she expired in four hours after.

Corn Mill Millwright Wanted

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 7th November 1837 and is used with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Wanted Immediately

A Millwright, capable of erecting the machinery of a Corn Mill. – Security will be required for the performance in a given time. – Apply to Thomas F. How.
Glenavy, November 1st, 1837.

Accident on Horse

The following is an extract from the Belfast News Letter dated 28th February 1858 and appears with permission of the Belfast News Letter.

Accident – An accident that might have terminated more severely occurred to Mr. Harris, the excise officer for Glenavy district. Returning home from his duties on horseback past Kilcorig Bridge, where there is a deep and dangerous precipice, his horse took fright, and made a sudden bolt that precipitated them both down the steep. Happily, Mr. Harris (who is much liked in his district) escaped with only a broken leg, from the results of which his numerous friends will be glad to hear he is now speedily recovering.

Thomas R Stannus, Esq – Glenavy Rejoices

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 31st December 1869 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Rejoicings in Glenavy in honour of Thos. R. Stannus, Esq.

On Thursday evening last, Glenavy was the scene of considerable rejoicing, in honour of Thos. R. Stannus, Esq., who has just returned from his wedding tour. Early in the evening large bonfires were lighted on all the hills round the town, and they were observed many miles distant. At seven o’clock, a most brilliant display of fireworks took place, under the direction of Messrs. John and James Lorimer, which gave general satisfaction. A very large number of the respectable residents of the neighbourhood and their friends from a considerable distance thronged the town, and enjoyed themselves till a pretty late hour. At eight o’clock, between thirty and forty of the farmers of the town and neighbourhood sat down to an excellent supper in the granary of Mr. John Lorimer, of Glenavy, among whom were the following:- Arthur Mussen, Esq. M.D.; Messrs John Oakman, John Lorimer, Francis Barrons, James Ballance, Wm. Kearns, Joseph Fitzgerald, George Ferris, Arthur Armstrong, Samuel Ballance, Shaw Armstrong, James Allen, William Fitzgerald, John Johnston, James Armstrong, John Bullick, Langford Geddis, John Mairs, Wm. John Ingram, Walter Waugh, Edward Johnston, Benjamin Oakman, McKinstry McNeice, Wm. John Higginson, James Lorimer, Wm. Mountgarrett. After the cloth was removed, on the motion of Mr. John Lorimer, the chair was taken by Arthur Mussen, Esq, M.D. The following toasts were given and responded to: "The Queen," "The Prince of Wales and the rest of the Royal family." "The Lord Lieutenant, and prosperity of Ireland." "Thomas R. Stannus, Esq.," the toast of the evening responded to by Mr. Joseph Fitzgerald; "Dean Stannus," responded to by Mr. Samuel Ballance; "Walter Stannus Esq.," responded to by Mr. Wm. Fitzgerald; "The Tenant-farmers of Glenavy," responded to by Mr John Bullick; "The Ladies," responded to by Mr. Walter Waugh. After spending a most agreeable evening, the parties separated, giving three hearty cheers for the newly-married couple.

Everything connected with the bonfires and fireworks passed off in the most satisfactory manner, not a single incident having occurred to mar the harmony of the evening’s proceedings.

The following is an extract from the Lisburn Standard dated 10th July 1886

South Antrim Elections

Return of Mr William Grey Ellison Macartney … in a 6th paper he was nominated by Arthur H. Pakenham, J.P., Langford Lodge, seconded by James Lorimer, Glenavy. Assenters: Philip Corkin, Crumlin; W J McCluney, Crosshill; John H McCance, Cherryvalley; John Bullick, Ballydonaghy; John Clarke, Killead Rectory; John Henderson, Dundrod; Thomas Johnstone, Tullynewbane & Samuel Cromey, Glenavy.

Swine Fever

The following extract is from The Lisburn Herald, May 7th, 1898.

Lisburn Board of Guardians – Swine Fever

A communication was read from the Veterinary Department officially intimating that swine fever existed on the premises of Mr. Samuel McClurg, Glenavy.

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Standard – Saturday, June 27th 1890

The sale of Lady Wallace’s Estate – Good News.

In our issue of May 3rd we published a circular, signed by Mr. Fred L/ Capron, J.P. intimating to the tenants of Lady Wallace in the town lands of Largymore, Lisnatrunk, Tullynacross, Taghnabrick, Ballyskeagh, Ballymullen, and Ballantine (in the Counties of Down), and in the town lands of Lambeg and Daringly (in the County of Antrim), that her Ladyship would be willing to sell them their holdings at twenty years purchase upon their present rental; but it was added that, "considering the position of the farms, she would not give back a year’s rent, as upon the more distant portions of the estate." The Lisburn Standard of June 13 contained the following advertisement:-

"A great number of the tenant-farmers in the Townlands of Knockmore, Ballymacoss, Clogher, and Magheralave cannot accept Lady Wallace’s offer to purchase their holdings unless they get an abatement of a year’s rent, same as given on other portions of the estate, as most of them could not pay up arrears."

We learn that some days since a memorial was forwarded to Lady Wallace, through Mr. Capron, J.P., asking her to allow the tenants to purchase their holdings on the same terms as tenant-farmers in Ballinderry, Glenavy, and other parishes are paying – twenty years’ purchase, with one year’s rent forgiven; and we understand a number of the memorialises have received an intimation that her Ladyship has graciously acceded to the request. We take it, therefore, that the tenants over the whole estate are thus, by Lady Wallace’s generosity, placed, so far as the terms of purchase are concerned, on a perfect state of equality, and we congratulate all interested on the fact.

Vaccination Act Defaulters

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Standard – Saturday, July 19th 1890

Lisburn Board of Guardians
Vaccination

The Assistant Clerk read a letter from the Local Government Board, inquiring if the defaulters under the Vaccination Act in the union had yet complied with the law, and added that the returns from the medical officers had been received. It appeared from these that the defaulters in the several dispensary districts were as follows:- Anahilt,0; Ballylesson, 4 (one of these was named as a defaulter in last quarterly return); Dunmurry, 13 (4 of these were returned in the previous list); Glenavy, 2; Hillsborough, 16; Knocknadona, 9 (7 of these were named as defaulters in previous report); Saintfield, 1; Lisburn, 85 (45 of these were mentioned as defaulters in former return).

Mr. Gray moved that all who were named as defaulters in the last quarterly report, except those who had the reasonable excuse of their children’s illness to assign, should be prosecuted.

Death of Queen Victoria

The following articles appeared on the death of Queen Victoria, marking the end of the Victorian era:

The Lisburn Standard – Saturday 26th January 1901
DEATH OF THE QUEEN
A Nation in Mourning

The sad news o the death of our beloved and revered Queen was received in Glenavy with the deepest sorrow and regret. The Bell of the Church is tolled daily, flags are at half-mast high, and the local shops are partially shuttered as manifestations of respect for her Majesty..

The Lisburn Standard – Saturday 9th February 1901
GLENAVY

A solemn memorial service was held in this church on the 2nd inst., at 2.30. The service consisted of the office for burial of the dead, with the required alterations, and with the addition of the special prayers appointed to be used in all the English churches on the occasion. The special hymns chosen were – "For all Thy Saints who from their labours rest", "O King of Mercy, from Thy Throne on High", "Peace, Perfect Peace". At the close of the service the Nunc Dimittis was sung, the congregation kneeling, after which the organist played the Dead march in Saul. The officiating clergy were the Rev. J. Boyle-Glover, M.A., vicar, and Rev. T.L. Sloane, B.A. (curate assistant).

Breach of Promise of Marriage

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Herald, September 30th 1905

Law Reports
Dublin Wednesday.
Glenavy Breach of Promise.

Before Mr Justice Ross.

This is an action instituted by the plaintiff against the defendant for damages for breach of promise of marriage. Both the plaintiff and the defendant reside near Glenavy, in the County of Antrim, and an application was now made to have this case remitted to the County Court Judge for the County of Antrim.

Mr W.M. Whitaker, B.L. (instructed by Mr. Samuel McConnell, solicitor, Lisburn and Belfast) applied, on behalf of the defendant, that the action be remitted, as defendant had a good defence, and the plaintiff had really no visible means if a verdict should be had for him.

Mr. M.G. Ellison, B.L. (instructed by Mr E Wilson, of Lisburn), appeared for the plaintiff, and consented to the remittal order being made.

His Lordship remitted the action accordingly.

Regal Visit

Extract from The Lisburn Herald, Saturday, November 24th 1906

The Viceroy and Vicerene in Lisburn
Countess of Aberdeen’s Ancestors

It only became publicly known on Thursday forenoon from their Excellencies the Lord Lieutenant and the Countess of Aberdeen had notified their intention o motoring over to Lisburn from Antrim with the object of inspecting the memorial to General Sir John Nicholson in the Cathedral, and to visit the residence where the Dowager Lady Tweedmouth, Sir James Weir Hogg, General Nicholson, and other members of Lady Aberdeen’s family lived in former years…

At Glenavy

In passing through Glenavy, the Vice regal party were greatly pleased with the reception given them by the children of the Glenavy School. His Excellency stopped his car, and, asking for the head master, expressed his pleasure at the warmth of the children’s greeting, presented Mr. Camp to her Excellency the Countess, and requested that his visit might be marked by the children receiving a half-holiday – a wish that brought forth another expression of enthusiasm. As their Excellencies drove away they were followed by the hearty cheers of the children.

Mr Craig Wins South Antrim Election

The following is an extract from the Belfast Newsletter dated 31 01 1910 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Glenavy

The news of the result of the South Antrim election was awaited in Glenavy with intense anxiety, and when, shortly before twelve o’clock, the numbers were announced by telegraph nothing could have exceeded the enthusiastic outburst of rejoicing at the overwhelming majority of the Unionist candidate. The local bands were requisitioned, and kept the village in a state of animation for two or three hours. On the approach of nightfall the village was packed by the arrival of friends and sympathisers from the neighbourhood. At seven o’clock a splendid display of fireworks was given from the Protestant Hall, and two bonfires – one at each end of the village -added to the effect. Dr. Mussen addressed a few words to the crowd, saying that as on the previous day they had driven the last nail in the coffin of Russellism, they would take the liberty of giving it a decent lively funeral. They might rest assured that the majority obtained by Mr. Craig in South Antrim would be sufficient guarantee that there would be no glorious resurrection for some time to come. He pointed out the fact that Antrim, from Whitehead to Fairhead, was now solid for the Union. This, together with the recent display of Ulster Unionism at the polls, made a state of affairs which would have to be reckoned with in any attempt to interfere with the integrity of the empire. Cheers were given for Mr. Craig, after which the crowd dispersed.

Death Notice – George A Waring, M.D.

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 24th February 1910 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

Death

Waring – February 19 at Glenavy, George A. Waring, M.D., son of the late Lucas Waring, solicitor, Lisburn. Funeral strictly private. No flowers.

William Geddis’ buttermilk

The following is an extract from the Lisburn Herald dated 09 April 1910.

In Belfast Summons Court, on Monday, William J Geddis, Glenavy was mulcated in 20s and costs for selling buttermilk which contained 53 parts of added water. Inspector Reynolds tool a sample of milk in the market.

Temperance Work in Glenavy

The following extract is from the Lisburn Standard dated Saturday November 19 1910.

Temperance work in Glenavy

The opening meeting for the session of the parochial total abstinence society was held in the schoolroom, Glenavy, on the evening of the 14th inst., the vicar (Rev. J. Boyle-Glover) presiding. The meeting having been opened with hymn and prayer, the chairman gave a short address, exhorting the members to be zealous and earnest workers in the cause and to seek to gain fresh adherents. The following programme was much enjoyed:- Opening chorus by children’s choir, pianoforte solo, Miss McMahon; song, Mr. W.L. Briggs; recitation, Miss Ruth Sherlock; song, Miss B. Beattie; song Rev Dr. Walker; song Miss Farr; recitation, Miss M Branagh. A hymn having been sung, the address, an exceedingly practical and most interesting one, was given by the Rev Dr Walker, who spoke of the increasing interest in temperance reform displayed at the present time in so many directions. At the request of the chairman, the speaker dealt also with the origin, work and progress of the "Protestant Total Abstinence Union" and at the close of the evening it was decided to transform the present local society into a branch of the "Catch my Pal Union." The pledge of the union was given by the speaker to a large number who came forward. The following elections in connection with the new branch took place:- President Mr John Laird, J.P.; vice-president Rev J Boyle-Glover, M.A.; honorary secretary and treasurer, Miss Wolfenden. The election of the committee was postponed until the next night of the meeting. The interesting proceedings closed with the blessing ad singing of the National Anthem.

Hibernians Visit Glenavy

The Lisburn Herald, Saturday, August 31st, 1912 reports the following incident in Glenavy.

A Lively Sunday in Glenavy
Rumoured Visit of Hibernians
Protestants Muster to Defend Village against Sabbath Desecration.
Exciting Scenes

For several weeks past the inhabitants of Glenavy have suffered from much annoyance and provocation from Nationalist excursionists, who while passing through the village, conducted themselves in such a reprehensible manner, utterly regardless of the sanctity of the Sabbath Day, as to rightly excite the indignation of the loyal and peace-loving populace of that district. Not only did the visitors, during church hours, sing Fenian songs, but taunted and used the most provocative language towards individuals whom they passed on the road. Similar, if not worse behaviour, had recently been experienced in Crumlin. The climax was reached when a rumour was circulated early last week that the Hibernians were going to hold a demonstration on Sunday in the vicinity of Glenavy, through which they would march in procession with bands and flags. This was too much for the Protestant boys, who quickly made up their minds that under no circumstances would they permit a visitation of the kind, and from some source, unauthorised, we were assured, by the Orange Society or Unionist Club, instructions were given for the publication of a small poster, which read as follows:

"Protestants of Glenavy and Crumlin districts, assemble in your thousands at Glenavy on Sunday, August 25th, at nine o’clock a.m. to protest against the invasion of the village and district by Hibernians from Belfast or elsewhere on that date, and to protest against their Sabbath desecration. God save the King!"

Parcels of the posters were forwarded to the outlying districts, but, through the intervention of Dr. Mussen, J.P., the respected District Master of the Orangemen, the exhibition of the bills was promptly countermanded. It was only at the last moment that the Doctor became aware of the existence of the bill, and, realising the gravity of what might follow, he caused messengers to be sent to stop the posting, and recall all available bills. To a great extent his efforts succeeded, but in some places we observed copies posted high up on the trees. The Doctor’s anxiety did not end here, for at much personal inconvenience he used his powerful influence to the utmost to prevent a counter demonstration. However, the "Boys" had their back up, and no amount of persuasion could turn them aside from what they believed was their bounden duty to stand firm and resist the invaders, whose insults they were not going to tolerate any longer. They had no desire to quarrel with their Roman Catholic fellow-residents, with whom they had been living peaceably: but they opposed in the strongest manner the desecration of the Sabbath. They freely admitted that they did not mind the holding of sports or demonstrations on week days, but they certainly would not allow them to take place there on Sundays.

It subsequently transpired that it was a party of gaels, and not the Hibernians, who were coming to a feis, or sports meeting at Feumore, which is situate about 4 miles from Glenavy, and not far from the shore of Lough Neagh. However, the determined attitude adopted by the people of Glenavy made it patent to the authorities that the situation was very serious. Representations to this effect were accordingly made by the police to those responsible for the arrangements in connection with the demonstration at Feumore, and at the request and on the advice of the constabulary it was decided early on Sunday morning that the Belfast contingent, travelling by the 9.5 a.m. train from the Great Northern Railway terminus, should alight at Ballinderry, and proceed thence to Feumore, which is almost equi-distant from either station, there to join the other contingents. At the same time the members of the Neill O’Neill Pipers’ Band at Cockhill, whose intention it was to await the arrival of the Belfastmen at Glenavy station at 9.18 a.m., were acquainted by the police of the altered arrangements, but, evidently mistrusting their informants, they decided to adhere to their original intention, and march to Glenavy Station, on the outskirts of the village. On the arrival of the train at Ballinderry at 9.11 a.m. the Belfast Pipers’ Band detrained, and accompanied by several men of the Royal Irish Constabulary, they formed up and marched off quietly. At Glenavy, however, at least two hundred Protestant men and youths, ignorant of the changed plans, had assembled at the approach to the station to watch the arrival of the train, and to await developments. When the Cockhill contingent came in sight there was considerable hooting and some shouting, and when the train steamed in the Cockhill men marched up to the other corner of the approach to the station. The police had to exercise considerable tact to ensure that order was kept. As soon as the Neill O’Neill Band and their followers numbering some fifty in all, perceived that they had made a fruitless journey they turned about and marched down the road on the way to Feumore to the accompaniment of a chorus of hooting from the crowd which had assembled. Had it not been for the presence of Dr. Mussen, who stepped between the two parties, and the cordon of police, under District – Inspector Heatley of Antrim and Sergeant Barrett, the opposition to the presence of the demonstrators might have taken a more serious form. However, the Protestant crowd made no attempt to harass the Cockhill party, but simply saw to it that they made no effort to enter the village. On the departure of the band the defenders proceeded in an orderly and becoming manner to the Belfast road, a little beyond and to the right of the parish church, where they halted to await the approach of brake-loads of Hibernians who were expected to come in that way from the city. Fortunately the visitors did not put in an appearance, for their reception would have been of the warmest character, and the small force of police at the command of the District-Inspector could not have averted the collision. There were no incidents worthy of recording. From eleven o’clock until the afternoon in fact the place was so calm and peaceful that the reporters adjourned to the church and attended Divine service, the preacher on the occasion being the Rev. Mr. Clarendon, curate, who preached a sermon particularly appropriate to the times.

As the day advanced the crowd, which had stubbornly remained on the watch, was largely augmented, amongst the new arrivals being many cyclista from the outlying hamlets. The police having circulated that the Belfast Gaels were most likely to entrain at Ballinderry on the return journey, the crowd became more scattered in the early part of the afternoon, though never out of touch with the main body, who could not be induced to move from the village. They were leaving nothing to chance, and were not disposed to place any reliance on rumours. We made a journey to Ballinderry during the day, and had as opportunity of noting the remarkable system of cyclist patrols, with evidently, pickets stationed at every road leading towards the Lough. The plans were so perfect that the "invaders" could not have crossed the border line unobserved. The whole country was watched, and all strangers were closely scruntized. Even the Belfast reporters, notwithstanding that they were in good company, were at times eyed with suspicion. Especially was this case at Ballinderry, when they made their first appearance there. They were promptly challenged, and with equal promptness responded, the result being satisfactory to both sides. Towards evening the crowds concentrated in the vicinity of both Glenavy and Ballinderry stations to await the coming of the Gaels. The return train to Belfast was timed to leave Glenavy at 7.50 p.m. and Ballinderry seven minutes later. At six o’clock in consequence of a message received from Ballinderry, the police were strengthened at Glenavy, and District-Inspector Heatley, who all day had discharged his duty with great discretion and ability, proceeded hurriedly to Ringsend, where he met the Belfast pipers’ Band attended by a crowd some 250 strong. Mr Heatley warned them of the danger they would incur if they approached Glenavy in such a manner, and strongly advised the followers to return to their homes, he undertaking that if they did so he would see the Belfast party safely into the train. Luckily his advice was accepted. The contingent from Belfast was then escorted by the police towards the station. The crowd, which had assembled in the main road at the steep approach to the station, greeted them with booing as they turned the corner and came in sight, and as they reached the station stones were thrown. The party sprinted over the last hundred yards or so to the accompaniment of a shower of stones, and as they dashed into the waiting room where the other passengers were assembled, the police turned, and leaping over a fence, ran down the embankment to the main road again, where by dint of pushing and persuasion they managed to get the crowd up the road towards the village. They were greatly assisted by Dr. Mussen, who again did all he could to quell the excited crowd. There yet remained about ten minutes before the train was timed to depart, and during this period , with the gathering gloom, members of the crowd made many attempts to clamber over the station fences and gain the platform. The attitude of the crowd became so menacing that, on the advice of Mr. Sherlow, the intelligent stationmaster, the passengers vacated the waiting room in favour of a smaller room, in which they extinguished the lamps. Here they spent a few anxious minutes while the police, whose numbers were extraordinarily small, were busily engaged keeping the station approaches clear. At length the train arrived, and the passengers dashed across the platform into the nearest compartments. Two of the pipers were struck with stones – one on the chin and another on the side and arm. It was with a sigh of relief that the police and the passengers saw the train move out of the station.

Meanwhile at Ballinderry, an equally determined crowd had gathered, and had occupied the roads from Feumore, but no one was molested. The arrival from Feumore of four members of the Royal Irish Constabulary was greeted with party cries, with booing, and with shouts of "Where are the pipers?" When the train arrived from Glenavy stones were thrown, and six panes of glass were smashed, and one of the missiles striking a passenger on the knee. At the first sign of stone throwing the constabulary advised the passengers to stand, with the result that no one was injured either by falling glass or by stones, and on the train proceeding on its journey matters assumed a normal aspect.

A humorous incident occurred at Glenavy in the morning. A few of the villagers were watching the departure of the Belfast contingent, and noting that they were few in number, speculated as to how the remainder of the anticipated crowd would perform the journey. One of the men noted that at the rear of the train a red flag was flying, denoting that a special train was following. The crowd awaited the arrival of the special, and as it approached one of their number exclaimed, "They are bringing the Hibernians in closed vans!" But the train did not draw up – it was composed of horse boxes, and was proceeding to Antrim to collect horses in connection with the Dublin Show.

The Lisburn Herald, on 7th September, 1912 reported the following:

Sunday Excursions at Glenavy.
Local Orangemen’s protest.

The members of L.O.L. No. 227 Glenavy at their monthly meeting held in the Protestant Hall on the evening of the 31st ult., passed the following resolution:

"That we desire the most emphatic manner to enter our solemn protest against the unseemly and irrelevant manner in which the Lord’s day has been for some time past desecrated by the conduct of gangs of outsiders, who, under the guise of excursionists behave in the most disorderly manner, towards the loyal Protestant inhabitants. We resent this behaviour more especially as the village is well known for the spread of goodwill and friendly toleration which pervades the different sections of the community. We would deplore anything that would tend to disturb this friendly feeling and as we believe such reprehensible conduct would do so, we call on the authorities to suppress these invasions otherwise we believe they may lead to breaches of the peace, probably violence."

Signed by Dr. Mussen.

The Lisburn Herald makes the following observations:

Under the caption "Skirmish between Hibernians and Ulstermen," the "London Daily Chronicle" (Radical) has an amusing paragraph, referring to a Gaelic festival at "Glenary" (meaning Glenavy), "County Down." It tells its readers that the Hibernians were to hold a "Gaelic" meeting, and goes on to say that at Ballinderry shots were "fired in the air and several persons received injuries!" Just imagine that. We must have missed the aerial fusilade, but then we never thought of looking for the merry Hibernians in aeroplanes. Any Gaels we saw were on "Shank’s Mare," and right well did they gallop. We were not aware that Glenavy had crossed the Lagan into the County Down. After all, we don’t expect accuracy in the English Radical Press regarding Irish happenings.

The following extract is from The Irish News and Belfast Morning News dated Monday 26th August 1912. This extract is reproduced by kind permission of The Irish News. This paper gives a slightly different account of the day’s events.

Wild Sunday Scenes.
Attack upon Excursionists at Glenavy
Station Besieged
Unionist Mob Assails Non-Political Travellers.
Revolver Shots
Passengers’ Experience Returning from Aeridheacht.
(from our Reporter)

The spirit generated by recent Unionist oratory is finding expression in more ways than one in rural Ulster. Its latest phase developed yesterday in an attack made upon a body of excursionists engaged on an outing neither political nor religious in character – an aeridheacht and sports held at Feymore, Co. Antrim, on the shores of Lough Neagh and within view of Ram’s island. Everything possible was done in advance to organise local feeling in the district against what was wilfully misconstrued into a "Hibernian Invasion," although it was perfectly clear and obvious that the function, which was promoted locally, was not identified with any religious or political body or organisation, and neither in its character nor in any detail of the arrangements gave the slightest excuse for feeling, not to say the violence and turmoil actually evoked on this occasion. The nominal excuse manufactured in advance to be argued on behalf of the mob is a misdirected zeal against what they are supposed to consider "desecration of the Sabbath". It is thus left open to inference that the population of the district consider the attacking of visitors and the creation of riot, a better way of spending the Sunday than participating in a peaceful and pleasant Irish gathering such as held on the Lough shore yesterday afternoon.

A Preliminary Poster

The fact of such a function taking place on a Sunday was quickly seized upon by the extremist Orange and Unionist section; and, under the old pretence of religious qualms of conscience, they made their hostile intentions known in the earlier part of last week by the following "proclamation," which appeared on posters throughout the neighbourhood:

"Protestants of Glenavy and Crumlin districts! Assemble in your thousands at Glenavy on Sunday, 25th August, at 9 o’clock a.m., to protest against the invasion of the village and district by Hibernians from Belfast or elsewhere on that date and to protest against the desecration. God save the King!"

Yesterday the police force in Glenavy and Ballinderry was strengthened by bodies of constabulary from Lurgan, Toomebridge, and other outlying districts, and prior to the arrival of the Belfast train the unusually pastoral environment of both villages was quite transformed in appearance by the number of police on duty. The place looked as it preparing for fierce encounters between opposing parties.

Avoiding Trouble

Acting on the advice of the police, the Pipers’ Band from Belfast and other visitors to the aeridheacht from the city did not proceed to Glenavy, but broke the journey at Ballinderry. On arrival, the platform was practically deserted except for a few loungers. The threats of what would happen on their return journey from Feymore were, however, already being whispered abroad, and these threats afterwards proved no idle words. The counter move of the band to avoid coming in contact with a mob at Glenavy proved successful, but it rather incensed the rowdies, who were assembled in hundreds at the last mentioned station. However, they were not left altogether without what they would probably term “fun”.

The local pipers’ band were also unaware of their Belfast visitors’ sudden intention to get out at Ballinderry, and, as had been previously arranged, they marched from their rooms to Glenavy Railway station with the object of accompanying the Belfast contingent to the field. As the time approached for the arrival of the train the waiting crowd had assumed considerable proportions, and a cordon of police, under the charge of District-Inspector Heatley, was drawn across the road, dividing the station from the mob.

Glenavy Scenes

The whistle of the train was the signal for a rush towards the railway premises. This was quickly checked by the police, who drove the yelling crowd back about two hundred yards from the station. When it became known that the Belfast contingent had avoided the rowdies by curtailing their rail journey, the mob became unmanageable. They made every effort to get at the local band, which had meanwhile started to march towards the field. The scene at this period was wild, stones and other missiles being thrown at the heads of the unfortunate musicians who retreated under cover of the police. Dr. Mussen, J.P., coroner for the district, in the face of some danger from the missiles, used his efforts to check the disorder, but without much avail, until at last the band got clear on the way to the field.

The mob then attempted to march towards the catholic Church, but were stopped by the police, who forced them back.

Mob’s Movements

They then came along the Belfast Road using vile and violent language, and calling upon all whom they met to declare their religion. A rumour was current amongst them that several contingents en route for the aeridheacht would travel by brakes in Glenavy, and it was under this impression that the crowd occupied the road. During the day the mob, flanked by cyclist "scouts," patrolled the district in the hope of meeting any belated travellers by road from Belfast suspected of being bound for Feymore.

In The Evening
Excursionists Attacked at Glenavy and Ballinderry.

In the evening – after the aeridheacht and sports, which were of a most successful and enjoyable nature – things began to look serious again, both in Glenavy and Ballinderry, when crowds assembled around the railway station. Taking it for granted that the Belfast contingent would walk back to Ballinderry, a crowd of several hundreds waited expectantly for them, relieving the "vigil" by using blasphemous language regarding the Pope and Catholics in general. But they were again outwitted, as the band decided to return to Glenavy. After leaving the field the crowd accompanying the two pipers’ bands grew to considerable proportions. They were met by District-Inspector Heatley, who advised the local men to return home, and not give any excuse for a riot. This advice was immediately acted upon, and the Belfast contingent continued their journey.

The arrival of the little band at 8.20 p.m. at glenavy was the signal for an outburst of yelling by a crowd of several hundreds stationed at a cross-roads near the railway station.

Revolver Shots.

Stones, Bricks, and all kinds of missiles were flung at the oncoming band; while revolver shots could be hear repeatedly. The scene became very wild, and, amidst the excitement, the district-inspector rushed forward and shouted "Run for it boys." The little band did run, under a fusillade of stones.

Railway Station Siege.

The station premises were at last reached by the Belfast people, but not before several had received nasty wounds. Amongst those injured are James Taylor and James Clements, who received cuts to the head and body. Refuge was taken in the waiting- rooms, but the mob outside made several attempts to get in through the windows. The lights in the rooms were extinguished, but the police by this time had, by a flank movement, cut off the main body of hooligans from the premises and chased them up the road. This state of siege was, however, maintained until the arrival of the train.

Immediately the train left the platform, showers of missiles crashed against the carriages, and the passengers – amongst whom were a number of women and children – were forced to shelter from the risk of stones or broken glass. Revolver shots were also to be heard, adding to the confusion and terror of the ladies and young people huddled in some of the carriages.

An Adventurous Journey.

A renewal of the attack occurred when the train reached Ballinderry, As the train steamed into this station the passengers were forced to find safe, if sometimes undignified position, sheltered from the flying missiles which came from one side. The roughs here appeared to be ensconced behind every hedge and railing, for stones and bricks came in volleys against the carriages, smashing the glass of the windows. The whistle of the guard was a welcome sound, and at last the train steamed out of "firing distance."

Considerable excitement was evident amongst waiting passengers at stations between Ballinderry and Belfast on witnessing the condition of the carriage. On arrival in Belfast a large crowd had gathered in Great Victoria Street. Up to the present no arrests were reported in connection with the affair either in Glenavy or Ballinderry.

A report of the Aeridheacht and sports appears in our sporting page.

Gaels at Feumore
Enjoyable programme of Sports and Irish Music and Dancing

An enjoyable aeridheacht mor was held yesterday at Feumore, Co. Antrim, when a splendid Gaelic programme of sports and amusements was submitted. The weather, though threatening in the morning, turned out beautifully fine when the proceedings commenced. There was a large attendance from the various districts, and the field presented a very animated appearance, with the coloured costumes of the pipers and the holiday dresses of the ladies. No better spot could have been selected for such a meeting than the broad field which overlooks Lough Neagh and the picturesque island below. A procession, headed by the Belfast Pipers, marched to the field, when the proceedings were opened by Mr. F.J. Bigger, M.R.I.A., who, in an eloquent speech, referred to the necessity of teaching Irish in the schools and also of having a thorough knowledge of the history of the country inculcated into the minds of the young. An excellent sports programme was gone through, the following being the events and winners:-

100 yards open handicap – J. O’Hara,1, P.Lavery, 2. Wm. Lavery, 3.
Long Jump – J. O’Hara 1., J. Hannon, 2., Wm. Lavery, 3.
One mile open handicap – J. Hannon,1, J. Brannon, 2. J. Barnes, 3.
Putting 16lb shot – J. Magee, 1. J. Filbin, 2. W.H. Hickland, 3.

At the conclusion of the sports an enjoyable programme of dancing and singing was submitted, after which the prizes were presented by Father McBride.

The following is an account as appeared in The Lisburn Standard, Saturday, August 31st 1912.

Party Feeling At Glenavy
Protestants Resent Sunday Desecration
Will Stand it no Longer.

The village of Glenavy and the surrounding district was the scene on Sunday of a remarkable state of affairs, which was the outcome of a rumoured invasion of the place by a band of the Ancient Order of Hibernians, whose intention it was said was to hold a demonstration and a sports meeting.

Naturally the prospect of such a gathering on the Sabbath was the source of much indignation among the loyal inhabitants, and seeing that on a number of occasions recently Nationalists had driven through the village during church hours singing and shouting Fenian songs, the inhabitants made up their mind to put a stop to this Sabbath desecration, in their district at any rate.

Accordingly on Sunday morning a number of Protestants assembled at Glenavy Railway Station shortly after nine o’clock to await the arrival of the train from Belfast. Meanwhile the authorities were alive to the possibility of unpleasantness, and, getting into communication with the intending visitors – Gaelic Leaguers and not Hibernians as was at first thought – prevailed upon them to agree to detrain at Ballinderry station and walk to Feumore – the distance being much the same as from Glenavy. The party which was a small one included a number of pipers in Gaelic costume, was accompanied by a few policemen, and met with no interference at Ballinderry, the station and its approaches being deserted.

When a few minutes later, the train stopped at Glenavy it seemed at first as if similar conditions were to be in evidence there. Only a few people got out of the train, and passed down the avenue leading to the main road, which is thirty five feet below the railway level and out of view of the station. At the gate leading from the station there was gathered a crowd of Gaels with pipers waiting for their friends, while facing them, and separated only by a few yards was an assemblage of about 200 of the villagers. In the space between, District Inspector Heatley, Antrim, had a cordon of his men drawn across the road, while Dr. Mussen and he did the utmost in a tactful and friendly way to prevent anything in the nature of disturbance. On being informed that their friends were already on the way to Feumore, the Gaels, who represented the Cockhill fraternity marched speedily away in the direction of Ballymacricket Chapel, to attend the eleven o’clock mass prior to engaging in their sports. The village party returned to the village.

On the return journey the Gaels reached Glenavy station at 7.30 and there was some stone throwing, and the arrival of the train came as a welcome relief. At Ballinderry a large crowd congregated near the station in anticipation of the return of the Gaels. Some shots were fired in the air, and as the train came in there was loud groaning when the uniformed Leaguers were seen in one of the carriages. As the train moved out, the stones were thrown through one or two of the windows, but happily no person sustained any serious injury.

Local Protestants complain of singing and brawling parties of Hibernians and Gaelic Leagurers from Belfast principally, who drive through the village on Sundays and make the air bedious with their curses and party cries.

They say they have stood enough of this vulgarity and will stand it no longer.

Arthur Camp

The following extract is from The Lisburn Standard dated 7th September 1917.

Welsh Appointment for Glenavy Resident.

The post of engineer for the County of Radnor, Central Wales, with oversight of the Government machinery therein and headquarters at the Automobile Palace, Llandrindod Wells, has been offered to and accepted by Mr. Arthur G. Camp Avey Lodge, Glenavy.
The appointment, which carried a remuneration of £300 per annum, with official car and expenses, is a striking tribute to the versatility of the gentleman concerned, whose many activities in the educational, musical, and church life of his district, will be greatly missed.

His record as a student, and teacher testifies to his attainments in the world of education, having many honours, medals, and prizes to his credit, won both in Dublin and London.

His colleagues of the teaching profession recognised his abilities by placing him in the chair of the Lisburn Association and sending him to represent them at the county meetings, as well as the annual teachers’ congress for the past two years. It was while performing the latter duty in 1916 that he distinguished himself in the cause of mercy by doing plucky ambulance work in Dublin during the memorable events of Easter week.

In the musical world he has also established an unique reputation as organist, composer and bandmaster; while up to the outbreak of war he was for many years one of the few Irish representatives on the council of the Tonic Sol-fa College, London. He was presented last year by one of his brass bands with a beautiful gold watch as a token of esteem.

Now to a fresh field of activity comes this important call necessarily testifying to already won distinction in the world of mechanics, and Mr. Camp retires with honours from a profession of which he was an ornament, and which, we feel sure, regrets the loss of so talented a member.

A Day on the River

The following extract from a newspaper (source presently unknown) forms part of a scrapbook belonging to the Downer family.

It has been dated June 1919.

Angling
A Day on the Glenavy River

This short note of a day at Glenavy is, I see dated June 3rd, 1889 – just thirty years ago. What a lot of water has flowed under the bridge since then! It is with feelings of mingled delight and sadness I look back over these thirty years to that bright morning of early summer, for I was only twenty then. The old-time eagerness to catch trout has not, however departed, but some of the energy, alas, is gone. This on reading over the notes in my diary of this date I am inclined to marvel at the remarkable energy I must have displayed – both as regards the early start, the long bicycle ride, and the walking, climbing, and scrambling I must have gone through on that warm June day. Since then I have frequently fished at Glenavy, and with varying success. I am not certain, however, as to the present condition of this river, but I hope to revisit it one of these days and find out, and I doubt not that – even if the fish are fewer or smaller – the stream will lull me with its magic charm as of yore, and revive many old memories. I was in the habit of writing up, while still fresh in my recollection, notes of the small events which filled up my fishing outings, and I find the following record of this particular expedition :- Wakened by alarm clock at 3.30a.m. A grey morning, and a recent shower has left the garden paths wet and shining. A light breeze is stirring the leaves. Dressing hurriedly, I make myself a hasty breakfast, and am off on my bicycle – rod and landing net strapped along the frame, and basket on my back – on the stroke of 4.30. All well until the far side of Lisburn is reached, when I have to shelter for over twenty minutes from a heavy shower. Roads very wet for next two miles. Arrive Glenavy at 6.30. River appears just right, neither too high nor too low – seemingly clearing after a slight spate. Leave bike at station, and walk down the road to the doctor’s gate and cross the little field to the river. Trout rising in the pool at the bend, and so, putting my rod together, I creep over to within casting distance and put my flies just above the rising fish. A rise but short. The next attempt is more successful, and a nice half pounder is safely landed. This has disturbed the pool, but in the shallower water just below there is a determined rise, and another trout of rather over a quarter-pound is basketed. Fishing all the likely spots, I wander about half a mile downwards, and then, as the sport seems to be slackening I decide to try the upper reaches of the river above the village. My little downward stroll has, however, resulted in seven trout. As it is now 8 o’clock, I stop to have a second breakfast at Mrs. Armstrong’s inn, and at 9.30 I take the road, though before doing so secure two trout from Larmour’s mill-dam, one of them scaling just three-quarters of a pound.

The walk up the road on such a lovely morning is a pleasant one, and arriving at the point on the river where the water enters the mill-race. I start operations once more, with this result that thirteen sporting fish are added to the bag. It is 1 o’clock when I reach the bridge, where I take a rest and have lunch, being entertained meanwhile by a young farmer with stories of giant trout which he and other have captured with “the worm” when the river was in flood. Above the bridge there is a series of small, rather deep pools, difficult to put a fly over owing to the long grass and weeds – to say nothing of the bushes – surrounding them. However, by crouching down and using a short line I account for nine more trout before reaching the road near Stoneyford. It is now 5 o’clock, so, as I think I might have another try at Larmour’s dam before leaving for home. I take to the road and wander slowly towards Glenavy, conversing at intervals with cottagers and pedestrians. On reaching the dam I find the wind has completely died away, leaving a mirror-like surface reflecting the old mill. However, there is a trout rising in a patch of foam just below the neck of the race, close to the hedge, and so, putting my small flies just above rising fish, a splashing rise, and the heaviest capture of the day is hooked and landed. He proves to be just thirteen ounces.

This ends my day’s fishing, and my rod is taken down, and the fish – thirty in all – carefully packed in the basket, and I quite ready for the excellent meal of ham and eggs, home-baked bread, and tea provided by my good friend Mrs. Armstrong. It is nearly 10 o’clock when I reach home, tired, but well satisfied with my day at Glenavy. I find it noted that the flies used on this occasion were hare’s ear and yellow, "Wickham’s Fancy," olive quill, and a small red hackle – the two first-named proving the most successful. There is a charm about fishing a small stream like the Glenavy water that is often not to be found on a larger river. Many anglers prefer fishing lakes or reservoirs, and these certainly have attractions – the chance of larger fish – a less strenuous day, perhaps. Still, there is a feeling of complete rural delight in a long spring or summer day spent among the sweet-scented hedgerows, and along the flowing banks of a gentle little stream like the Glenavy. Such a day is one of the really good things given to man – or, anyhow, given to a fisherman.

Old Izaak.

Poem by Max H. Smith

The following is an extract from the Lisburn Standard dated 12th January 1929. This is a poem by Max. H. Smith, Glenavy.

Retrospect – Prospect.

Time is passing! And just now we stand
Downeast, yet hoping, on that borderland
Where the old year vanishes in the gloom,
And New year comes to take its room.
Downeast, because of troubles we have seen,
Where cheery comfort might have been;
Of sad upheavals in our social life,
Of great unrest, and of direct strife.
Downcast, because of duties unfulfilled
By those in power, who should our Empire build,
And not uproot its well considered ways,
Which hitherto have won such world-wide praise.
And yet hoping still that, ere it be too late,
Wiser heads may guide the Ship of State;
May renovate a Constitution, broken down,
Restore content to country and to town.
Revive the commerce of our Motherland
And find employment for such willing hand;
Then Socialistic efforts will be made in vain,
And Empire’s citizens will reap the gain.
Come then, New Year, with all your joyous chimes,
For heaven yet will grant us happier times.

Change of Polling Place

The following extract is from The Lisburn Herald dated Saturday March 30th 1929.

Representation of the People’s Acts
County of Antrim.

The Antrim County Council hereby give notice
that they have applied to the Ministry of Home Affairs (N.I.)
for their confirmation to a scheme adopted by the Council at a Special Meeting held on 25th March, 1929, providing for the rearrangement of certain polling places throughout the county….

Polling district affected: Glenavy

Alterations: Polling place to be in the townland of Ballymacricket instead of the town land of Glenavy.

Mr Hugh Minford, MP

The following is from The Lisburn Herald, Saturday June 15th 1929.

Crumlin welcomes Mr H Minford

Mr Hugh Minford MP addressed large and enthusiastic meetings at Crumlin and Glenavy on Friday evening 7th inst. Mr Minford who was met on the outskirts of Crumlin by a large crowd was taken from his car and carried shoulder high to the platform which had been erected on the street.

He was welcomed by Colonel Pakenham who said he was quite sure the electors of Antrim Division had made a wise choice. Mr Minford was in every way worthy to represent that important division, and wuld be felt sure, give entire satisfaction to the electors.

Mr Minford who was loudly cheered, returned thanks to the electors of Crumlin and district for the confidence they had reposed in him, and for the assurance which they gave through him to Lord Craigavon of their steadfastness and loyalty to the Government. The presence of bands and drums enlivened the proceedings, and hearty cheers were given for the member as he left for Glenavy.

Protestant Orphan Society

The following extract is from The Lisburn Herald Saturday July 6th 1929.

At the quarterly meeting of the General Committee of the Protestant Orphan Society on Thursday, 2 applicants were admitted to the benefits of the Society from Christ Church, Lisburn; 6 from Glenavy; and 2 from Moira.

Crumlin Petty Sessions

The following is an extract from the Lisburn Standard dated Friday 4th April 1930.

Crumlin Petty Sessions.
Similar Charge.

A similar charge was brought against James Armstrong, Glenavy, who wrote to say that he found it impossible to attend the court. The case was adjourned for a month.

A woman whose name was given as Mrs. Farr said she employed defendant, to drive her car on January 2,15 and 16, paying him on each occasion.

Constable Malone said he saw the car standing in Glenavy village.

Glenavy Child drowned – a terrible tragedy

I had heard a story from several of the older residents in the village who made reference to a child who was drowned many years ago.

The incident had a profound effect on one lady. She told me, that as a schoolchild, aged about seven, she could remember the father and mother of the child standing at the door of their home, which was one of the houses beside the Blacksmith’s shop (Alex Ferguson). The lady asked the school-children if they would like to go into the house and see the little girl. The lady recalls going in and seeing the wee girl in a white coffin. "She was dressed in a lovely little white dress. She was like a wee doll."

Another lady told me that there were two stone steps down to the mill race in this area. She had been warned as a child not to go near this if they were going down to a nearby well for a drink of water. The water in the well was described to me as "clear, cold and lovely". There was a rail across it, the children put their hands in to refresh themselves.

After some searching I found the story in the local papers.

The following is an extract from the Northern Whig and Belfast Post dated Wednesday, June 29th 1932.

Glenavy Child Drowned.
Found in Mill Race near Parents’ Home.

Within two hours of being reported missing from her home yesterday a little girl only eighteen months old, Julia Coakley, of Glenavy, was found drowned in the Ulster Flock Company’ millrace, which runs within ten yards of the home of her parents.
The child had apparently been playing near the stream, and was missed about three o’clock. Her parents at first thought she had been taken for a walk by some children who had just returned home from school, but they soon became anxious, and a search was started.

Two hours later she was found by the local blacksmith, Alexander Ferguson, and a county roadman, R. Wilson, in the race about fifty yards from her parents’ home. It is believed that the little girl fell in opposite the home and floated down the race.

Dr. West was summoned, and, with the assistance of W. Armstrong, a signalman at Glenavy Station, artificial respiration was tried, but the efforts were unsuccessful.

An inquest will be held today at 3 o’clock in Glenavy by Dr. Reid.

The following is an extract from the Lisburn Standard – 1st July 1932.

Glenavy Child Drowned.

A two year old child, named Julia Coakley, was accidentally drowned in a millrace, at Glenavy. The child was missed about three o’clock, but it was thought she was with other children. A search revealed that she had fallen into the millrace, and the body was later recovered by Mr. A. Ferguson and Mr. R. Wilson. Dr. West was called, but could only pronounce life extinct.

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Herald dated 2nd July, 1932.

Child Drowned at Glenavy.

On Tuesday last, after being missed from home about two hours, a little girl, eighteen months old, named Julia Coakley, was found drowned in the Ulster Flock’s Company’s mill race, which runs within ten yards of the home of her parents.

The child had apparently been playing near the stream, and was missed about three o’clock. Her parents at first thought she had been taken for a walk by some children who had just returned home from school, but they soon became anxious, and a search was started. Two hours later she was found by the local blacksmith Alexander Ferguson, and a county roadman R. Wilson, in the race about fifty yards from her parent’s home. It is believed that the little girl fell in opposite the home and floated down the race.

Dr. West was summoned, and, with the assistance of W.Armstrong, a signalman at Glenavy Station, artificial respiration was tried, but the efforts were unsuccessful.

Electricity for Lisburn Fringe

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Herald dated 26th November 1932.

Lisburn Rural Council.
Electric lighting

The Lisburn Electric Supply COmpany Ltd., wrote that they were applying for a Fringe Order to supply electric light on the north west and west side of Lisburn, and inquiring if the COuncil had any objection to the erection of poles and the necessary excavations.

On the motion of Mr. Ballance, seconded by Mr. Benson, the required permission was given. Mr. Ballance remarked that they wanted electric light at Glenavy.

James Crawford’s Unfit Pig

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Standard dated Friday 23rd December 1932.

Glenavy man’s pig.

A prosecution was brought in Belfast Summons Court on Monday against James Crawford, Glenavy, for having had in his possession a pig unfit for human food.

Mr. James Craig for the Corporation and Mr. John Beggs for the defendant.

Evidence was given by Mr. McLean, City Veterinarian, who stated that the carcase, when he viewed it, was a febrile (feverish) condition.

This defendant stated he did not know this particular animal was in a febrile condition. It was killed along with six others, and was the last to be cleaned. This, he believed, accounted for a little reddishness. The other six pigs were sold in Antrim. The carcase brought to Belfast was too light to go to Antrim.

Mr. J. McWhirter, with whom sat Mr. Robert Scott, asked if Mr. Craig pressed for a heavy penalty.

Mr. Craig said these cases were hard to detect.

Mr. Beggs said that was the first time defendant had appeared before the Court.

A fine of £5 with costs was imposed.

Jubilee Day

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Herald dated Saturday May 18th 1935

Jubilee Day at Glenavy

Some little time prior to Jubilee Day a representative committee was formed under the auspices of Glenavy Loyalist Association to work up the various districts connected with the village. Mr. Hames Walker was appointed hon. Secretary of this Jubilee committee. Messrs J Lyle and A. Peel being president and vice-president respectively.

The people of the district entered into the spirit of the occasion quite joyously and enthusiastically. Sub-committees were formed to work up a programme of sports, etc., a good part of which was devoted to the entertainment of the school children in and around the neighbourhood for whom tea was provided, and 400 souvenir mugs presented. The village was profusely and tastefully decorated for the occasion by a special committee set apart for the purpose, and to whom much credit is due.

The day’s proceedings began with a united service in the parish church at 1 p.m., after which the children were marshalled, and marched to an adjoining field headed by Glenavy Flute Band. On reaching the sports field, kindly lent by Mr. Jas. Ross, the orders of the day were announced by Mr. J. Lyle, president , after which Mr. Walker read his Majesty’s gracious reply to a telegram of congratulation sent to him by the committee. After singing the National Anthem the sports’ programme was taken up, and vigorously engaged in. Special features of the afternoon were a juvenile fancy dress parade, adult fancy dress parade, and decorated cycle parade. The prizes for those events were distributed by Miss Sefton, Glendona, and the judging was in the capable hands of Rev. R.A. Mollan, M.A., Rev. J.A.Walton, M.A., Mrs Mollan and Mrs Walton.

A most harmonious and happy day was brought to a close by a gigantic bonfire lighted at 10.30pm by Mr J. Ross on Bonfire Hill, Glenavy. About £35 was spent on entertainment and decorations, and a small balance is being sent to Lisburn and Antrim District Hospitals.

Coronation Celebrations – 1937

Glenavy Coronation Celebrations 12th May 1937.

Glenavy Coronation Celebrations 12th May 1937. Commencing with a service in the Parish Church at 1.30pm.

The Coronation Celebrations in Glenavy - Sports Programme  12th May 1937

The Coronation Celebrations in Glenavy – Sports Programme 12th May 1937

The Coronation Celebrations in Glenavy - Sports Programme  12th May 1937

The Coronation Celebrations in Glenavy – Sports Programme 12th May 1937

In Memoriam – Walter Paterson

The following extract is from the Belfast Newsletter dated 13th July 1944 and appears with permission of the Belfast Newsletter.

In Memoriam

Paterson (Fifth Anniversary) – Treasured memories of our darling baby Walter. Will always be remembered by his loving Mummy, Daddy and Grandparents – Glenavy and Belfast.

Cadet Force Exercise

The following extract is from the Lisburn Herald dated 12th June 1948.

Arm cadet force. Exercise at Glenavy.

Almost 100 members of "A" and "B" Companies, 1st (Belfast) Cadet Battalion, The Royal Ulster Rifles, and "C" (Lisburn and Glenavy) Company, 2nd (County Antrim) Cadet Battalion, The Royal Ulster Rifles, took part in a well-planned exercise over undulating country at Glenavy last Saturday.

Showery weather did not upset the enthusiasm of the boys, who crept past barriers, climbed wire fences, and patrolled lanes and paths for over two hours.

Operation Sackville, as the exercise was called, provided experience in map reading, camouflage, signalling, and field craft.

The exercise produced useful instruction in attack and defence, and officers expressed themselves as well satisfied with the conduct of the companies.

Directing the staff were :- Lieut.-Col. W.A. Shooter, C.O. 2nd (Cadet) Batt.; Major F R A Hynds, M.C., Acting C.O., 1st (Cadet) Batt; and Major S. Collier, O.C. "A" Company, 1st (Cadet) Batt.

The chief umpire was Major R. Lyttle, M.C., second in command 2nd (Cadet) Batt.

Visit by Duchess of Gloucester

The following is an extract from The Lisburn Standard 8th October, 1954

Duchess of Gloucester will be seen in Lisburn next week.

The three days visit by the Duchess of Gloucester to Northern Ireland from Monday next, 11th October, to Wednesday, will enable people in Lisburn and district to see Her Royal highness on several occasions.

On Monday, following her arrival at Aldergrove by air at noon, the Duchess will drive to Government House via Crumlin, Glenavy and Lisburn at about 12.40 pm. At 2.40pm the Duchess will drive to Belfast via Lisburn, and after a series of engagements will leave Belfast at 5.20am for Hillsborough via Ballyaughlis, Hillhall and Lisburn. The following day the Duchess will leave Government House at 10.40am and drive to Ballykinlar (route not specified) returning to Hillsborough at 6.15 pm.

On Wednesday the Duchess will leave Government House at 10.25am for Aldergrove and will depart for England by air at noon. There will be presentations and inspections beforehand these ending with farewells by the Prime Minister (Lord Brookeborough), Lady Brookeborough and others.

Bomb Attack on St Clare’s Hall

The following is an extract from The Ulster Star dated 11th January 1974 and appears with permission of The Ulster Star.

No community can feel secure

The South Antrim Association of the S.D.L.P. has condemned the New Year’s Eve bomb attack on St. Clare’s Hall, Glenavy.

In a statement they say that during the last twelve months the people of Glenavy area have been subjected to a number of terrorist outrages. These have included attacks on licensed premises as a direct result of which many were injured and homes damaged. And it adds, "The most recent attack took place on New Year’s Eve when a 50 to 100 pound bomb was exploded at the side of St. Clare’s Hall during a parish social."

No Warning.

The explosion followed a similar pattern to all the others in that no warning of any kind was given. It was providential on this occasion that there was no loss of life. It is becoming evident that the men of violence are directing their efforts against easy targets. In the months to come no community, however peaceful, can have reason to feel secure."

Phone Kiosk

The following is an extract from The Ulster Star dated 27th September 1974 and appears with permission of The Ulster Star.

Phone Kiosk

The erection of a telephone kiosk at Johnston Park, Glenavy has been recommended by the Lisburn Borough Council.

Battle for a Footbridge

The following is an extract from The Ulster Star dated 17th January 1975 and appears with permission of The Ulster Star.

Glenavy residents vote for an underpass.

Proposals for the provision of an underpass or an overhead bridge at the Glenavy bypass were discussed at a meeting on Monday night under the auspices of the Glenavy Ratepayers’ Association. The meeting was attended by representatives of the Department of the Environment Roads Service, the R.U.C. traffic branch, Mr. Ian Watts, District Development Officer, Dr. Derrick Crothers, Mr. Vincent McCloskey and Mr. Peter McLaughlan, Assemblymen and Councillor Patrick Ritchie and Councillor John Maze, members of Lisburn Borough Council.

Query.

It was reported that a query which had been sent to the tenants of houses on one side of the bypass indicated that 96 per cent favoured an underpass, three per cent an overhead bridge and one per cent "nothing at all."

The meeting discussed the advantages and disadvantages and cost of an underpass and overhead bridge and the majority of those present favoured an overhead bridge.

Photograph

A photograph of an overhead bridge was circulated at the meeting along with other documents.

There was a discussion on what steps could be taken to have road signs, etc., erected.

It was decided that people living in the 50 houses should again be contacted for their views on an overhead bridge.

The following is an extract from The Ulster Star dated 7th March 1975 and appears with permission of The Ulster Star.

Glenavy Residents carry on 4 year fight for a subway.

Plans for a footbridge over the main airport road at Glenavy have been given a cool reception by residents there.

And Assemblyman Peter McLachlan who led the fight for a subway instead, is disappointed.

He says "I am pleased some decision has been reached after all this time but I regret the residents didn’t win the day."

Even Minister John Concannon’s assurance that the £35,000 footbridge will be provided "as soon as possible" has done nothing to curb the residents anger.

Determined.

After a four year fight Mr. David Price, secretary of the Glenavy Tenants’ Association is as determined as ever to continue his battle. He declares : "We met with Ministry officials and we might as well have stayed at home. Mr. Concannon didn’t waste any time. He told us we would get a footbridge but as far as we are concerned that is woefully inadequate. A footbridge isn’t good enough for the number of old people we have around here."

Ludicrous.

"The whole thing is ludicrous. On frosty mornings we will be supplied with two buckets of sand, one a each side. Whether they start construction work or not we will be contacting Mr. Rees to have the whole matter re-examined."

So the Glenavy battle looks as if it will go on for some time yet.

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